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Vol. 91, nos. 1-11 



September 8, 2005 - 
November 17, 2005 



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Will the ""Eyrie'' reach new heights? 



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One copy free 








CALL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 



Volume 91 Issue 1 



September 8, 2005 



NflltomI Briefi 

Oilfor-food Ccwmpt 

UNITED NATIONS-A 
U.N.-appointed panel 
investigating corruption in 
prewar Iraq's oilforfood 
program delivered a 
scathing rebuke of 
Secretary General Kofi 
Annan's management of 
the largest UN, humani- 
tarian aid operation and 
concluded that Kojo 
Annan took advantage of 
his father's position to 
profit from the system. 

Student Files Lawsuit 
GARDEN GROVE, Calif 
- A 17-yearold lesbian 
high school student alleges 
in a lawsuit filed 
Wednesday that she was 
unfairly disciplined by 
school officials for hugging 
and kissing her girlfriend 
on campus, 

The lawsuit in U.S. 
District Court also alleges 
that a school principal 
revealed senior Charlene 
Nguon's sexual orientation 
to her parents, suspended 
her while allowing similar 
behavior by heterosexual 
couples and forced her to 
transfer to another school. 

"It was horrible. I was 
discriminated against by 
the administrators," said 
Nguon. 

U.S. Troops Free 
American, Iraqi HostAffSS 

BAGHDAD, Iraq U.S. 
forces freed American con" 
tractor Roy Hallums in an 
early morning raid on a 
farmhouse south of here 
Wednesday, more than 10 
months after he was 
abducted from a Baghdad 
office. 

A U.S. military spokesman 
said soldiers raided xhe 
house hours afttr they 
learned of Hallums' where- 
abouts from an Iraqi 
detainee. An unidentified 
Iraqi citizen was freed, 
and another detained. 

Student Pleads ^Not 
Guilty' in Terror Case 

SANTAANA, Calif. - One 
of four men accused of 
plotting attacks on U.S. 
military facilities and 
southern California syna- 
gogues pleaded not guilty 
Tuesday to federal terror- 
ism charges. 

U.S. prosecutors say Santa 
Monica College student 
Hammad Riaz Samana, 
21, was working with a 
prison-founded sect of rad- 
wal Muslims on the bomb- 
ing plan. 

Calif. Gay Marriage Bill 
SACRAMENTO, Calif.- 
The California Assembly 
voted Tuesday to allow gay 
and lesbian couples to 
marry, making the state's 
legislature the first in the 
nation to deliberately 
approve same -sex mar- 
riages and handing a polit- 
ical hoc potato to an 
already beleaguered 

Republican Gov. Arnold 
Schwarzenegger. 

- complied from 

the Los Angeles 

Thn^ - V\te8hin|ffon 

P(»t News Service 

iiMlex 

Opinion 3 

Call on You 3 

Features 4 

Entertainment 6 

Classifieds 7 



President to announce plan today 



Grunenwald discusses 
budget cuts 

Paul Anderson 
Circulation Manager 

s_pmanderson@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 7-Across 
campus, the effects of the 
$2.6 million dollar budget 
cut passed down last semes- 
ter are being felt, and many 
are wondering what this 
means for the rest of the 
2005/2006 academic year 
and beyond. 

Already the campus has 
felt the two-percent tuition 
increase, and many depart- 
ments have lost some part- 
time and temporary faculty. 
Many are feeling the cuts in 
their specific departments. 

"The budget cuts were 
spread broadly," President 
Joseph Grunenwald said 
Sept. 6. "A number of fac- 
tors caused the need for 
cuts, including low appro- 
priation and tuition increas- 
es along with a decline in 
enrollment. With the credit 
requirement now at 120, 
students are graduating 
faster. Instead of going nine 
semesters, students are 
done after eight. With jun- 
iors and seniors graduating 
faster over the past three 
years, the numbers in the 
upper division have 
decreased. The number of 
freshmen and transfer stu- 
dents has been roughly the 



same over the years, but the 
upper divisions are lower. 
This brings enrollment 
down by five or six percent." 
"A larger percentage of 
students have been getting 
degrees than in previous 
years," William Bailey, dean 
of enrollment management, 
confirmed. 

"The next cut will be 
somewhat smaller than last 
year," Grunenwald said 
when asked about a possi- 
ble future cut. "We still 
don't have all the cuts cov- 
ered. There has been 20 
years of consistent cutting 
[in relation] to state appro- 
priations and budget. 
However, no deficit rolled 
over from the past [academ- 
ic] year." 

Grunenwald also doesn't 
believe that any friction has 
occurred between the 
administration and the fac- 
ulty over the budget cuts. 

He said, "No, the faculty 
and the administration 
have worked together well 
and will continue to do so. 
While these are difficult 
times, it has been the spirit 
of cooperation that has seen 
us through." 

Clarion's APSCUF repre- 
sentative. Dr. Colleen 
McAleer, who had a meeting 
with Grunenwald over the 
summer concerning the 
budget, said, "I think every- 
body at every level is con- 
cer;igd ^\\^^ |he ..bjidg^t 
cuts.i"' 



When asked how aware he 
believes the student popula- 
tion is about the budget sit- 
uation, Grunenwald said, 
"There are plenty of com- 
munication challenges in 
getting information to stu- 
dents. All students know 
some things that they've 
picked up from various 
sources, but it can be hard 
[to translate] statistics into 
something understandable. 
Budget cuts don't occur in 
terms of trade-offs. A large 
pool of money is distributed 
across a variety of pro- 
grams. Money comes from 
various places and sources 
and are earmarked for very 
specific things, like build- 
ings. This year, there will be 
a new e-mail publication 
called 'Presidential News 
and Views' that will come 
out at the first of every 
month. This will allow for 
greater communication to 
students and faculty." 

"We're making the best 
choices we can," he said. 

"Last year, we were 
authorized to search for fif- 
teen new permanent faculty 
members and hired them to 
start this semester. We have 
and will continue to have 
the courses needed for stu- 
dents to move up and grad- 
uate. Students may not get 
the electives they want or at 
the time of day they want, 
but the cuts won't hold 
them back." 

"Ihis university is solid at 



its core," Grunenwald said 
"and this means faculty. 
Those people know how to 
work hard. Students need 
to realize that our faculty, 
who could go someplace else 
in a heartbeat with their 
qualifications. ..stay here. 
This makes me feel better 
when things look dark." 

He said, "On Thursday 
night, we'll be announcing a 
Comprehensive Strategic 
Plan process. This planning 
involves an evaluation of 
our current program' while 
looking at what is needed in 
the next five years. For 
example, in today's mar- 
kets, what science and 
social science programs are 
needed? Is it possible to, 
from the day a student 
enters campus as a fresh- 
man, get a masters degree 
in five years? Is there a 
place for us in Homeland 
Security?" 

When asked if the CSP 
involved modifying current 
courses and majors, 
Grunenwald said, "This is 
mainly to see what new pro- 
grams we are able to create. 
This is more of a strategic 
plan than a tactical plan. 
Working with courses is tac- 
tical. Dealing with the 
majors is strategic. We're 
looking at majors that may 
have outlived their useful- 
ness. We need to move the 
money where it is needed to 
meet future markets." 

SeePf«£SID£fVr,|N02. 



Hurricane 
Katrina 
cleanup slow 

Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post 
News Service 

The Army Corps of 
Engineers increased the 
rate that flood waters in 
New Orleans are being 
pumped out, but the agency 
is still taking a slow 
approach out of concern 
that hidden damage could 
cause new breaches in 
storm walls and levees. 

The tremendous power of 
Hurricane Katrina, which 
tore hundreds of feet of 
steel-reinforced storm walls 
in three drainage canals, 
has left engineers worried 
that other sections of the 
complex flood-control sys- 
tem are weakened and 
could fail without warning, 




The Washington Post/Michael Robinson-Chavez 

In Katrlna's Wake - A rescue boat floats down Canal Street, one of the city's 
main arteries, In search of stranded residents in New Orleans. 



officials said. 

"The last thing we want is 
another flood wall to go 
down," said George 
Stringham, a spokesman 
for the Army Corps. "We are 
not 100 percent certain of 
their strength. We are going 
to move carefully to see how 
much pressure they can 
handle." 



As the water levels drop 
on the city side of the storm 
walls, they will be subjected 
to millions of tons of pres- 
sure from the higher waters 
of Lake Pontchartrain. 
Engineers are worried that 
the storm may have under- 
mined the wall foundations, 
which are hidden from view 
by the flood in many sec- 



tors. 

The agency began pump- 
ing operations late Monday, 
operating a single tempo- 
rary pump at about 100 
cubic feet per second, a 
"drop in the bucket" in 
terms of the volume needed 
to reclaim flooded sections 
of the city, said Army Corps 
spokesman John Hall. 



Sigma Pi loses recognition after liquor violations 

I Both Clarion University recognition and national fraternity's Grand Council charter revoked 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Sept. 7 - The 
Theta Alpha chapter of 
Sigma Pi lost its University 
recognition and had their 
charter revoked following a 
late night raid of the chap- 
ter house by authorities in 
March. 

On the evening of March 
31 / April 1, Pennsylvania 
State Police and the Bureau 
of Liquor Control 

Enforcement raided the 
Sigma Pi chapter house, 
located on 84 Fraternity 
Drive, in Clarion Township. 
This resulted in over 80 
underage drinking cita- 
tions. 

In addition, two fraternity 
members and the chapter 
itself were charged with the 
sale of alcoholic beverages 



without a license. 

As a result of these events, 
Sigma Pi lost its University 
recognition on April 29, 
after a University Board 
hearing. However, the chap- 
ter chose to appeal the con- 
duct board's decision. 

University President 
Joseph Grunenwald asked 
Harry Tripp, vice president 
for student and university 
affairs, to review the chap- 
ter's appeal. After review, 
however, Tripp found no 
new arguments from those 
heard by the Conduct Board 
that would justify overturn- 
ing on the board's decision. 
Shortly after these occur- 
rences, Sigma Pi's Grand 
Council revoked the chap- 
ter's charter. 

Assistant Director of 
Campus Life Shawn Hoke, 
said, "As part of the 



Conduct Boards" original 
decision, the chapter's 
University recognition was 
originally revoked until 
such time as all current 
members either graduated, 
transferred or withdrew 
from the university. 

However, as a result of 
their appeal, Vice President 
Tripp reduced the length of 
time for the loss of recogni- 
tion to a period of one year, 
provided that none of the 
current members are 
allowed to be part of a new 
group. 

The reduction in the peri- 
od of time recognition was 
lost due in large part to the 
commitment shown by the 
chapter's alumni and 
International Headquarters 
to maintaining a chapter at 
Clarion University. 

Clarion University's chap- 



ter of Sigma Pi included 20 
members during the spring 
2005 semester. 

Sigma Pi was formed at 
Clarion 10 years ago in 
1995. However, the chapter 
received its International 
Fraternity Charter on 
March 15, 1997. Sigma Pi 
was originated on January 
26, 1897. 

Hoke said, "During the 
course of the spring 2005 
semester, the Office of 
Campus Life was 

approached by two different 
groups of students who 
expressed interest in start- 
ing new fraternities. One of 
the groups has fallen off the 
radar and one is currently 
working with a national 
fraternity headquarters in 
the hopes of beginning the 
colonization process early 
this semester." 



Legislators 

look at 

academic 

freedom of 

speech 

John Santa 
News Editor 

sjmsanta@clarlon.eclu 

CLARION, Sept. 7 - A com- 
mittee has been formed in 
the Pennsylvania State 
Legislature that is poised 
for an internal look at the 
ability of the State System 
of Higher Education's pro- 
fessors to allow free speech 
in the classrooms of all of 
Pennsylvania's state uni- 
versities. 

The committee, dubbed 
the Academic Freedom com- 
mittee, is headed by State 
Representative Gibson 
Armstrong, (R., Lancaster 
County) and was formed as 
House Resolution 177 
(HR177) on July 5. 

According to HR177, the 
resolution establishes "a 
select committee to examine 
the academic atmosphere 
and the degree to which fac- 
ulty have the opportunity to 
instruct and students have 
the opportunity to learn in 
an environment conducive 
to the pursuit of knowledge 
and truth at state related 
and state owned colleges 
and universities and com- 
munity colleges in the 
Commonwealth." 

Rep. Armstrong noticed 
the immediacy for an inves- 
tigation into the subject of 
freedom of speech at state 
universities after he was 
approached by a member of 
his constituency. According 
to Armstrong, the con- 
stituent's grade was signifi- 
cantly lowered because her 
political views, shared in a 
paper that she wrote, were 
different than that of her 
professor's. 

"What it boils down to as 
a teacher or a professor," 
said Armstrong, "is that 
your job is to teach your stu- 
dents not what to think but 
how to think. The profes- 
sors I respected the most 
were the ones I didn't 
understand the ideology of." 

"There were Democratic 
co-sponsors on this resolu- 
tion," said Armstrong, "and 
now that the resolution has 
passed it is not going to be a 
partisan event." 

To ensure a bipartisan 
investigation, Armstrong 
enlisted the assistance of 
the Foundation for 
Individual Rights in Higher 
Education (FIRE), which is 
based in Philadelphia. 

"They will be my right - 
hand man or organizat'on 
in developing the course 
these hearings will take," 
said Armstrong, 

According to FIRE's web- 
site www,thefire.org, "the 
mission of FIRE is to defend 
and sustain individual 
rights at America's increas- 
ingly repressive and parti- 
san colleges and universi- 
ties. These rights include 
freedom of speech, legal 
equality, due process, reli- 
gious liberty and sanctity of 
coiiscience; the essential 
qualities of individual liber- 
ty and dignity. FIRE's core 
mission is to protect the 
unprotected and to educate 
the public and communities 

Sm free speech, pag9 2. 



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Pafle2 



TOR CLARION CikLL 



September 8. 2005 






Tarpley new student trustee 



Jeffry Richards 
Staff writer 

sJprlchardsOclarion.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 6 ■ When 
the students of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania 
need a voice, Ronald 
Tarpley is now that voice. 

Ronald Tarpley, senior, 
was elected the student 
trustee to the Clarion 
University Board of 
Trustees earlier this sum- 
mer, a replacement for the 
2005 graduate, Chad 
Horner. Appointed by 
Governor Ed Rendell, 
Tarpley gladly accepts the 
position and hopes to serve 
the university well. 

Tarpley is a communica- 
tion major, also looking to 
receive a minor in political 
science. Tarpley attended 
the Pittsburgh High School 
for the Creative and 
Performing Arts where his 
concentration was photog- 
raphy. Now Tarpley is an 
active student at Clarion 
University, and is involved 
in various organizations 
thoughout including, the 
Black Student Union, Eagle 
Ambassadors, Educational 
Opportunities Program and 
several others. Now he is 
also adding the Board of 



Trustees to his wide variety 
of clubs. 

As the student trustee, 
Tarpley has responsibilities 
such as being involved with 
facilities, viewing and 
checking progress of various 
campus facilities, academic 
standards, enrollment stan- 
dards and he has say in 
approving the budgets, as 
well as other responsibili- 
ties. Personally, Tarplay is 
most interested in voicing 
the concerns of the students 
through the senates and 
back to the board of 




Ronald Tarpley 



trustees. 

Already Tarpley has pro- 
posed a couple of new ideas 
to the board. One request 
was for the smoking areas 
outside of the buildings to 
be moved farther from the 
dorms. Another proposal 
from Tarpley is to have a 
policy for people who need 



to take classes that are no 
longer available. 

"I believe I can be a very 
strong representation of the 
student body," said Tapley, 
"I have a heavy interest in 
politics and have been 
involved with nine different 
activities. I feel I could bet- 
ter serve [the University] as 
student trustee." 

Tarpley had to go through 
a long process in order to 
become student trustee. 
The first step was to com- 
plete an application, includ- 
ing letters of recommenda- 
tion. The next step included 
an interview with a search 
committee that included 
faculty members, adminis- 
tration and students. 
Following this Tarpley had 
an interview with the 
Clarion University 

President, Joseph 

Grunenwald. Tarpley had 
to go before a committee 
from the Office of the 
Chancellor of the 
Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education Board 
of Governors, a trustee and 
assistants from the Office of 
the Chancellor of the 
Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education. After a 
lot of paper work, Governor 
Rendell appointed Tarpley 
the student trustee until he 



graduates. 

"I felt like I was able to 
bring things from different 
clubs to the board." Tarpley 
replied to why he thought 
he was most suitable for the 
job. He continued on saying, 
"I can help bring what the 
students are looking for." 

After graduation Tarpley 
plans to attend graduate 
school for public policy. He 
would then like to start 
working, hoping one day to 
become a politician, while 
working on his doctorate. 

"The position of power will 
help me in the future," com- 
mented Tarpley, "Decisions 
trustees make effect the 
whole school." 

Tarpley believes being the 
student trustee will be an 
excellent experience for him 
and benefit him in the 
future. He enjoys meeting 
the new people and learning 
all he can from this experi- 
ence. 

"It is a lot of work, but I do 
not find it overwhelming. I 
am happy to be here and 
represent the school." 

In closing Tarpley com- 
mented to the student body 
sajdng, "I am excited to be 
here. I am always around in 
the Student Center, come 
grab me, do not be afraid to 
ask for anything." 



Chief Justice Wiiliam H. Reiinquist, Dead at 80 



David G. Savage 

Los Angeles Times-Washington Post 
News Service 

WASHINGTON, Sept. 4 - 
Chief Justice William H. 
Rehniquist, who stfeered the 
Supreme Court on a more 
conservative course during 
more than 33 years on the 
bench and who presided 
over the impeachment trial 
of one president and helped 
elect another, died Saturday 
at his home in Arhngton, 
Va. He was 80. 

Rehnquist had been in 
failing health since he was 
diagnosed last October with 
thyroid cancer. An 
announcement from the 
court late Saturday said the 
chief justice had experi- 
enced "a precipitous decline 
in his health in the last cou- 
ple of days" and died in the 
evening surrounded by his 
three children. 

Rehnquist's death came 
on the eve of confirmation 
hearings for President 
Bush's first Supreme Court 
nominee. Judge John G. 
Roberts Jr., whose first job 
in Washington was as a 
clerk for then Justice 
Rehnquist. 

The president will now 
have a second seat to fill on 
the Supreme Court and the 
timing of Rehnquist's death 



may complicate the choice. 

Earlier this year, many 
conservatives in 

Washington had cited 
Roberts as a likely choice 
for chief justice had 
Rehnquist retired as expect- 
ed at the end of this year's 
term in late June. Instead, 
Justice Sandra Day 
O'Connor surprised the 
White House by announcing 
her retirement. 

About three weeks later, 
Bush then surprised many 
observers by nominating 
Roberts, rather than choos- 
ing a woman to fill the seat 
of the first woman to serve 
on the court. 

Rehnquist, an associate 
justice on the court from 
1972-86 and chief justice 
from 1986 on, refused to 
give in to his illness. He 
swore in President Bush for 
a second term in January 
and returned to the bench 
shortly afterward. 

Through he appeared 
weak and spoke with diffi- 
culty, the chief justice par- 
ticipated in the court's oral 
arguments and could be 
counted upon to ask several 
sharp questions. The other 
justices said he continued to 
handle his duties inside 
court, including leading the 
discussion at the court's pri- 
vate conference. 

When the court interpret- 
ed the Civil Rights Act to 



allow employers to use 
"affirmative" discrimination 
in favor of minorities, 
Rehnquist called the major- 
ity's opinion "a tour de force 
reminiscent not of jurists 
such as (Oliver Wendell) 
Holmes or (Charles Evans) 
Hughes, but of escape 
artists such as Houdini." 

In 1986, the dismayed dis- 
senter became the chief jus- 
tice when Warren E. 
Burger, a Nixon appointee 
who had led a fractured 
court for 17 years, 



ii. 



...a tour de force remi- 
niscent not of jurists 
such as Holmes or 
Hughes, but of escape 
artists such as Houdini 
- William H. Rehnqu ist 



announced he was retiring, 
and President Reagan pro- 
moted Rehnquist to take his 
place. Senate Democrats 
contended Rehnquist was 
too conservative and "out of 
the mainstream," but he 
won confirmation on a 65- 
33 vote. 

As chief justice, Rehnquist 
pressed to give states more 
leeway to enforce their 



laws. The court regularly 
rejected challenges to the 
death penalty and made it 
easier for states to carry out 
executions. 

However, Rehnquist failed 
to win a majority to over- 
turn the abortion right 
affirmed in Roe vs. Wade. In 
1989, he wrote an opinion in 
a Missouri case saying 
states could enact laws to 
protect "potential human 
life." But at the last minute, 
O'Connor refused to sign his 
opinion, leaving the chief 
justice with only a four- 
member plurality of the 
court. 

Three years later, 
Rehnquist looked to have a 
solid majority to overturn 
the abortion right. In the 
interim, two liberals, 
Justices William J. 
Brennan and Thurgood 
Marshall, had retired and 
they were replaced by 
appointees of President 
George H.W. Bush: David 
H. Souter and Clarence 
Thomas. 

He is survived by his chil- 
dren, Janet Rehnquist of 
Arlington, Va., James C. 
Rehnquist of Sharon, Mass., 
and Nancy Spears of 
Middlebury, Vermont; his 
sister, Jean Laurin of Grand 
Rapids, Mich, and nine 
grandchildren. 



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"The Clarion Call" provides a 8)mop8i8 of all criminal 
investigations as conducted by the Clarion University 
Public Safety for the month of August 2005. All infor- 
mation can be accessed on the Public Safety webpage. 

■ Andre Stewart. 21, of Youngstown, Pa., parked in a 
handicapped parking space in lot E. Through investi- 
gation the officer found out that the decal was stolon. 

■ A male employee had his wallet taken from the 
men's locker room at Tippin Gymnasium! anyone hav- 
ing any information should contact Public Safety 

■ Campus Police investigating the report of a resident 
of Becht Hall made that $250 had been removed from 
her room. 

■ An unknown female was heard using obscene lan- 
guage by lot 9 on Wood Street. She became disorderly 
with a male who confronted her about her conduct. 
Anyone with information is asked to contact Public 
Safety. 



Clarion on Alert 



Lindsay Grystar 
Staff writer 

s_llgrystar@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 6 - The 
Clarion Borough Police 
Department is investigat- 
ing three robberies that 
occurred during the past 
week in the Clarion area, 
including the assault of a 
Clarion University stu- 
dent. 

In all three robberies, 
the suspect was a white 
male wearing a blue ski 
mask, carrying a gun or 
club. Two individuals 
were approached on the 
street, while the other 
robbery took place at a 
local business. All 
three incidents took place 
near Main Street in 
Clarion, between the 
hours of 11 p.m. and 2 
a.m. 



One Clarion University 
student was struck in the 
arm with a club, but was 
not seriously injured. The 
student refused medical 
attention. 

"Hopefully we will catch 
this guy and it will be 
resolved soon," said 

Clarion Borough Police 
Chief Mark E. Hall. 

The Police borough rec- 
ommends using caution 
when walking at night 
and urges students to 
walk in pairs. The 
Clarion Public Safety 
Office also offers an 
escort service anywhere 
on campus. To get an 
escort, call the 
Public Safety Office at 
393-2111, or from any 
emergency phone on cam- 
pus. 

"Practice personal safety 
and if you feel unsafe or 
see anything call 
911," added Hall. 



TREE SPEECH " continued from front 
page 



of concerned Americans 
about the threats to these 
rights on our campuses and 
about the means to preserve 
them." 

"They are nationally 
known as being non parti- 
san. All they care about is 
protecting the right to free 
speech," said Armstrong, 
"no one can accuse them of 
being some right-wing nut 
group and they have gra- 
ciously offered as much help 
as we need." 

According to Rep. 
Armstrong approximately 
$2 billion a year is taken 
from taxpayer dollars to 
give to higher education 



and the circulation of this 
money is made based upon 
an unsubstantial amount of 
appropriations committee 
meetings a year. 

"We in the legislature 
have a fiduciary responsi- 
bility to look at what's going 
on in the state system," said 
Armstrong. 

The committee will be cre- 
ated by the Academic 
Freedom subcommittee and 
will be comprised of bi-par- 
tisan members of the state 
house of representatives. 

According to Rep. 
Armstrong, action from the 
committee can be expected 
in early fall. 



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T| | yUkWON CALL 



Page 3 




THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex. Clarfon, PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

Web: clarioncall.ciarion.edu E-mali: cail@ciarlon.edy 



Ekecuttve Boaid 

Tom McMeekin, Melissa Hollier, 

EdItor-ln-Chief Photography Editor 


Dan Edington, 
Managing Editor 


Jamie Ranagan, 
Business Manager 


John Santa, 
News Editor 


Chelsey Hummel, 
Ad Sales Manager 


Ashley E. Angle, 
Features Editor 


Ashley Boynes, 
Advertising Designer 


Josh Woods, 
Sports Editor 


TinaSlckler, 
On-line Editor 


Jeannette Good, 
Co|^ & Design Editor 


Paul Anderson, 
Circulation Manager 



Staff 

Lorie Abraham, Ryan Aloia, Arabri Alexander, 
Jennifer Angelos, Michael Balchin, Kerri BalUna, 
David Banks, Adam Bauer, Eddie Baumcratz, Jason 
Bice, Lindsay Bradway, Elisa Borger, Eric Bowser, 
Kurt Boyd, Katie BuUers, Daniel Burr, Kimberly 
Cammuao, Ashley Carter, Tyler Crissman, Jonathan 
Cofer, Kevin Colonna, Ryan Cornman, Brandon 
Devennie, Hilary Dieter, Jonathan Donelli, Jeffrey 
Donston, Sean Dreher, Jonathan Egbert, Lori 
Elmquist, Katie Fischer, Audrey Fiske, Danielle Gais, 
Shawn Glancy, Lindsay Grusteur, Janelle Hartle, 
Chris Hofer, Sara Hoover. Shandrial Hudson, Lauren 
Maceli, Martin Johnson, Jennifer Kalgren, Emma 
Kelly, Beth Kibler, Brittnee Koebler, Jason Kooser, 
Shasta Kurtz, Joe Kuszaj, Chris McKissick, Nicole 
Meyer, Jim Miller, Heather Moore Kristen Pavlovich, 
Mollie Pifer, Amy Piroga, Morris Pratt, Elizabeth 
Presutti, Zach Ramsey, Stephanie Rawson, Ryan 
Rhoades, Jeffry Richards, Sarah Roesch, Roberta 
Rosati, Lisa Sagan, Lindsey Schnieder, Jared Sheatz, 
Vicki Sheeler, Jennifer Shetter, Melody Simpson, 
Nathan Stahlman, Kristen Staley, Darrell Stanyard, 
Marc Steigerwald, Tom Steinhagen, Lindsay 
Sturgeon, Kirwin Sutherland, Matt Topolski, Ariel 
Weaver, Kevin Wetter, Kimberly Wheeler, Pam 
Wherry, Amber White, Jimi Wikander, Ryan Wolfe, 
Devon Yorkshire, Jessica Zelinsky 

Policies 

The Clarion Call is the student-run newspaper of 
Clarion University of Pennsylvania and the surround- 
ing communities. The Call is published most 
Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but 
reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, punctua- 
tion, length and obscenity, the determination of which 
is the responsibiUty of the Editor-in-Chief. 

Opinions expressed in this paper are those of the 
writer or speaker, and do not necessarily reflect the 
opinions of the newspaper staff, student body, Clarion 
University or the community. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact 
information. They must be received no later than 5 
p.m. Mondays. If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonymous, they must attach a separate let- 
ter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are accepted 
based on available space and published at the discre- 
tion of the Executive Board. Publication is not guaran- 
nteed. 

Communication majors may earn co-curricular cred- 
it as a member of The Call staff. They should schedule 
their co-curricular when scheduling classes. Only stu- 
dents who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire 
semester will earn their co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue 
and the Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout 
Clarion. One copy is free; additional copies are $1.00. 



Lftos to tJie ulilor are wkm. M tlif m io rail @(liirion.(!Jn or drop tiiem off at 270 lieminpii todan! 

"I'm maturing . . . Reluctantly" 



by Paul Anderson 
Circulation Manager 

s_pmandersonfflclarion.edu 

In a week, roughly, I'll be 
22 and suddenly, drinking 
legally and puking said 
drinking the next morning 
will lose its appeal. Well, it 
lost its appeal fairly early 
on last year. I like to drink, 
but being carded isn't so 
novel after the second or 
third time. However, 10 
years from now, I'll proba- 
bly be glad to be carded and 
feel young. I don't know. I 
know women feel that way 
(if commercials have any 
truth to them and they've 
not lied to me yet! side note: 
I'm going to start using 
tampons so I can learn how 
to ride a horse), but I'm not 
sure about guys. Is feeling 
young a guy thing? Ask me 
when I'm 44 and trying to 
pick up 20-year-old coeds 
while perfecting my comb- 
over. How ya doin', honey? 

A year from now, I'll prob- 
ably have a job as a high 
school English teacher, edu- 
cating the leaders of tomor- 
row as to why "Death of a 
Salesman" is important for 
them to know when they're 
building tax shelters later 




on in life. This means that 
now, I have to grow up. Lose 
the chain wallet, start pop- 
ping TicTacs so I don't smell 
like an ashtray so much (or 
quit smoking entirely, but 
I'm working on that), and 
stop wearing band T-shirts. 
Converse will no longer be 
the official sponsor of my 
feet. No more bear-foot slip- 
pers to shuffle around in. 

Some of this has already 
started to happen. I have a 
pair of Dockers shoes 
(they're water-proof!), and I 
lost the chain back at the 
end of July. I have a nice 
collection of ties, and now I 
have to remember how to 
tie a damn Windsor knot. 

But maturing is more 
than materialism. Yes, I 
may seriously be consider- 
ing buying a Foreman Grill, 
but that doesn't change the 



The 
"JDumping 

jGround 



fact that I still obsess about 
my record collection more 
than I should. Nice shirts 
(put together, they look like 
the gay pride rainbow-no 
more black cotton) don't 
erase the fact that some- 
times I wish I was still 
young enough to play with 
my action figures. I still 
enjoy the articles in 
"Weekly Worid News." How 
mature can you be when 
"Bat Boy" holds your atten- 
tion for longer than 10 sec- 
onds? 

I still have to learn not to 
consciously get in someone's 
face when they irritate me. 
Instead of some fundamen- 
talist bombing abortion 
clinics in an act of God's 
Greatest Irony, I must be 
more of a Hindu terrorist, 
setting myself on fire to 
make you deal with your- 



self. That probably didn't 
sound right, but what I 
mean is that I have to tamp 
my attitude down, get some 
good karma and mellow out. 
This is harder than it 
sounds. I may have been 
unconsciously right with 
the self- spontaneous 
combustion joke (and, if you 
didn't get it, look up Rage 
Against the Machine's first 
album cover). 

But I'm learning and I feel 
like a Toyota Prius or one of 
those other hybrid cars. 
Right now, I'm not a horse 
or a donkey, but just one 
ugly-ass mule. I'm mature 
enough to worry about bills 
and how clean my bathroom 
is, even if there's a Nirvana 
poster I've had since I was 
14 stuck to the door. I'm 
mature enough to be seri- 
ously thinking about mar- 
riage and paying two-grand 
for an engagement ring 
because the price of admis- 
sion is worth it. I even put 
my Fountains of Wayne 
posters in frames, in 
frames, mind you, and that 
is the epitome of maturity. 
Right? Right? Screw you, 
guys. 



Hope and Mingle in Native of New Orieans 



Courtland IVIilloy 
The Washington Post 

WASHINGTON-Jeremy 
Broussard was helping to 
load minivans with bags of 
clothes and food that had 
been donated for victims of 
Hurricane Katrina. The 
drop-off site was the 
Howard University Law 
School in Northwest 
Washington, where he is a 
second-year student and 
vice president of his class. 

He began organizing the 
relief effort even before the 
hurricane made landfall 
and was still at it Monday, 
after learning that his home 
in New Orleans' Lower 9th 
Ward had been destroyed by 
floodwaters. 

"I'm sure there'll come a 
time when the reality of it 
all hits me and I'll break 
down," said Broussard, 28. 
"But now is not the time." 

Now was the time for 
courage, not hopelessness 
and despair. In an obvious 
show of optimism, he wore a 
T-shirt bearing the insignia 
of the New Orleans Saints, 
a hard-luck football team 
whose home (the 

Superdome) was a designat- 
ed storm shelter-turned- 
national symbol of man's 
inhumanity to man. 



'This could be our year," 
he said of the Saints. "You 
never know." 

Broussard was the can-do 
spirit personified. Before 
coming to Howard, he was 
an Army ROTC cadet and 
political science major at 
Hampton University in 
Virginia. 

After graduating first in 
hi^ ciass in , 1999, he , ,was 
commis^ioped as ^, .field 
artillery officer, attended 
airborne school at Fort 
Benning, Ga., and was sta- 
tioned at Fort Bragg, N.C., 
before being deployed to 
Iraq. 

"One of the most impor- 
tant lessons I learned in the 
Army is that you'd be sur- 
prised at how much you can 
do if you just do it," he said. 
Ironically, federal officials 
responsible for emergency 
preparedness had not 
learned the lesson. The 
response to the catastrophe 
was halfhearted and disin- 
tegrated into a blame game. 
None of the officials 
showed the kind of leader- 
ship that Broussard had 
come to value as an Army 
officer, and he is horrified at 
the prospect that many of 
his neighbors may have lost 
their lives because of incom- 
petence and ineptitude. 

"I read the warnings in 
the New Orleans Times- 



Picayune and immediately 
began e-mailing people 
from Louisiana who live in 
the Washington area," 
Broussard recalled. "The 
newspaper predicted that 
Katrina was powerful 
enough to destroy the city. 
... Nobody should have been 
surprised." 

The Times-Picayune fore- 
cast updated a series that 
raji in 2002 and began with 
the now prophetic headline^ 
"In Harm's Way^ Levees, 
our best protection from 
flooding, may turn against 
us." 



Broussard said the disas- 
ter would not have been as 
severe had it not been for 
"the Bush ideology," which 
he believes feeds the greed 
of the rich instead of the 
needs of the poor. 

"I believe," he said, "we 
are witnessing the impact of 
that ideology in New 
Orleans, where there has 
been a whirlwind of suffer- 
ing caused by a lack of fed- 
eral funds for flood preven- 
tion and a stunning indif- 
ference to that suffering by 
those government officials 
who withheld the funds." 



Theta^Phi Alpha* 

^rv? A^ , ..-v* iraternity 




Theta Phi Alpha Fnrtemify is seeking energetic, dynamic 
women. We hope to see you at the following events: 

Monday, September 12th: 146 Gemmell 5:00-10:00 
Theta Phi Alpha Premiere 

Tuesday, September 131h: 146 Gemmell 7:00-7:45 / 9:00-9:45 
Housewarming party-an introduction to Theta Phi Alpha Fraternity 

Wednesday, September 14th: 250/252 Gemmell 
7:00-7:45 or 9:00-9:45, Join us to learn about the 'ABCs of TPA," 

Invitational parties talte place on Thursday, September 15, and Friday, 

September 16. 

Don't miss out on a terrific opportunity to become involved in a nevirty reorganized 

chapter! 

For more information, please contact Shelly, National Reorganization Chairman, at 

(513) 478-5092 or 6trolls@fuse,net. For information on Theta Phi Alpha Fraternity, 

visit our website at www.thetaphialphaorg. 




Amber Shore 

Freshman, Elemi-ntary Educ ation 

"Took a four day vacation for a wedding all 
by myself." 



Call on You 



by Devon Yorkshire 

"What was the best thing you did this summer?" 



Ashley John.son 

Senior, Graphic Design 

"Went to Virginia Beach and spent 
time with family." 






Elizabeth Linnon 

Returning Adult, Ceramics 

"Took my son to the Pittsburgh Zoo." 



Branden Kadance 

Senior, Sculpture 

"Got out of Clarion." 




DuANE Hemphill 

Freshman, Business Management 

"Played All-Star football game (city vs. coun- 
ty) and won." 



Braxton White 

Freshman, Sec. Ed. Math 

"Went to Cedar Point with some friends 
right before school." 




Page 4 



TK CLABl^CALL 



September 8. 2005 




'Eyrie' magazine provides iink to Clarion community 



Ashley E. Angle 
Features Editor 



"Coyote Ugly," "Aye Aye 
Captain," "A 50 Year Dream 
Turned To Reality" read the 
cover of the "Eyrie." Bright 
orange leaves don the 
glossy cover, showcasing 
just one of Clarion's natural 
beauties. The "Eyrie," 
Clarion University's 

magazine, is quickly 
becoming known as the uni- 
versity's community con- 
nection. Though a relatively 
new publication, "Eyrie" 
staff members have very 
clear ideas as to where it 
has been, what it is now and 
where it is going. 

Since its creation the focus 
of the "Eyrie" has provided 
a link between Clarion 
University and the commu- 
nity The "Eyrie" is an 
archive of history and 
events, and allows both stu- 
dents and community mem- 
bers to learn more about the 
town. 

"As the editor-in-chief, it's 
my intention to continue to 
capture the unique places, 
events and history that the 
Clarion community knows 
as home," said Editor-in- 
Chief, graduate student 
Jess Shirey. 

HISTORY 

The "Eyrie" was started in 
2000 by Dr. Arthur Barlow, 
professor of communcation. 
However, the first issue was 
not published until Spring 
2002. Students John Gerow 
and John Crawford worked 



alongside Dr. Barlow to 
build a staff and create a 
vision for the Eyrie. 

"I saw the need for superi- 
or student writing," said 
Barlow. 

The "Eyrie" was also cre- 
ated to give communication 
majors a choice as far as 
their print co-curricular. 
Barlow said it is "exciting to 
work with dynamic individ- 
uals in a creative venture." 
Perhaps one if their first 
tasks was coming up with a 
name. 

"The name comes from 
Clarion University's Golden 
Eagle mascot," said Shirey. 
"Eyrie means an eagle's 
nest or high place. It's very 
symbolic of the original idea 
and vision behind the mag- 
azine." 

The "Eyrie" first started 
out with half a dozen staff 
members, but has grown 
into about twenty. It was 
also a place for students to 
showcase their photogra- 
phy, writing and graphic art 
talents. 

NOW 

The "Eyrie" has changed 
in many ways since it was 
created and is still chang- 
ing. Originally, the "Eyrie' 
consisted of a small and 
inexperienced staff. One or 
two students were in charge 
of layout, which has drasti- 
cally changed. Layout used 
to consist of a headline, text 
and picture. 

This year the "Eyrie" will 
be single spaced instead of 
double and more graphic 
design will be added. 



"It's our vision that future 
issues look more like a mag- 
azine," Shirey said. 

Although currently the 
"Eyrie" does not have an 
executive board beyond edi- 
tors Shirey and Dustin 
Major, the staff has grown 
in size. Students can get 
involved in several ways 
including writing, photogra- 
phy, public relations, adver- 
tising and design. Shirey 
said that the growth in 
the staff has, "allowed us T 
to collaborate and be more 
creative." 



opportunity to work in the 
production of a high quality 
periodical publication," said 
Shirey. "It's our hope that 
this experience will prove to 
be an invaluable one for 
those who wish to pursue a 
career in journalism." 

The publication prints 
once a year, usually in the 
spring, but this year 
it will be 



gives it a direct link and 
connection to the communi- 
cation department. 

This semester, 600 copies 
of the "Eyrie" will be print- 
ed. In the past. 1,000 had 
been printed. The number 
was cut down in order to 
have it printed in full color. 



U 



From work- 
ing with Or. 
Barlow on the 
'Eyrie, ' I've 
come to devel- 
op the same 
passion and 
love for the mag- 
azine that he has. 
It just means so 
much to me, and I 
have this big 
dream and plan for 
the 'Eyrie' 
magazine. 
- Jess Shirey 




» 



By working for the 
"Eyrie", staff members can 
earn their print co-curricu- 
lar, learn to work in a team 
environment and learn to 
edit and design a magazine. 
"It affords students the 



printed 
* twice. Due poor to 

decision making and 
lack of communication, the 
"Eyrie" did not print last 
semester. Issue four, which 
was supposed to print last 
year, will be printed this 
semester around Autumn 
Leaf time. An issue is also 
planned for spring semes- 
ter. 

The "Eyrie" is housed in 
G83 Becker Hall which 



GOALS 

Once a student's submis- 
sion is accepted, the real 
work begins. That student 
works with the editors and 
executive board of the 
"Eyrie" work to cut down 
and clean up the article to 
make it publishable. It is 
this material that is then 
seen by the community. 

In order to connect even 
more with the community, 



they hope to sponsor a high 
school essay contest. The 
circulation staff plans to 
focus on distributing to den- 
tists and doctors offices, 
hospital and hotels. They 
are also looking to distrib- 
ute copies to rest areas 
along Interstate 80. 

"We want to reach our tar- 
geted audience, but we 
want to achieve 
multiple 
readerships 
in doing so," 
said Shirey 
One of the 
"Eyrie's" main 
goals this year is 
to sell more 
advertising. As of 
last issue, the 
communiction 
department was 
helping the "Eyrie" 
with bills. It is 
Shirey's vision to 
have the "Eyrie" 
funded the way profes- 
sional magazines are fund- 
ed - solely on advertising 
sales. 

"From working with Dr. 
Barlow on the "Eyrie," I've 
come to develop the same 
passion and love for the 
magazine that he has. It 
just means so much to me, 
and I have this big dream 
and plan for the "Eyrie" 
magazine. I literally sit and 
dream about the Eyriei I 
have all these ideas and I 
can't wait to make them a 
reality. It's just an honor 
that Dr. Barlow has given 
me this opportunity, and 
I'm definitely going to con- 
tinue his original vision," 
Shirey said. 



Golden Spike Scholarship createdtor volleyball players 



Kevin Wetter 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Clarion University will 
offer a new scholarshiop 
next year. Clarion Univrsity 
graduates Chuck and Jane 
McLaughlin established the 
"Golden Spike" scholarship 
in honor of Jane's father, 
Johnny Garneau. 

The "Golden Spike" schol- 
arship which was named 
after one of Garneau's cor- 
porations is only available 
to freshman volleyball play- 
ers. It is worth $1,000. The 
scholarship is not going to 
be awarded until next year. 

Clarion University volley- 
ball coach Tracy Fluharty 
stated, "Right now the 
scholarship is put into a 
fund that is going to gain 
interest over time. No stu- 
dent is on it, it is just a 
donation by alumni. Next 



year will be the first year it 
is awarded." 

Fluharty has a say in 
which incoming freshman 
will receive the scholarship. 
"I'm not only looking for 




Photo courtesy Clarion University 
Sports information 

Head volleyball coach, 
Tracy Fluhary, helps pick 
the scholarship recipient. 

someone that excels in the 
sport of volleyball but also 
has a good G.P.A and are in 
good academic standing," 
she said. 



The special thing about 
the scholarship is that it 
recognizes the athletic 
accomplishments of 

Garneau's grandchildren, 
Megan, CJ, and Kayley 
McLaughhn. 

Garneau was a renowned 
restaurant owner who was 
very close to the Clarion 
community. "Dad's 83rd 
birthday is coming up and 
we wanted to honor him in 
the community where we 
were raised," commented 
Jane McLaughhn. 

Not only did Garneau 
have restaurants in 
Clarion, Pittsburgh, 

Youngstown, Cleveland and 
South Florida he was also 
one of the founding fathers 
of the well-known Autumn 
Leaf Festival, a favorite 
among Clarion University 
students. 

Garneau started out as 
"soda jerk" and went on to 



own his first real restaurant 
The Beanery. By the end of 
his career, Garneau served 
as president of two major 
corporations, Johnny 

Garneau's Golden Spike of 
America, Inc. and Safe Food 
Systems, Inc. Garneau's 
career wasn't all smooth 
sailing though. A devastat- 
ing fire transformed his 
first building from a six- 
stool short order diner into 
a heaping pile of debris and 
ashes. 

After the fire Garneau 
rebuilt a larger building 
and served his food a new 
kind a way, as a smorgas- 
bord. In the early 1950s this 
new style was well received 
by customers and soon 
caught on with other 
restaurants. For his out- 
standing achievements in 
the food service business 
Garneau was inducted into 
the Hospitality Magazine's 



"Hall of Fame" in 1969. 

The McLaughlins must 
have learned a thing or two 
about restaurants from 
Garneau because they own 
and operate a very popular 
restaurant in Lighthouse 
Point, Fla. called Bonefish 
Mac's Sport Grille. 

"His creativity was an 
inspiration to me," says 
Chuck McLaughhn. The 
McLaughlins have been 
involved in the food busi- 
ness for over 25 years and 
owned one of the largest 
food brokerages in the 
Florida area. 

It seems that some of 
Garneau's pioneer ideas 
rubbed off on the 
McLaughlins. Their restau- 
rant includes 24 beers on 
tap, curbside pickup for 



take out and closed circuit 
televisions that monitor the 
game room. Parents can 
enjoy drinks at the bar all 
while watching their chil- 
dren. 

Jane has been a city com- 
missioner for several years 
and held a recent position 
as the executive director for 
a charity against child 
abuse, Hugs for Kids. The 
McLaughlins are big sup- 
porters of charities. They 
have raised more than 
$100,000 for local charities. 
They managed to do this 
through sponsorships, 

donations and "Celebrity 
Bartender." 



KM A offers new take on community service 



Amber White 
C/ar/onCa// Staff Writer 



Led by junior Sam 
Krigbaum, "Keeping Minds 
Aware" (KMA) is a new 
community service organi- 
zation that promises to be 
different than any other 
organization on campus. 

The idea started last fall, 
when Krigbaum, then a res- 
ident advisor, heard from a 
few people on her floor that 
they wanted to start a club. 
The group discussed what 
sorts of things this club 
would do, what they wanted 
from it, and how it would be 
different from other organi- 
zations on campus, and 
eventually they came up 
with the idea for KMA. 
Some of the originators 
dropped out through the 
process, but those that 
remained completed every- 



thing that was needed to 
become a recognized stu- 
dent organization. Papers 
were filled out and handed 
in by the end of the 2005 
spring semester, and 
though they are not yet offi- 
cially a recognized student 
organization, all they have 
to wait for is word from stu- 
dent senate. 

The term "community 
service" usually brings to 
mind images of picking up 
trash or painting old build- 
ings. What makes KMA dif- 
ferent is its aim to provide 
educational programs that 
are geared toward college 
students. Popular topics 
are researched by the 
group, and then presented 
free of charge to the cam- 
pus. 

For example, at the start 
of October KMA will be pre- 
senting "The Art of Self 
Love," which deals with-yes, 
that's right-masturbation. 



It's a topic everyone is curi- 
ous about, Krigbaum says, 
yet one that most are afraid 
to ask about. The event is 
broken down into two parts, 
the first being an informa- 
tive presentation, and the 
second being more 'interac- 
tive.' Audience members 
will be placed into groups 
for various exercises (noth- 
ing too explicit), and the 
event will end with a ques- 
tion and answer session. 
For this particular event, 
KMA will be working with 
the Interhall Council. The 
tentative date for it is 
Monday, Oct. 2 at 9 p.m. 

Another goal of KMA is to 
get rid of the belief that 
there's nothing to do on 
campus. They plan to col- 
laborate with other organi- 
zations and create more 
events for students. 

Events are planned in 
committees, with the origi- 
nal ideas coming to the 



executive board and then 
branching down from there. 
There are two vice presi- 
dents of the organization, 
one for internal and one for 
external affairs. They are 
each in charge of different 
aspects of the planning 
process. 

Anyone interested in 
learning more about this 
group is welcome to attend 
their meeting on Monday, 
Sept. 12 at 9 p.m. in room 
110 Gemmell. 



TOINONO ABOUT lAW SOHOOL? 

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Find out by taking a FREE practice 

exam. 

The Political Science Department will be 

sponsoring a free practice exam. 

Time: 8:30 a.m. 

Date: Saturday, September 17, 2005 

Place: 118 Founders Hall 

See Dr. Sweet in Room 306 Founders 

Hall by September 15th to sign up. Or, 

email him at bsweet0clarion.edu 



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September 8. 2005 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



Page 5 



'Fall Into Fitness' program gears up for new school year 



Jeff Donston 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

For thos(> students that 
have been sitting around all 
summer getting tan and for 
those freshman that are 
fearing those frightening 
15, it's that time of year 
again to get up and dust off 
the workout clothes; 
Clarion University's 

"Spring Into Fitness, Fall 
Into Shape" program is 
back. 
Starting the weok of Sept. 



18 the Keeling Health 
Center and the University 
Student Recreation Center 
are beginning their third 
year of the 12 week nutri- 
tion and fitness program. 
The program began three 
years ago to help Clarion 
University do their part in 
the Healthy Campus 2010 
campaign. 

Healthy Campus 2010 
was started by the 
American College Health 
Association. It was created 
as a task force on national 



ASK DOCTOR EAGLE 



Dear Dr. Eagle, 

I am a freshman this 
year and I have been very 
homesick. I have made 
some new Mends, but it is 
not hoping. Do you have 
any tips that can help me 
(K>pe with my homesick- 

ZM88? 



Dear Homesick, 

Most college students 
have been homesick at one 
point in time, so do not feel 
like you are alone. Here 
are some tips that can help 
you cope with your home- 
sickness. 

Talk about it with your 
friends. Chances are they 
are feeling the same way 
you do. You and your 
friends can also get 
involved in UAB and Hall 
Council. This will allow 
you to meet new people 
and become involved in 
activities on campus. 

Bring familiar items 
from home! such as pho- 
tos, plants or a stuffed ani- 
mal. These items will 
make your room feel more 
at home. If you decorate 
your room the way you like 
it you will feel comfortable 
in it. 

It also helps to plan a ' 



date to go home. Pick one 
weekend to go home and 
stick to that date. Right 
now you may feel like you 
want to go home every 
weekend, but that may not 
help your homesickness. 
There are many activities 
that go on during the 
weekends that are fun and 
entertaining. Family Day 
is coming up on September 
17 so ask your family to 
come for the day. There are 
activities planned all day 
and a football game that 
night. 

If you are homesick and 
you find you cannot cope, 
the Counseling Center on 
campus may be able to 
help. They deal with this 
frequently in large num- 
bers and can offer assis- 
tance to you. You can con- 
tact the Counseling Center 
at x2255. You may also 
consider joining Campus 
Ministry. They may also be 
able to help you cope with 
your homesickness. 

Doctor Eagle is written by 

S&rab Wil$on, of the 

Keeling Health Center. 

For more information or to 

suggest a topic, please 

contact her at * ,» 
« i' .11 

8_smwilson0clkrion.edu. 



health objectives. According 
to the task force on national 
health objectives. Healthy 
Campus 2010 was created 
to identify appropriate, 
measurable objectives, rec- 
ommend strategies to 
achieve objectives. It also 
serves to identify methods 
to measure progress, pro- 
vide information about 
progress and identify and 
promote effective programs 
and strategies. Clarion 
University does its part to 
promote effective programs 
by offering the "Fall Into 
Shape" 
program. 

In addition to doing its 
part in the Healthy Campus 
2010 campaign, the "Fall 
Into Shape" program was 
started because there was a 
need for a program like this 
on campus. According to a 
survey done by the National 
College Health Assessment 
done in the spring of 2004 of 
over 47,000 students 
nationwide, 17 percent of 
females and 29 percent of 
males were overweight, 
while about eight percent 
males and five percent 
females were considered 
class one obese. 

The "Fall Into Shape" pro- 
gram brings students and 
staff together to exercise 
and motivate each other to 
get in better shape. The 



class enables dedicated stu- 
dents to meet others with 
the same goals. By working 
together they help each 
other stay on task and stay 
motivated. 

Darlene Hartle, a regis- 
tered nurse and head of 
Health Promotions and 
Programs at Keeling said, 
"The goal behind the pro- 
gram is to give the people 
enrolled in the program 



ti 



The goal behind 
the program is to 
give the people 
enrolled in the pro- 
gram knowledge 
about nutrition 
and to help moti- 
vate them. " 

- Darlene Hartle 
» 



knowledge about nutrition 
and to help motivate them." 
Hartle also said, "People 
who exercise tend to be less 
sick and overall feel better." 
Students enrolled in the 
program will be given a 12 
week weight loss goal based 
on their height and weight. 
The program includes 
weekly weigh-ins and, 




Clarion Call File Pfioto 

Work out equipment helps students fall into 
fitness. 



starting this year, an aero- 
bics classes each week. 
Students will also have the 
chance to win small prizes 
based on their attendance 
and achievements. However 
the ultimate prize is losing 
the weight and feeling bet- 
ter about oneself. 

Last year a senior psychol- 
ogj'/sociology major started 
working out more frequent- 
ly after starting the "Fall 
into Shape" program being 
run by Darlene Hartle and 
Doug Knepp. The student 
lost 60 pounds and made 
the dean's list both semes- 
ters. When asked about her 
success, the student, whose 
name will be withheld for 



privacy reasons, said, "I 
knew I had to get weighed 
in each week and I walk a 
lot now and eat low calorie 
foods and eat less." She con- 
tributed her success to the 
motivation and information 
received in the "Fall Into 
Shape" program. This stu- 
dent also claims she now 
feels better about herself, 
has more confidence in 
school, sleeps better and 
feels healthier 

The "Fall Into Shape" pro- 
gram is open to all students. 
"Anyone can sign up," 
Hartle said. 

Be on the look out for 
more information in cam- 
pus e-mail. 



If you are Interested in jolnihg 777e Clarion Call 
staff please contact us at call@clarJon.edu or 

x2380.v^•:::^;:::-;:::•^:^^:^•:■v•:::K■•:;:-•^ 



F 



Family Health 
Council, Inc. 



1064A. East Main Street 

814-226-7500 
www.fticmc.org 



Providing birth control, emergency 

contraception and gyne .services. 

Free STD testing & treatment. 

Most in.sunmce plans accepted. 

Slidin}» scale lees for those without insurance. 

All services are confidential. 




Last Man Down 

FDNY Battalion 
Commander, Richard 
'Picotto spoke about his 
exprience as the last 
firefighter to escape 
the twin towers before 
they collapsed. 
Donations were 
accepted to benefit the 
Clarion Fire and Hose 
Company No. 1. 



Melissa Holller/r/ie Clarion Call 



Share your space, but live on your own. 




All furnishings pictured are from Wal-Mart 



Storage 



WAL-MART 

Get everything for your dorm room at Walmartcom and still afford tuition. always low prices. 



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TTffi CmtiQN CilLL 



September 8. 2005 




Qood & Random 

I missed the "Fantastic Four" phenomenon of this 
summer. In fact, I admit that I've been stuck in an 
entertainment bubble, where only classical music and 
few newly released films exist. I could formerly and may 
currently be found in a practice room in Marwick-Boyd, 
playing ray clarinet. However, this summer I decided to 
expand ray horizons m the field of entertainment. 

My brother started me on reading the "Left Behind" 
series, and I am currently finishing the third of 12. I 
started reading Erica Jong's "Fear of Flying" and Helen 
Fielding's "Olivia Joules." Reading "He's Just Not that 

Playing catch up '"'" ^°"" ^' "^""^'' 



Jeannette Good 

Copy and Design Editor 

sjmgoodflclarion.edu 



Boyfriends" by "Sex and 
the City" writers Greg 
Behrendt and Liz Tuccillo, 
and Cindy Chupack 
attracted me to previously 

' unwatched reruns of *'Sex 

and the City." Suddenly, I'm wondering if Carrie (Sarah 
Jessica Parker) will end up with Big (Chris Noth). 

In television interests, Brian is the name of the dog on 
"FamUy Guy." I dwelled on WB's "Gilmore Girls" which 
l^ra Harrington, former managing editor, raved about. 
MTV apparently becsme the new dating network with 
shows "Date My Mom," "Next" and "Room Raiders." 

I fell in love with "Mean Girls" ("Is butter a carb?') and 
realized how much I enjoy films targeted toward 
teenage girls like "A Cinderella Story." At least I start- 
ed quoting something other than "The Wedding Singer." 
I iBaally watched movies I should've seen in high 
school. "X-Men" and "X2" aren't so lame, afterall. Maybe 
now I will understand parts of Dan Edington's columns 
periodically printed on my pages. "Netting Hill" topped 
my old school movie charts. Many critics referred to it 
as cheesy and gave low ratings. Watching "Netting Hill" 
multiple times reunited ray film craze flame for Kevin 
Smith, director of "Clerks." "Willy Wonka" reminded me 
how twisted Tim Burton films turn out. 

At some point, I remembered that the band The 
Killers sings "Mr. Brightside" and "Smile Like You 
Mean It." Although I didn't make it to the Warped Tbur, 
I wanted to see Something Corporate, and I hear they 
play "Konstantine" at every show. I finally Ustened to 
the band Mae that Elisa Borger likes to write about. I 
met members of bands Practically Single and Honin. 
Did you know local bands are trying to create a scene? 
Spending a lot of time on the local theater scene, I 
played clarinet for the Clarion University production of 
"42nd Street" and went to see "Baby" and "You're a 
(5ood Man, Charlie Brown." I look forward to seeing 
Gabrielle Greco in future productions. I first remember 
iGreco from her role in the second series production 
'"Catholic School Girls" in May. 

Even approaching my fifth year at CUP, I have yet to 
jump off of the bridge. I still have a way to go. 



'Virgin' gives more tlian ending 




Nathan Stahlman 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Every man's nightmare is 
Andy Stitzer's (Steve 
Carell) life. He has a good 
job, a nice apartment and a 
large assortment of video 
games and coUectables. So 
why is Andy's life so terri- 
ble? He is 40 years old and 
has never "bumped uglies." 

When the guys from work 
find out about this tragedy 
they make it their personal 
mission to get Andy de-vir- 
ginized. After a few misfor- 
tunes Andy is ready to give 
up, when he meets Trish 
(Catherine Keener), a 
divorced mother of three 
who works across the street 



from him. All seems to be 
going well until Andy's 
nervousness takes control 
and the couple adopts a "no 
sex" policy. Andy's friends 
will stop at nothing to make 
it happen, even if it means 
hiring a prostitute, but can 
Andy handle the pressure? 
The ending is probably one 
of the best parts. It's more 
than the happy ending than 
we've come to expect from 
"romantic comedies." 

Finally another R- rated 
comedy has managed to slip 
under the Hollywood radar 
and make it through pro- 
duction for our viewing 
pleasure. This film is not 
afraid to be too funny. In 
"American Pie" style, it 
throws toilet humor and F- 
bombs out faster than you 
can take them in. Through 
most of the movie I didn't 
have time to stop laughing 
at one joke before I had to 
start laughing at the next 
one. The dialogue was great 
with witty humor and 
raunchy sex talk all 



wrapped up in a hilarious 
package. Why they don't 
release more comedies for 
people over the age of 13, I 
will never know. 

Steve Carell, formerly 
"Anchorman's" Brick 

Tamland, plays a perfectly 
awkward Andy Stitzer. His 
boyish innocence is only 
surpassed by his raw 
humor. It takes a real man 
to have his chest waxed in 
front of five cameras. The 
rest of the cast was just as 
amazing, including Paul 
Rudd, another "Anchorman" 
who played David, the 
heartbroken wannabe play- 
er. Andy's other friends, Jay 
(Romany Malco) and Cal 
(Seth Rogen), complete the 
perfect trio of horn ball sex 
fiends. Also, under-rated 
Catherine Keener plays the 
best "hot grandma" I've ever 
seen. 

This movie is hilarious. 
Aside from a few jokes 
being drawn out a little 
longer than needed you'll be 
laughing the entire time. If 




Lm Angela* Time* Photo/G. Friedman 

'40 Year-Old Virgin' - 

Steve Carell, top, with 
"40 Year-Old Virgir),' co- 
writer and director, Judd 
Apatow. 

you've been dying for a dirty 
laugh since the "American 
Pie" sequels weren't nearly 
as funny as the original, you 
should definitely go see this 
movie. If you don't see it on 
the big screen, make sure 
you see it when the DVD 
comes out. 



Slim Thug must for southern rap fans 



Jared Sheatz 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Slim Thug's album, 
"Already Platinum" is blow- 
ing up the Billboard Top 20. 
Executive Producers, The 
Neptunes and other produc- 
ers such as Jazze Pha, Sha 
Money XL from G-Unit, 
Black Jeruz, Cool Dre, and 
Houston's own Mr. Lee 
make this album a produc- 
tion masterpiece. Slim 
Thug hails from the north 
side of Houston, TX. H- 
Town seems to be the hot 
spot now days with Mike 



Jones, Paul Wall, Lil' Flip, 
etc. and not to forget the 
late great DJ Screw who 
arguably put Houston on 
the map with his Screwed 
and Chopped style. 

This album also has guest 
appearances by artists TL, 
Bun B, Pharrell, Boyz N 
Blue, Jazze Pha and Pusha- 
T of The Chpse This star- 
studded supporting cast is 
what helps take this album 
from the middle to the top. 
This list features some very 
talented rappers that Slim 
meshes with well. 

"Already Platinum" show- 
cases a variety of songs 



from the remix of "I Ain't 
Heard of That," featuring 
Bun B to "Dedicate," a song 
expressing losses Slim 
encountered in life. 

The Neptunes really show 
their talent on this album, 
providing the beats for 
"Like A Boss," "Playa You 
Don't Know," "This Is My 
Life" and more. "Boyz N 
Blue" is a strong song fea- 
turing his Boys N Blue 
squad: Killa Kyleon, Sir 
Daily, PJ and Chris Ward. 
Bun B and T.I. show their 
talents with Slim in "3 
Kings," a great song with 
three very talented south- 



ern lyricists. Jazze Pha 
graces us with his presence 
in "Incredible Feelin'." 

"Already Platinum" 
expresses the different 
styles of Slim Thug, and he 
considers himself to be a 
versatile rapper despite his 
Texas upbringing. 

This is a well produced 
album that shows the lyri- 
cal talents of Slim Thug, 
making it a must buy for 
any southern rap fan. 

Houston is blowing up the 
hip-hop scene today; their 
artists are becoming more 
popular every day. 




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September 8. 2005 



THE CLARION CALL 



Page 7 




lireek aJs, Travel Eiiiploviiipnl, For Ml hmmh and licnerdl ads 



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EMPLOYMENT 

Clarion Church seeking 
caring, responsible individ- 
ual for paid Child Care 
Provider position for nurs- 
ery (infants- age three), 
Sunday mornings and occa- 
sional evening events, at 
church. Act 33/34 

Clearances required. Pay 
based on experience. Send 
resumes to Child Care 
Provider, 240 Liberty 
Street, Clarion, PA 16214. 
Deadline Sept. 15. 

Classified ads are due by 6 
p.m. Tuesday the week 
they are to be published. 



Place a Classlfledl 

Classifications include: 

Greeks 

For Rent 

Employment 

Travel 

Personals 

General 

and special sections during 

events such as holidays. 

■ Cost is only 10 cents per 
word. 

■ Minimun ad cost $1 

■ Contact us or pick up a 
form outside our office. 

■ Pay when you request 
the ad or be billed at a 
later time. 




The Clarion Call/ Mallasa Holllei 

See what's out there- Rain can't keep students from 
checking out organizations during activities day. 



Graduate Scholarships Available 

The Ross Rankin and Family Graduate Scholarships will 
be offered for the Spring of 2006. The scholarship is open 
to full and part-time graduate students who will have 
completed at least nine graduate credit hours at Clarion 
University. Part-time students must be enrolled for at 
least six credits during the semester the funds will be 
used. Graduate students must be currently enrolled in 
one of the university's graduate programs and have com- 
pleted nine credit hours with at least a 3.0 QPA in their 
program. Applications are currently available in the 
Alumni Relations Offer, Center for Advancement, and 
the Graduate Studies Office in Carrier Administration. 
Applications are due by Oct. 3. 



Clarion County United Way 5K Race 

The United Way of Clarion County will hold its 21st 
Annual 5K Race on Saturday, October 10 as part of an 
Autumn Leaf Festival Event. The course stretches from 
Main Street, through the Autumn Leaf Festival area, 
around Clarion University Campus, and ending with a 
lap around the University track. Long sleeved t-shirts, 
boxed lunches from Sheetz, beverages from Wal-Mart 
and fruit from the Clarion Fruit Company will be provid- 
ed for the first 200 registered runners. Cash prizes total- 
ing up to $1200 will be awarded to the top three male and 
female runners. Medals will also be awarded in the dif- 
ferent age groups. Registration will begin at 7:30 a.m. at 
the stadium. The race begins at 9 a.m. and the cost is 
$15.00. Special discounts are being offered to 
femiJies/indiy^uaJ,^/fri|?n<;ls/co-w9rkers running together. 
If an organization, family, etc. has three individuals or 
more respresenting the cost is only $12.00 per runner. 
Anyone is able to participate, and all proceeds will bene- 
fit the Fitzgerald Ramp Project. For more information 
contact the Clarion United Way at (814) 226-8760 or 
unitedway@usachoice.net and include your full name 
and mailing address. 



Dance Team Tryouts 

Tryouts will be held to recruit new dancers for the bas- 
ketball season on Septemeber 28 at 6^00 p.m. in the 
Tippin Gymnasium dance studio. Clinics will be held on 
September 26 at 6 p.m. and September 27 at 9 p.m. For 
more information contact Jamie Bero (advisor), Ashley 
Carter (captain), or Stephanie Cooper (captain) at 256 
Gemmell Student Complex. 

The Dance Team took a second place trophy for Division 
II and the most improved of the camp award at the 
National Dance Alliance's collegiate day camp. The 
dancers also went to the NDA National Competition in 
Daytona Beach Florida. 



Advertise With Tiie Clarion Caii 

• Reach Clarion University's approximately 6,500 students, plus members of the entire Clarion county community. 
The Call is available free to anyone in the area. 

• Let us create an eye-catching ad for you. Our advertising design service is available at no extra cost to our advertis- 
ers. We will help you create an ad based on the information you provide us. 

• Local advertisers receive priority in placement on circulation routes. 

• Non-profit organizations may receive a 15% discount on our local or national advertising rates. 



2005-2006 Rates 



To measure the size of your advertisement, take the num- 
ber of columns wide X the number of inches high X the 
rate. If you need help determining the size of your ad, or 
to see other common ad sizes, please contact a Clarion 
Call advertising representative. 

Student organizations 

B&W $4.00 per column inch 

Full color $4.50 per column inch 

2X5 $40 B&W / $45 color 

1/4 page $120 B&W / $135 color 

Half page $240 B&W / $270 color 

Full page $504 B&W / $607 color 

Local businesses (Clarion area) 

B&W $5.00 per column inch 

Full color $5.50 per column inch 

2X5 $50 B&W / $55 color 

1/4 page $ 1 50 B&W / $ 1 65 color 

Half page $300 B&W / $330 color 

Full page $630 B&W / $693 color 

National businesses 

B&W $6.00 per column inch 

Full color $6.50 per column inch 

2X5 $60 B&W / $65 color 

1/4 page $180 B&W / $195 color 

Half page $360 B&W / $390 color 

Full page $756 B&W / $819 color 



Column Widths 



1 col. = 

2 col. = 
Scol. = 

4 col. = 

5 col. = 



1.798 in. 
3.763 in. 
5.728 in. 
7.694 in. 
9.660 in. 



6 col. = 11.625 in. 

Each column is 1 and 7/8 inches wide. Ads that go across 
more than one column are shghly larger, since they 
include the "gutter" or space between columns of text. If 
the camera-ready ad copy is in between sizes, the size 
must be rounded up to the next column width. 



Are you also a supporter of other Clarion 

University media organizations? 

Special discount! 

Discounts are available to those who support our sister 
organizations, WCUB television (campus channel 5, 
Adelphia channel 15), 91.7 WCUC radio, and The 
Eyrie" magazine. Recieve a 10 percent discount on 
advertising with The Call for each other media organi- 
zation you currently support There may also be special 
advertising packages available. Ask an ad representa- 
tive for details. 

WCUB-TV - The Eyrie - 91.7 WCUC 



Advertising deadlines are 
Mondays at 5 p.m. 

For more information on displaying advertising contact 
Advertising Sales Manager Chelsey Hummel or 
Advertising Design Editor Ashley Boynes at 
call@clarion.edu or 393-2380. 




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TM CLARION CMJL 



September 8. 2005 



Today Edition: Fooiyivsill Cli Tennis 



lioK Preview M Preview 



Dando Leads Golden Eagles in OT Thriller 



by Josh Woods 
Clarion Call 
Sports Editor 

Clarion Quarterback Brandon 
Dando bounced into the end 
zone on a three-yard run to 
lead the Golden Eagles to a 
29-23 victory in the fourth 
overtime of Saturday night's 
thrilling home-opening con- 
test at Memorial Stadium 
over the Kutztown Golden 
Bears. 

Dando, the Golden Eagles' 
lone signal caller after an 
injury to quarterback Eric 
Yonish, finished the night 
15-28 for 143 yards and one 
interception as he led the 
Golden Eagles to their 
first victory of the 2005 sea- 
son. 

"The game winning play was a 
great individual effort on 
[Dando's] part because we had 
called a pass and he had 
enough insight to realize it 
wasn't there and ran for it," 
said Head Coach Galen Luke. 
The Golden Eagles, batthng 
through multiple turnovers 
and tough field 
position overcame deficits of 
3-0, 10-7 and 16-7 with a 
hard-fought 

resiliency; showing that ulti- 
mately heart and determina- 
tion do pay off in the end. 
After falhng behind 16-7 on 
Kutztown quarterback Kyle 
Spotts' one-yard 
keeper with 0^55 seconds to 
play in the first half, the 
Golden Eagle special teams 
unit came up big with a 
blocked extra point. 
Herb Callaway, who was in 
the right place at the right 
time, scooped up the blocked 
PAT and returned it 98 
yards to pull Clarion within 
a touchdown. 

"The team kept fighting back 
. . . kept competing and would 




about it, Kutztown's points 
early in the game were the 
result of special team's plays 
and a fumble return, so the 
defense never really gave up 
points," said Coach Luke. 
The Golden Eagles would face 
equal adversity in the second 
overtime after a big hit by a 
Kutztown defender caused a 
fumble that appeared as if it 
may be returned for a touch- 
down that would have won the 
game for the Golden Bears. It 
was not, however; as Dando 
was able to come up with a 
game saving tackle. 
'That was the biggest play of 
the night," said Coach Luke. 
"He was the only guy that 
could have made that tackle." 



Photo courtoty of John Thompson. 

Brandon Dando readies the offense in the first half of SatunJay's 
29-23 four-overtime win over visiting Kutztown. 



not be denied. That's just a 
tremendous tribute to their 
attitude and their effort," 
Coach Luke said. 
Following a rather unevent- 
ful third quarter filled with 
punts and 

yawning students in the 
stands, everyone in atten- 
dance finally got their 
money's worth when Dando 
led the Golden Eagles on a 
63 yard drive following 
Kevin Rigby's interception of 
a Spotts pass. 
The drive began with a 15- 
yard unnecessary roughness 



penalty assessed against 
Kutztown, one that had 
Golden Bear Head Coach 
Dave Keeny raving mad on 
the sideline. 
Nine plays later Dando 
scored on a quarterback 
sneak from the one yard 
hne. Kyle Snoke's PAT would 
tie things up with 
5^14 to play in the game. 
Fueled by their game-tying 
touchdown the Clarion 
defense was able to hoM the 
Golden Bear offense off the 
scoreboard the rest of the 
way, forcing overtime. 



Neither team was able to 
score in the first overtime ses- 
sion, though Kutztown manu- 
factured a drive that gave 
them a first and goal from the 
four yard line 

caused a few tense moments 
before the Clarion defense 
made a stand forcing the 
Golden Bears to attempt a 
field goal. The field goal, much 
to the chagrin of the Golden 
Bears, sailed wide left sending 
the game to a second over- 
timesession. 

'The defense played very well. 
When you stop and think 



The team kept 
•ighting back 
md kept 
ompeting and 
vv^ould not be 
ienied." 

Coach Luke 



Tennis Wins 
a Pair in NJ 

by Josh Woods 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 



NEWARK, N.J.- The Clarion 
Women's tennis team trav- 
eled to the Garden State 
over the weekend to take on 
Eastern Regional opponent 
NJIT (New Jersey Institute 
of Technology) and Georgian 
Court, a two-day trip that 
proved victorious. 
After defeating host NJIT 
6-1 on Friday in its season 
opener, the team continued 
its early season success by 
defeating the Georgian squad 
on Saturday by a final 
count of 6-3. 
In Friday's action against 
NJIT, all of Clarion's dou- 
bles teams won; the number 
one doubles team's comprised 
of Co-captain Cori Rombach 
and Kristen Jack won 8-5, 
Emily Berry and Lisa 
Baumgartner won 8-2 and 
Amy and Megan Robertson 
won 8-4. 

"NJIT went to the NCAA 
Regionals over us last year ... 



so beating them gives us hope 
for this year," said Head 
Coach Lisa Sabatose. "It was 
also the first night match for 
most of the girls. Despite the 
adverse conditions created by 
the glare of the lights they did 
real well." 

In singles action Rombach 
highlighted the afternoon with 
a huge come back against top 
notch opponent Eva Salierno. 
After losing the first set 6- 
1, Rombach finished the 
match with 6-3 win in the sec- 
ond set and a 6-0 in the third 
on her way to victory. 
"Lisa continued where she left 
off last season and steam- 
rolled the competition 
throughout the weekend," said 
Sabatose. Also scoring a hard- 
fought victory was Emily 
Berry who defeated Deepti 
Sanjay after losing the sec- 
ond set in a tie breaker to 
force a third. 



Lisa contin- 
ued where she 
eft off ..." 
"Coach 
Sabatose 



"Emily Berry has shown a lot 
more confidence in her game 
and that three set victory was 
a huge confidence builder for 
her," Sabatose said. 
In addition to Baumgartner 
and Berry, twin sisters Amy 
and Megan Robertson had 
the competition seeing double, 
winning in straight sets for 
the Golden Eagles. 
Doubles proved to be the win- 
ning formula again on 
Saturday as the team took on 
Georgian Court of Lakeland, 
NJ, with the doubles teams 
sweeping Court to take an 
early 3-0 lead. 
Berry, Baumgartner and 
Amy Robertson won at num- 
ber three, four and five 
respectively paving the way 
for a second consecutive win. 
"Sweeping three doubles gave 
us a big advantage because 
then we only had to win two 
of the singles matches, ' said 
Coach Sabatose. "Two wins 
certainly made the trip home 
seem shorter and a lot more 
enjoyable." 

Clarion (2-0) will host its 
first home match of the sea- 
son this Saturday at 11 a.m. 
against Saint Vincent College 
at the Campbell Courts locat- 
ed behind the Recreation 
Center. 



Golden Eagle 
Golfers to Tee Off 



by Marc Steigerwald and Chris McKissick 
Clarion Call Staff Writers 



Al Lefevre, coach of the 
Clarion boy's golf team seems 
to be excited for the upcoming 
season. He has four returning 
lettermen: Justin Scott a jun- 
ior, all- region and all- 
Pennsylvania State Athletic 
Conference player; Zach 
Szwast, a junior; Tom Willy a 
junior is an all conference 
player, and Justine Moose a 
sophomore. 

The loss of Matt Guyton and 
Lou Jesiolkiewic will be felt 
this upcoming season. Both 
players were all PSAC and 
leaders. "After losing Matt 
and Lou a couple of us are 



going to have to step in and 
fill some very big shoes," says 
Justin Moose. 

A very talented freshmen class 
including Nick Brucker, from 
Pittsburgh, who won the 
Kings Family Restaurant Jr. 
tournament; Justine Cameron, 
from Punxsutawney, reigning 
District 9 champion; Charlie 
Fitzsimmons, from Canada, a 
very accomplished player in 
the U.S. where he played in 
many AJGA and IJGA Jr. 
tournaments; and Jeff Varga, 
from Pittsburgh, who qualified 
for the PIAA state tournament 



two years in a row and fin- 
ished tied for 27''" this past 
year. "I like our chances this 
year, because we are truly a 
team. We are all very close 
and hang out together a lot," 
said Justine Scott of the team. 
'The team has a lot of good 
balance. There will be a lot of 
competition for starting spots 
this season," added coach 
Lefevre. This Brookville native 
will be in his seventh season 
with the Golden Eagles. 
The Golden Eagles are looking 
to be very competitive this 
season in the PSAC and are 
looking for their fifth trip to 
the NCAA Regionals. 
lUP, Millersville, and 
California, who just got their 
golf program back after a 12 
year absence from the PSAC, 
are all looking very competi- 
tive this year. 
This week the team will be 
playing in the Ohio Valley 
Invitational in West Virginia 
at Woodbridge Country Club. 



Clarion (l-l) overall and (0-0) 
in the Pennsylvania State 
Athletic Conference, West 
Division, will take advantage 
of some perfect timing this 
weekend with a bye week on 
their schedule and rest up 
from Saturday night's three 
and a half hour contest. 
They will return to action next 
Saturday at Memorial 
-Staditimto battle the (Q-l) 




Photo Courtesy of Lorl Sabatose 

Cori Rombach serves up a victory against NJIT 
on Friday in New Jersey. 



CU at Athletic Events 



Cross Coimtxy 

Sept. 10 @ Thiel 

Football 

Sept. 17 vs. Mansfield 

Golf 

Sept. 9-10 Ohio Valley 
Invite @ Woolbridge CC. 



Soccer 

Sept. 10 @ West Chester 
Sept. 13 @ Lock Haven 

Tennis 

Sept. 10 vs. St. Vincent 

Volleyball 

Sept. 13 vs. Shppery Rock 



Caulfield 
Optimistic 
About 
Upcoming 
X-C Season 

by Josh Woods 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 



Coach Caulfield is optimistic 
about the Clarion University 
Men's and Women's Cross 
Country programs for the 
upcoming 2005 season. 
Some may call it a gut feeling, 
an instinct, or even a watchful 
eye at fall practice, but Coach 
Caulfield calls it none of the 
above. 

"Right now the kid's are learn- 
ing more about themselves 
and cross country as a whole, 
they know their strengths and 
weaknesses and have learned 
to focus on their strengths," 
said Caulfield, who is in his 
first season as head coach of 
both teams. 'They now know 
the infinite possibilities that 
they possess and that can only 
improve each of them this 
year and in the years to 
come." 

On the women's side Erin 
Richard, Tasha Wheatley and 
Katie Jarzab all return from 
last year's squad that 
advanced that faired well at 

the NCAA Division II Meet. 
Chris Clark, Shawn Williams 
and Matt Reinhold will make 
up the nucleus of the men's 



"They now 
know the infi- 
nite possibih- 
ties that they 
possess and 
that can only 
improve each 
of them this 
year and in the 
years to come." 

-Coach 
Caulfield 



University 
Scoreboard 



Football 

West Chester 41 CU 14 
.CU29 Kutztown 23 (40T) 



Soccer 

Mercyhurst? CUO 
CU3 Geneva 2 
Davis & Elkins 1 CU 
(20T) 
Edinboro 1 CU 



Tennis 

CU 6 NJIT 1 

CU6 Georgian Court 3 



VoUeyball 

CU3 LeMoyneO 
CU3 W/ Va. Wesleyan 
CU3 N.J.I.T 
CU3 Fairmont State 
CU 3 Daeman 1 
Hiram 3 CU 1 
CU3 Centre 
Heidelberg 3 CUO 
CU 3 Ohio Dominican 2 
CU 3 Georgian Court 
CU 3 Gannon 

Editor's Note: Cross Country 
and Golf have yet to begin 
their seasons. 



"Our goal for the women is to 
advance to the national meet 
this year and every year! how- 
ever, the task may be difficult 
due to the team's youth as far 
as the amount of training that 
is needed," said Coach 
Caulfield. 

team's atom and will be sur- 
rounded by several other 
returnees from last year's 
squad that finished 12 of 26 at 
the NCAA Regionals. 



uur goal lor tne mernsTor"^ 
have our highest finish in the 
last six or seven years and at 
the regional meet," said Coach 
Caulfield. 

According to Coach Caulfield, 
things have gone well to this 
point with just two days to go 
before the opening race at 
Thiel College for the Golden 
Eagle harriers, as everyone 
has been diligently working 
hard to step up their perform- 
ances to the next level. Also, 
there have only been minor 
ailments to report on the 
injury front. 

'They are still in heavy train- 
ing at this point and have 
been running more miles than 
most people have been driving 
... especially with the cost of 
gas," quipped Coach Caulfield. 
"With the continued support of 
the school's administration 
and athletic training staff I 
feel that we will be able to 
achieve all of our goals and be 
successful." 



UAB craft series 

see Features page 7 



Pete Schmidt & Matt Ryczek 

see Entertainment page 8 



One copy free 




Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 






Volume 91 Issue 2 September 15, 2005 




^ -^ r" 



Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

Bush Joins Forces With 
Annan 

UNITED NATIONS — In 
a rare show of unity after 
a bruising week for the 
United Nations, President 
Bush joined U.N. 
Secretary-General Kofi 
Annan on Wednesday in 
stating that no country 
can stand alone against 
the 21st-century chal- 
lenges of terrorism, dis- 
ease or natural disasters. 
Both leaders also chided 
the world body's member 
nations for blocking key 
reforms aimed at making 
the United Nations more 
able to tackle those chal- 
lenges — although many 
diplomats felt the United 
States was one of the 
countries responsible for 
some of the concessions. 

Northwest, Delta File for 
Chapter 11 Bankruptcy 

The nation's airline crisis 
deepened Wednesday 
when Delta Air Lines Inc. 
and Northwest Airlines 
Corp. both filed for bank- 
ruptcy in the face of mas- 
sive losses, bringing to 
four the number of big 
U.S. carriers now operat- 
ing under the supervision 
of a bankruptcy judge. 
Delta and Northwest, 
respectively the third- 
and fourth-largest air- 
lines by passenger traffic, 
said they would continue 
flying while they try to 
regain their financial foot- 
ing — a tall order given 
the surge in jet-fuel prices 
that followed Hurricane 
Katrina. 

9th Circuit Judge FoUows 
Precedent in Pledge Case 

A federal judge in 
Sacramento, Calif., ruled 
Wednesday that it is 
unconstitutional to 

require public school chil- 
dren to recite the words 
"under God" in the Pledge 
of Allegiance, reviving a 
contentious legal fight 
that inflamed the cultural 
wars over religion's place 
in government. 

Regional Baptist Group 
Initiates Break From 
National Denomination 
Leaders representing 300 
American Baptist church- 
es in southern California 
and parts of other western 
states Wednesday 

announced that they have 
taken the first steps to 
break with their national 
denomination because 
they said it had failed to 
declare homosexual prac- 
tice incompatible with 
Christian Scripture. 
Citing '"irreconcilable" 
differences over homosex- 
uality and Scriptural 
authority with their com- 
paratively liberal denomi- 
nation, American Baptist 
Churches USA, the board 
of directors of the denomi- 
nation's Pacific Southwest 
Region recently approved 
a resolution to begin with- 
drawing from the 1.5-mil- 
lion member national 
denomination. 



Grunenwald, Nolan speak to faculty: low 
enrollment but still high expectations 



John Santa 
News Editor 

sjmsanta@clarlon.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 13 - 
Clarion University 

President Dr. Joseph 
Grunenwald and Dr. Linda 
Nolan, Provost and Vice 
President for Academic 
Affairs, held their annual 
Fall Faculty Assembly 
Address Thursday, Sept. 8 
in Hart Chapel. 

The Fall Faculty Assembly 
Address consists of speeches 
given to the assembled fac- 
ulty members by both 
Grunenwald and Nolan 
respectively, who elaborate 
upon the fiduciary, adminis- 
trative and academic situa- 
tions pertaining to Clarion 
University for the current 
academic calendar and 




Enrollment Headcount 




aoM 



M01 



>003 



2003 



1004 



2001 



Photo: Jeannette Good/Tfie Clarion Call Graph: courtesy of President Grunenwald 

■all Faculty Address - President Grunenwald discusses enrollment and the University's strategic plan on Tt)ursday Sept. 8 . 



beyond. 

The first order of business 
for Dr. Grunenwald in the 
Fall 2005 address dealt with 
Clarion University's shrink- 
ing enrollment numbers. 



"Total enrollment has been 
more volatile," said 
Grunenwald, who also cited 
that there has been a 
decline in enrollment for the 
last 5 years. 



The numbers for FTIC 
(First Time In College) stu- 
dents and transfer students 
registered for the Fall 2005 
semester are down from pre- 
vious years with their num- 



bers being calculated for 
FTIC students at over 1,200 
students and transfer stu- 
dents at just under 400 stu- 
dents. 

See ASSEMBLY pagfi 2. 



Crossing national 
lines for science 
education 



Clarion professors 
to visit Portugal 

Jeffry Richards 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJprichards@clarion.edu 

Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania has two pro- 
fessors and a professor 
emeritus becoming involved 
in an international program 
referred to as the 
Portuguese Inquiry-Based 
Science Initiative. Working 
with the Portuguese 
Ministry of Education and 
the Carlucci American 
International School in 
Lisbon, the three have start- 
ed a program to promote 
inquiry-based science 

throughout Portugal. 

Dr. Vickie Harry, Dr. Bruce 
Smith, professor emeritus 
Dr. Ken Mechling and Amy 
Mechling, a science teacher 
at Immaculate Conception 
School in Clarion, were 
invited by a member of the 
Portuguese Ministry of 
Education to start this pro- 
gram. The idea was pitched 
to the group while they were 
at a conference for the 
Mediterranean Association 
of International Schools 
because the Portuguese 
Ministry of Education is 
interested in introducing 
inquiry-based science to 
schools in Portugal. 

Inquiry-based science is 
hands-on and is often 
referred to as "discovery sci- 
ence." The plan is to inform 
the teachers of Portugal 
about different aspects of 
inquiry-based science and to 
show them in a classroom 
environment just how it can 
work. The program is 
intended for students rang- 
ing from kindergarten to 6th 
grade. 

Harry, Smith and Mechling 
were all involved in creating 
lesson plans and proposing 
ideas to make the program 
work. Mechling and Harry 
will both be visiting 
Portugal throughout the 
year to inform not only 




Undergraduate research funds 



Dr. Vickie Harry 

teachers but also play active 
roles in classrooms. By the 
end of the year they should 
visit a total of 10 schools in 
Portugal and teach what 
both the Portugal Ministry 
of Education and the educa- 
tional standards of America 
have agreed on. 

"Finding topics that can go 
across international lines 
was actually pretty chal- 
lenging," said Harry, who is 
a professor of education at 
Clarion and is also a Clarion 
alumna. Nonetheless, she 
said, "I always like to do 
new things. Science educa- 
tion is what I love and what 
I am a professor of I have 
never worked outside of the 
international programs. It is 
a new challenge." 

Ken Mechling, who shares 
Harry's excitement, is well 
known for writing many 
grants. With his proposal 
the program was able to be 
funded by The Gulbenkian 
Foundation in Portugal and 
made this program possible. 
"Research tells us that 
children who do not have 
positive experiences when 
they are young lose interest 
[in science] later in life," 
Harry said, "I applaud the 
Gulbenkian Foundation for 
valuing science education in 
Portugal. This is a wonder- 
ful opportunity for stu- 
dents." 

Ken Mechling and Harry 
will be leaving September 
20 for planning meetings, 
and soon after they will 
start working in the schools. 
The program could end up 
being a three year program. 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_bekoebler@clarion.edu 

Clarion undergraduate 
students can now obtain an 
application from any depart- 
ment office to apply for a 
grant for up to five hundred 
dollars to fund a research or 
scholarly project. 

Any undergraduate stu- 
dent, in any major and a 
good academic standing, is 
eligible to apply. 

The funds, provided by the 
Clarion University Office of 
the Provost, are not limited 
to projects dealing with the 



traditional idea of laborato- 
ry studies in the scientific 
field. 

"The first thing to be 
aware of is that undergrad- 
uate research is being 
defined in a broad context to 
include any scholarly or cre- 
ative endeavor," said Dr. 
Steve Harris, undergradu- 
ate grants coordinator, and 
associate to the dean and 
the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Students must turn in two 
copies of their proposals by 
Oct. 7 to Harris or Dr. 
Brenda Dede, 

Undergraduates' 
Coordinator, in the Carrier 



Administration Building. 
Students may submit pro- 
posals individually or as a 
team of students, with one 
student designated as lead 
investigator. Projects will 
then be evaluated as soon as 
possible after the deadline. 

The application must 
include the undergraduate 
research/project grant form, 
as well as the undergradu- 
ate research/project budget 
form pages. The grant form 
page provides an outline 
that should be followed by 
for all proposals. All propos- 
als must also have the back- 
ing of a faculty collaborator. 
See RESEARCH page 2. 



SSHE welcomes hurricane victims 



Lindsay Grystar 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_llgrystar@clarion.edu 

Clarion University will 
soon open its doors to stu- 
dents from Pennsylvania 
who were enrolled this 
semester in a college or uni- 
versity that was closed due 
to the damage from 
Hurricane Katrina. 

Thirteen universities in 
the New Orleans area are 
now shut down because of 
the hurricane, and a total of 
75,000 students were affect- 
ed. Unfortunately, there is 
no way of determining the 
number of those students 
who are Pennsylvania resi- 
dents at this time. 

Kenn Marshall, media 
relations manager for the 
Pennsylvania State 



System of Higher 
Education, said "Even if it 
is just a handful, we 
believe it was 

important for us to 
attempt to help out; to 
help assure students don't 
lose an entire semester of 
their education." 

Most of the schools in hur- 
ricane-damaged areas will 
not be able to open this 
semester due to high wind 
and other damage sustained 
from the hurricane. 

Interested students will be 
offered enrollment in one of 
the fourteen state schools 
depending on spaces avail- 
able, and tuition and aca- 
demic fees will be waived for 
the fall semester. 

"Students can begin 
enrolling immediately, and 
some already have. With 
the semester already well 



under way, the sooner the 
better. I am certain 
the universities will work 
with these students to expe- 
diate the admission 
process and to assist 
them in whatever way 
possible to enable them to 
begin taking classes," 
added Marshall. 

President Joseph 

Gruenwald agrees, "As long 
as the number isn't too large 
and we have or can hire 
appropriate faculty." 

The state-owned universi- 
ties include Bloomsburg, 
California, Cheyney, 

Clarion, East Stroudsburgh, 
Edinboro, Indiana, 

Kutztown, Lock Haven, 
Mansfeild, Millersville, 
Shippensburgh, Slippery 
Rock, and West Chester 
Universities of 

Pennsylvania. 




Wally Skalll/Los Angeles Times 
CONGO PEACEKEEKRS - In Nyakakoma, a man rides by a mud t)ut, one of 150 burned by 
Mai-Mai rebels in July. It took UN troops, who were 35 miles away, a week to arrive with aid. 



mmm 



Page 2 



TOE CLARION CALL 



September 15. 2005 



hws 



"ASSEMBLT cofitfniMtf from 
front p«ge 

Dr. Grunenwald estimates 
that Clarion's total enroll- 
ment will consist of 6,375 
student's total, a decrease of 
46 students from the 2004 
academic year's total of 
6,421 students. 

"We have a normal num- 
ber of freshmen," said 
Grunenwald, who also noted 
that Clarion University is 
losing some sophomores and 
freshmen. 

Dr. Grunenwald also 
accredited the loss of stu- 
dents to the change in the 
degree requirements credit 
rule that changed the 
amount of credits needed to 
graduate from Clarion 
University from 128 to 120, 
allowing students to gradu- 
ate sooner. 

In the next portion of the 
nights proceedings Dr. 
Grunenwald spoke about 
the budget. 

"The good news is that 
there is some light at the 
end of the tunnel now," said 
Grunenwald, "the budget is 
a complicated issue and will 
continue to be... we are turn- 
ing the corner on the inces- 
sant budget problem." 

With a yet to be officially 
determined amount of 
money approved by the 
Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Educations, Board 
of Governors, to support 
departmental accreditations 
and libraries, university 
wide budget cuts and coop- 
eration from the Clarion 
University community, the 
budget is almost balanced. 

IiTffid^aSt section of his 
speech, Dr. Grunenwald 
outlined his "Guiding 
Principles" for Clarion 
University; these guiding 
principles are as follows, 
"enhance Clarion 

University's position as a 
leading high quality institu- 
tion serving the students of 
the Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher 

Education, identify and 
develop high quality aca- 
demic programs and stu- 
dent services focused on 
learning that are attractive 
to potential students and 
that serve important region- 
al needs, achieve moderate- 
ly growing enrollment, 
enhance diversity as a 
major contributor to overall 



high quality and contribute 
in a significant way to the 
advancements of the region 
and the community." 

In her first Fall Faculty 
Assembly Address at 
Clarion University Dr. 
Linda Nolan, provost and 
vice president of academic 
affairs, laid out her vision 
for Clarion's future academ- 
ically. 

Dr. Nolan began her con- 
tribution to the night's pro- 
ceedings by updating faculty 
on the status of Bachelor 
and Masters Degrees by col- 
lege. 

According to Dr. Nolan the 
College of Arts and Sciences 
awarded the most Bachelor 
Degrees by awarding 43% of 
all degrees, while the 
College of Education and 
Human services awarded 
36% of all degrees given by 
Clarion Universitv. The 



Master's Degrees from 
Clarion University. 

The next part of Dr. 
Nolan's presentation dealt 
with her provost's initia- 
tives, "This project will be 
naturally beneficial," said 
Nolan. 

According to Dr. Nolan 
these initiatives "explore 
the possibility of marketing 
a 5 year B.S. /B.A. and M.S. 
or M.A. degrees, explore the 
possibility of marketing an 
online general B.A. Degree, 
leverage international ties 
to enhance the curricula on 
global issues, provide spe- 
cial international, research, 
scholarship and civic oppor- 
tunities for students, high- 
light undergraduate activi- 
ties through undergraduate 
conference, create two 
Clarion Community 

Fellowships to promote civic 
engagement and strengthen 



FTIC and Transfers 



'smmmmwrnw!^ 




FsNSOOO FiN2001 FiN3002 fMITOOt P«ll2a04 Fjif2O0f 



Graph: courtesy of President Grunenwald 

FTIC and transfer student numbers down - Although FTIC 
numbers are down from last year, Dr. Grunenwald says nun)- 
bers are about normal. 



remaining degrees were 
awarded by the College of 
Business Administration 
which awarded 19% and the 
School of Nursing and Allied 
Health who awarded the 
remaining 2% of all degrees 
given. 

In the area of Masters 
Degrees awarded to stu- 
dents at Clarion University, 
the College of Education 
and Human Services award- 
ed the most Masters 
Degrees with 74%, while the 
remaining 26% was award- 
ed through the College of 
Business Administration 
who gave 15%, the School of 
Nursing and Alhed Health 
who awarded 7%, and the 
College of Arts and Sciences 
who awarded 4% of the 



community partnership 
with faculty, encourage 
interdisciplinary courses, 
programs and research." 

In the last portion of her 
presentation Dr. Nolan out- 
lined the Comprehensive 
Strategic Plan for Clarion 
University that will begin 
with the 2006 school year 
and will end in the 2011 
school year. 

A comprehensive strategic 
plan, according to Dr. 
Grunenwald in his "News 
and Views From the 
President" newsletter for 
September, "will establish 
broad university goals and 
provide more narrowly 
focused and specific objec- 
tives necessary to achieve 
those goals." 



"Clarion University has 
not engaged in a... strategic 
planning process since 
1987," said Nolan, "would 
you beheve that, 18 years 
ago." 

According to Dr. 
Grunenwald in the Sept. 8, 
edition of "The Clarion 
Call", "a comprehensive 
strategic plan 

process... involves an evalu- 
ation of our current pro- 
grams while looking at what 
is needed in the next five 
years." 

Dr. Nolan encouraged 
institutions members 

throughout the university to 
explore connections and 
partnerships with other 
units, institutions and 
external groups. 

"This year's strategic plan 
will have academic planning 
at its core," said Dr. 
Grunenwald. The academic 
plan as outlined earlier in 
the presentation by Dr. 
Grunenwald will consist of 
plans for enrollment man- 
agement, budget, facilities, 
student affairs, technology, 
capital campaign. Inter-col- 
legiate athletics and hous- 
ing and dining. 

"We want to develop the 
kind of plan that reflects the 
needs of students," said 
Grunenwald. 

Immediately following the 
addresses, new faculty were 
introduced to the assembly 
as part of the Faculty and 
Administrative Update. 
The new faculty members 
were introduced by their col- 
lege's dean and were recog- 
nized, by their colleagues, as 
members of Clarion 
University. In accordance 
with the verbal announce- 
ment a hard copy listing of 
the new faculty and admin- 
istrators was provided. 

"This resource presents 
information on an outstand- 
ing group of new faculty and 
administrators who have 
joined our university com- 
munity. It also shares news 
related to promotion, 
tenure, professional devel- 
opment and government 
structures," according to Dr. 
Grunenwald in the afore- 
mentioned written listing. 

The Fall Faculty Assembly 
Address for the 2005/2006 
academic year concluded 
with the annual reception 
sponsored by the President's 
Office and APSCUF, which 
took place at Moore Hall. 



New science center is a step in tiie rigiit direction 



Katie Fischer 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kcfischer@clarion.edu 

The science students at Clarion 
University are finally going to 
get a brand new, completely 
updated, science center. The 
modem science center, which 
will begin construction in sum- 
mer 2006, comes with a $30 mil- 
lion price tag and a promise of a 
new future for science students. 
"The creation of a new, state- 
of-the-art science and technolo- 
gy center will be a critical part of 
the strategic positioning of the 
university as a high quality insti- 
tution," said Clarion University 
President Joseph Grunenwald, 
"We are very excited about the 
potential that a new center holds 



for our delivery of first-rate 
teaching and for conducting 
important basic and applied 
research as well as the possible 
economic impact that the project 
will have." 

The current science center 
building has served Clarion's 
math and science students since 
the mid-1960s and is in need of 
repair. The first option of restor- 
ing and renovating Peirce was 
dismissed when costs for such 
repairs would exceed the cost of 
constructing a new building. 

Among the many repairs that 
would have been made, Peirce 's 
classrooms wefe at the top of the 
list. The classrooms, labs, 
preparation areas and offices of 
Peirce are clearly outdated, a 
fact recognized by most of 
Clarion University's science stu- 



dents. 

"The wiring alone in this build- 
ing isn't enough for the equip- 
ment we're using in the class- 
rooms," said Amy Flickenger, a 
senior molecular biology major. 



(( 



The creation of a new, 
state of-the-art sci- 
ence center wiil be a 
critical part of the 
strategic positioning 
of the university. 

- Dr. Grunenwald 



'You need updated facilities." 
The new building will be buih 



in Peirce's parking lot. Peirce 
will remain active while the new 
building is being constructed, 
and then demolished when con- 
struction is finished. The issue of 
where those with parking per- 
mits will park is yet to be decid- 
ed. 

While there might be the occa- 
sional inconveniences during the 
construction of the new building, 
Grunenwald assures students 
that class times won't be affect- 
ed, and that the construction is a 
big step in the right direction for 
Clarion University's future. 

"We need to make sure that the 
best possible teaching and 
research facilities supported by 
the finest technology are in place 
in our science building," 
Grunenwald said. 



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The Clarion Call" provides a synopsis of all criminal 
investigations as conducted by the Clarion University 
Public Safety for the month of September 2005. All 
information can be accessed on the Public Safety web- 
page. 

■ Sean Hagan, 20, of Greensburg, Pa., criminal charges 
were filed Sept. 12, for DUl, Littering and Underage 
Consumption after Hagan was stopped on Sept. 8 when 
University police saw a passenger throw a paper cup 
out the window of the vehicle Hagan was driving . 
Hagan did admit to consuming one beer. Hagan was 
taken to hospital for blood and results showed positive 
for alcohol in system. 

■ Eric Schrum, 18, of Schellsburg, Pa., was cited for 
carrying and consuming an alcoholic beverage and was 
found to have been underage. Schrum was with anoth- 
er unnamed person. 

■ Brandon Murphy, 19, of Bakerstown, Pa., was 
observed carrying alcohol on university property and 
when stopped was found to be underage and was cited 
for possession. 



■ Aaron Cangey, 18, of New Castle, Pa., was found to be 
intoxicated but did not need medical attention. At 11:23 
p.m. university police were dispatched to Wilkinson 
Hall for a report of a male passed out in a hallway. 
Cangey did admit to consuming alcohol and did fail 
PET. Citations were issued for Pubhc Drunkenness and 
Underage Consumption. 

■ Scott Eric Hartzel,19, of Saxonburg, Pa., was cited by 
university police for Underage Consumption. Hartzel 
was with an unnamed male that was stopped for Public 
Drunkenness. Hartzel did admit to consuming alcohol 
and did fail PBT. 

■ Russell E Colwell III, 19, of Sarver, Pa., was spotted 
at 2:35 a.m. on Sept. 9 by university police staggering 
in Lot E by Page Street. Cowell did admit to consum- 
ing alcohol and did have a strong odor on his breath. 
Colwell ni also had slurred speech and failed PBT. 
Citations were issued for Underage Consumption and 
Public Drunkenness. 

■ Michael Bowman, 20, of Kersey, Pa., was the subject 
of a Campus Police investigation into an incident of cor- 
ruption of minors in Ballentine Hall reported on May 
10. As result of that investigation. Bowman of that res- 
idence hall was arrested for 2 counts of Corruption of 
Minors and 1 count of Criminal Conspiracy. 

■ Brittany Ishman, 19, of Corsica, Pa., was cited on 
Sept. 8 at 1:29 a.m. as University police saw a female 
throw out a paper cup fi-om a vehicle traveling on Wood 
Street and 9th Avenue. Ishman who was the passenger 
of the vehicle, did have a odor of alcoholic beverage on 
her breath and did show positive on the PBT. Citations 
were issued for Underage consumption and littering. 

■ Casey Trischler, 18, of Pittsburgh, Pa., was found in 
possession of alcohol and did admit to consuming one 
beer after University police were dispatched to 
Wilkinson hall on Sept. 7 for a noise and alcohol com- 
plaint. Citation was issued for Underage consumption 
and possession. Trischler also failed PBT. 



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"The Clarion Call" 



September 15. 2005 



TOE CLARION CALL 



Page 3 



Senate discusses new Peirce 




Lindsay Grystar 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_llgrystar@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 12 - The 
science students at Clarion 
University are finally going 
to get a brand new, com- 
pletely updated, science cen- 
ter. The modern science 
center, will begin construc- 
tion in summer 2006, comes 
with a $30 million price tag 
and a promise of a bright 
future for science students. 
'The creation of a new, 
state-of-the-art science and 
technology center will be a 
critical part of the strategic 
positioning of the university 
as a high quality institu- 
tion," said Clarion 
University President Joseph 
Grunenwald, "We are very 




Rflorrls Pratt/rhe Clarion Call 

Meeting - Student senators discuss new science center. 



excited about the potential 
that a new center holds for 
our delivery of first-rate 
teaching and for conducting 
important basic and applied 
research as well as the pos- 
sible economic impact that 
the project will have." 

The current science center 
building has served 
Clarion's math and science 
students since the mid- 
1960's and is in serious need 
of repair. The first option of 
restoring and renovating 



Peirce was dismissed when 
costs for such repairs would 
exceed the cost of construct- 
ing a new building. 

Among the many repairs 
that would have been made, 
Peirce's classrooms were at 
the top of the list. The class- 
rooms, labs, preparation 
areas and offices of Peirce 
are clearly outdated, a fact 
recognized by most of 
Clarion University's science 
students. 

"The wiring alone in this 



building isn't enough for the 
equipment we're using in 
the classrooms," said Amy 
Flickenger, a senior and 
molecular biology major, 
"You need updated facili- 
ties." 

The new building will be 
built in Peirce's parking lot. 
Peirce will remain active 
while the new building is 
being constructed, and then 
demolished when construc- 
tion is finished. The issue of 
where those with parking 
permits will park is yet to be 
decided. 

While there might be the 
occasional inconveniences 
during the construction of 
the new building, 

Grunenwald assures stu- 
dents that class times won't 
be affected, and that the 
construction is a big step in 
the right direction for 
Clarion University's future. 

"We need to make sure 
that the best possible teach- 
ing and research facilities 
supported by the finest tech- 
nology are in place in our 
science building," 

Grunenwald said. 



The following Is Me continuation of t/ie atory "Proaldent to announce plan today," which should have appeared In our iMt 
Inue. The complete atory la available on our Web alte (www.clarloncall.clarlon.edu). The Clarion Call regreta the error. 



"Competition is fierce. In 
western Pennsylvania, 
freshman enrollment is 
declining. We need to be 
able to grow our off-campus 
avenues, such as the 
Venango campus and web 
courses and possibly add 
weekend courses and alter- 
native markets for those 
who work during the week. 
We need to find the markets 
viable within a two hour 
radius. The question is, how 



are you going to make the 
best with what you got?" 
said Grunenwald. 

According to Grunenwald, 
the state schools work 
together, however, recruit- 
ment is a bit of every- man- 
for-himself. "We collaborate 
when we can. However, 
recruitment falls on the 
individual universities. 
Clarion regularly has cross- 
applications with Penn 
State, lUP, Edinboro, and 




President Joseph Grunenwald 



SHppery Rock." 

"Probably, yes," said 
Grunenwald. in answer as 



to whether or not competi- 
tion will grow in coming 
years. 



"RESEARCH" continued from 
frontpage 



Proposals will be reviewed 
and evaluated on the basis 
of merit, the quality of the 
design and achievability of 
successfully completing the 
research. After review, the 
committee can choose to 
fully fund the project, par- 
tially fund the project, or to 
not fund the project. With a 
set amount of funds, the 
committee will fund as 
many projects as possible. 

"We can fund more proj- 
ects at $100 than we can for 
$500, so students will need 
to be realistic with their 
budgets. Faculty mentors 
can help with this process as 
most are familiar with 
grants and budgeting," said 
Harris. 

Projects are to be conduct- 
ed with a faculty mentor. 
Faculty members are per- 
mitted to sponsor one to 
three projects in a funding 
cycle. The chosen faculty 
member must provide a let- 
ter of support for the proj- 
ect, sign the grant cover 
page and help with prepar- 
ing the grant proposal and 
budget. 

An undergraduate 
research symposium will be 
held at Clarion University, 
where students will present 
their research, on April 26, 
2006. For any projects that 
may be ongoing, they will be 
presented at the following 
year's symposium. Students 
will also present the results 
of their studies at a confer- 
ence in the spring. 

"Clarion University is pro- 
viding a wonderful opportu- 
nity for students. The stu- 
dents need to respond to the 



opportunity. In short, the 
more hands-on experience a 
student has, the more in 
demand they become," said 
Harris. 

The committee will consist 
of members from many dif- 
ferent departments includ- 
ing the College of Business, 
the College of Education, 
Arts and Sciences and oth- 
ers. 

"Each of the reviewers will 
have slightly different per- 
spectives on what consti- 
tutes a good project, depend- 
ing on their discipline. The 
committee as a whole will 
have general guidelines for 
rating the proposals and we 
will all meet as a group to 
discuss the proposals before 
awarding the grants. The 
committee will also look at 
students' grades and num- 
ber of credits completed. 
These factors could become 
more and more important if 
there is a great deal of com- 
petition for the funds," said 
Harris. 

Committee members 
include; Dr. Rod Rashsler, 
economics! Dr. Thomas 
Oliver, accountancy! Dr. 
Hallie Savage, director of 
the honors program! Dr. 
Brian Maguire, education! 
Dr, Julia Aaron, philosophy, 
sociology, political science! 
Gary Greenberg, art! Dr. 
Robert BuUington, theatre! 
Dr, Greg Clary, special edu- 
cation! Dr. Valerie Bennet, 
biology! Dr. Susan Hilton, 
communication! Dr. Jeanne 
Slattery, psychology! Dr. 
David Lott, biology! Dr. 
Ellen Foster, English! Dr. 
Laurie Occipinti, anthropol- 
ogy, geography, earth sci- 
ence! Dr. Rebecca Leas, 
health and physical educa- 
tion! and Dr. Bruce Smith, 
education. 



Some GOP legislators hit Jarring notes on Katrine 



Charles Babington 

Los Angeles Times-Washington Post 
News Service 

WASHINGTON. Sept. 9 — 
Some lawmakers are still 
struggling to find the sym- 
pathetic but diligent tone 
that a disaster such as 
Hurricane Katrina — and 
the lagging government 

response to its victims 

w^ould seem to call for. 

The latest elected official 
to step into the swamp was 
Rep. Richard Baker, a 10- 
term Republican from Baton 
Rouge. "The Wall Street 
Journal" reported Friday 
that he was overheard 
telling lobbyists: "We finally 
cleaned up public housing in 
New Orleans. We couldn't 
do it, but God did." 

Democrats, of course, glee- 
fully disseminated the 
report, saying they detected 
a GOP pattern. House 
Speaker Dennis Hastert. R- 
111., recently spoke of bull- 



doziiig part of New Orleans, 
they reminded everyone, 
and Sen. Rick Santorum, R- 
Pa,, suggested punishing 
people who had ignored pre- 
storm evacuation orders. 
Baker issued a lengthy 
statement saying he was 
"taken aback" by the 
Journal's brief item. 

"What I remember 
expressing, in a private con- 
versation with a liousing 
advocate and raeniber of my 
staff, was that 'We have 
been trying for decades to 
clean up New Orleans pub- 
lic housing to provide decent 
housing for residents, and 
now it looks like God is 
finally making us do it,' " 
Baker wrote. "Obviously I 
have never expressed any- 
thing but the deepest con- 
cern about the suffering 
that this terrible catastro- 
phe has caused for so many 
in our stale," 

Meanwhile, in 
Pennsylvania, Santorum 



was drawing a second round 
of fire, this time for saying 
the National Weather 
Service's forecasts and 
warnings about Kalrina's 



which Santorum said that 
"we need a robust National 
Weather Service" that focus- 
es on severe weather predic- 
tions. "Obviously the con- 




Glna Ferazzl/r/ie Los Angeles Times 

The Face of Katrina Holdouts- Trevor Jones intended to 
evacuate but came home to find his ride out of Gretna, La., 
gone. 



path were "not sufficient." 
Democrat's e-mailed audio 
links to a radio interview in 



sequences are incredibly 
severe, as we've seen here in 
the last couple of w-eeks. if 



we don't get it right and 
don't properly prepare," 
Stntorum said. 

In feet, many people think 
the Weather Service got the 
Katrina prediction exactly 
right. They include Sen. Jim 
DeMint, R-S.C, who chairs 
the Senate Commerce sub- 
committee on disaster pre- 
diction and prevention. He 
issued a statement head- 
lined "DeMint Gives 
National Weather Service 
"A' Grade for Katrina 
Prediction.'' Santorum, long 
at odds with the federal 
agency, is pushing a bill that 
would require it to surren- 
der some of its duties to pri- 
vate businesses, some of 
them located in his state. 
The National Weather 
Service Employees 

Organization said in a state- 
nient: "We did our job well 
and everyone knows it. By 
falsely claiming that we got 
it wrong, Rick Santorum is 
continuing his misguided 



crusade against the 
National Weather Service." 
Santorum's office issued a 
statement Friday repeating 
the concern that "there are 
serious consequences" when 
the Weather Service falls 
short of "getting it right." 

These days it seems that 
no Republican remark is too 
small or ambiguous to trig- 
ger a Democratic mass mail- 
ing. The Democratic 
Congressional Campaign , 
Committee sent links 
Friday to a Houston 
Chronicle blogger who had 
watched House Majority 
Leader Tom DeLay, R-Texas, 
tour the Astrodome, where 
children evacuated from 
New Orleans were playing. 
The blog reported that 
DeLay "likened their stay to 
being at camp and asked, 
'Now, tell me the truth, 
boys, is this kind of fun?' 
"The blogger said the young- 
sters "nodded yes, but 
looked perplexed." 



Head of bioethics panel to step down 



Rick Weiss 

Los Angeles Times-Washington Post 
News Service 



WASHINGTON, Sept. 8 — 
Leon Kass, the University of 
Chicago medical ethicist 
who four years ago was 
named by President Bush to 
head the newly created 
President's Council on 
Bioethics, will step down as 
chairman Oct. 1, the White 
House announced late 
Wednesday. 

Kass, who led the 18-mem- 
ber group of philosophers, 
scientists, theologians and 
legal scholars as it plumbed 
the turbulent debates over 
human cloning, embryonic 
stem cell research, the cre- 
ation of animal-human 
hybrids and other topics 
raised by rapid advances in 



biotechnology, asked to be 
reUeved of the chairman- 
ship, council spokeswoman 
Diane Gianelli said. 

"He loved the job" and will 
continue to serve as a mem- 
ber of the council, Gianelli 
said, but he had been feeling 
increasingly burdened by 
the amount of work involved 
in being chairman. 

The White House said it 
had selected as the new 
chairman Edmund 

Pellegrino, 85, a professor 
emeritus of medicine and 
medical ethics at 

Georgetown University 
Medical Center and a for- 
mer president of Catholic 
University. He will join the 
council in October. 

Neither Kass nor 
Pellegrino, a widely 
renowned Catholic medical 



ethicist, responded to 
inquiries Thursday. 

Kass spent Thursday over- 
seeing completion of the 
council's seventh major 
report, on the ethics of care- 
giving for the aged. In a 
brief written statement 
released, he said he was 
"deeply grateful to 
President Bush for the priv- 
ilege of chairing his 
bioethics council during 
these challenging times." 

Kass often said he hoped 
to inspire ordinary people to 
think more deeply about the 
crossroads of technologj' and 
ethics. In one such effort. 
the council published an 
anthology of excerpts from 
popular literature, includ- 
ing stories by Tolstoy. 
Shakespeare and Homer, 
that raised difficult 



bioethics questions. 

Although widely respected 
for his intellect, Kass's his- 
tory of opposition to some 
reproductive technologies 
and his general wariness of 
other biomedical trends 
such as efforts to forestall 
aging made him a thorn in 
the side of many researchers 
and liberal thinkers. In 
February 2004 he came 
under intense fire for his 
role in the dismissal of two 
council members with liber- 
al views on embryonic stem 
cell research. 

Kass repeatedly denied 
that the ejections were poht- 
ically motivated, but the 
image was difficult to shake, 
especially given his occa- 
sional open involvement in 
the political fray. 

"I think Leon went too far 



to engage himself in the pol- 
itics of the topics the council 
considered, writing newspa- 
per op-eds and going on the 
think-tank circuit," said 
Arthur Caplan, chairman of 
the department of medical 
ethics at the University of 
Pennsylvania Medical 

School. In several cases, 
Caplan said, Kass seemed to 
be pushing for a consensus 
that would be in line with 
the White House's preor- 
dained views on a topic. 

"I think that may have 
damaged some of what he 
tried to accomplish," Caplan 
said. 

Others praised Kass for 
his leadership, as demon- 
strated in part by the large 
number of papers the group 
published on tough issues. 
"It's been a very productive 



council, and I think that's 
largely attributable to 
Leon," said Carter Snead, 
an associate professor of law 
at the University of Notre 
Dame who served for three 
years as the council's gener- 
al counsel. 

As for politics, Snead said, 
"It was totally inconsistent 
with (Kass's) vision to be a 
post-hoc think tank to help 
the White House justify its 
policies." 

Pellegrino, who is also 
affiliated with Georgetown's 
Kennedy Institute of Ethics, 
will introduce himself to the 
council at its meeting 
Friday and will take the 
reins at the next meeting, as 
yet unscheduled. The group 
will decide what topic to 
address next, Gianelli said. 



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Page 4 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



September 15. 2005 



OfiiiiM 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex, Clarion, PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

Web: clarioncall.clarlon.edu E-mail: call@clarion.edu 



Executive Board 



Tom McMeekin, 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dan Edington, 
Managing Editor 

John Santa, 
News Editor 

Ashley E. Angle, 
Features Editor 

Josh Woods, 
Sports Editor 

Jeannette Good, 
Copy & Design Editor 



Melissa Hollier, 
Photography Editor 

Jamie Flanagan, 
Business Manager 

Chelsey Hummel, 
Ad Sales Manager 

Ashley Boynes, 
Advertising Designer 

Tina Sickler, 
On-line Editor 

Paul Anderson, 
Circulation Manager 



Staff 

Lorie Abraham, Ryan Aloia, Ambri Alexander, Jennifer 
Angelos, Michael Balchin. Kerri Ballina, David Banks, 
Adam Bauer, Eddie Baumcratz, Jason Bice, Elisa 
Borger, Eric Bowser, Kurt Boyd, Brandi Brady, Katie 
Bullers, Daniel Burr, Kimberly Cammuso, Ashley 
Carter, Tyler Crissman, Jonathan Gofer, Kevin 
Colonna, Ryan Cornman, Lisa Covington. Brandon 
Devennie, Hilary Dieter. Jonathan Donelli, Jeffrey 
Donston, Sean Dreher, Jonathan Egbert, Lori 
Elmquist, Katie Fischer. Audrey Fiske, Danielle Gais, 
Shawn Glancy, Lindsay Grystar, Grant Herrnberger, 
Chris Hofer. Robyn Holz. Sara Hoover, Shandrial 
Hudson, Andy Johnson, Jennifer Kalgren, Emma 
Kelly Beth Kibler. Brittnee Koebler, Jason Kooser, 
Siesta Kurtz, Joe Kuszaj, Lauren Macek. Michael 
Marcello, Chris McKissick. Nicole Meyer, Heather 
Moore, Megan MuUins, Cheyenne Patterson, Mollie 
Pifer, Morris Pratt, Elizabeth Fresutti, Gayathri 
Rajendran, Zach Ramsey Stephanie Rawson, Ryan 
Rhoades, Jeffry Richards. Sarah Roesch, Roberta 
Rosati, Lisa Sagan, Lindsey Schnieder, Jared Sheatz, 
Vicki Sheeler, Jennifer Shetter, Melody Simpson, 
Nathan Stahlman, Kristen Staley Darrell Stanyard, 
Marc Steigerwald, Tom Steinhagen, Lindsay Sturgeon, 
Kirwin Sutherland, Matt Topolski, Steve Trichtinger, 
Ariel Weaver, Kevin Wetter, Pam Wherry, Amber 
White, Jimi Wikander, Ryan Wolfe, Devon Yorkshire, 
Jessica Zelinsky 

Policies 

The Clarion Call is the student-run newspaper of 
Clarion University of Pennsylvania and the surround- 
ing communities. The Call is published most 
Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but 
reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, 
punctuation, and obscenity; the determination of 
which is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief. 

Opinions expressed in this paper are those of the 
writer or speaker, and do not necessarily reflect the 
opinions of the newspaper staff, student body, Clarion 
University or the community. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact 
information. They must be received no later than 5 
p.m. Mondays. If the author of a letter wishes to 
remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter 
of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published 
only based on available space and at the discretion of 
the Executive Board. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricu- 
lar as a member of The Call staff. They should sched- 
ule their co'curricular when scheduling classes. Only 
students who fulfill their responsibilities for the entire 
semester will be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue 
and the Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout 
Clarion. One copy is free; additional copies are $L00. 



Walking away those extra miles 



Editorial 




Tom McMeekin 
Editor-in-Chief 

s_tjmcmeekin@clarion.edu 

With gas prices rising, 
many think consumers are 
downsizing their vehicles to 
those with better gas 
mileage. My father seems to 
think so, and a story from 
the Washington Post news 
service confirms that people 
are at least choosing smaller 
SUVs if not shying away 
from them altogether. 

I disagree; I think most of 
society is unwilling to make 
the difficult changes neces- 
sary for becoming less 
dependent on gasoline. 
However, if we were to do 
so — even just a little — we 
would reap many benefits. 

Perhaps most important is 
the fact that we could 
become healthier individu- 
als by driving less. I don't 



have a car; therefore I walk, 
use the Clarion Area Transit 
buses or get a ride from a 
friend whenever 1 need to 
get somewhere. Because I 
don't like being a pain to 
others and my schedule 
doesn't always coincide with 
the buses, a lot of the time I 
end up walking. Basically 
through walking and minor 
changes in diet (such as 
choosing sugar free or diet 
drinks), I've lost a great deal 
of weight over the past year. 

Walking has been receiv- 
ing more attention in the 
media lately as the newest 
exercise fad, with pedome- 
ters being given away at 
fast food restaurants as part 
of the craze. It might not be 
a miracle cure, but it cer- 
tainly helps. 

College students and other 
viewers often sit around 
watching "Celebrity Fit 
Club" and similar shows 
which emphasize the impor- 
tance of being healthy. To 
Hollywood, this also means 
thin — and other typical 
ideas of beauty that have 
been around since the clas- 
sical period. It's ironic that 
people watch washed-up 
celebs getting yelled at for 
not meeting their target 



weights and hours later, 
still sitting around on the 
couch, order pizza and get 
drunk. 

Also, if fewer people drove 
to campus, they wouldn't 
have to deal with the has- 
sles of parking — paying for 
a pass, looking for a space or 
moving their car so they 
don't receive a fine if they 
are going to be on campus 
late. 

There are the obvious ben- 
efits to the environment as 
well. 

However, to allow there to 
be a viable alternative to 
driving a vehicle every- 
where, there are some other 
changes that need to occur. 
First, public transporta- 
tion needs to be better and 
more accessible. Clarion's is 
better than most rural or 
suburban communities', but 
it does not run nearly long 
enough into the night. Over 
the past year, the schedule 
has been cut down consider- 
ably forcing those on cam- 
pus at night to find another 
way home — and truthfully, 
it wasn't late enough even 
before the schedule changes. 

Second, the sidewalks and 
roadways in the area must 
be safer. Last year, there 



was talk of a possible side- 
walk extending to Reinhard 
Villages— where currently 
pedestrians must walk on 
the edge of the road, practi- 
cally walking on hillsides or 
falling off the bridge into a 
stream, in particularly 
unsafe conditions to be 
walking. However, there is 
still no sidewalk. Will the 
community wait until there 
is a horrific accident to do 
something about the situa- 
tion? 

Also, with the recent safe- 
ty alerts issued, walking at 
night doesn't seem to be a 
safe option. Some, including 
public safety and area hang- 
outs, have increased the 
escort services available. 
Services like this are good, 
but long overdue. 

Additionally, although 
some people may not want 
to recognize the fact that 
college students, even those 
underage, are likely to drink 
alcohol, it does happen. 
Having a good public trans- 
portation system would also 
help cut down on the dan- 
gerous activity of drunk 
driving. 

The author is a junior com • 
munication major and 2D 
art/printmaking minor. 



My personal War on Terror 



Paul Anderson 
Circulation Manager 

s_pmanderson@clarion.eclu 



A "special" side note from 
the Garbage Can: Last 
week, I referenced the 
Buddhist monk who was 
into self-barbeque as a 
Hindu. Many apologies; I 
had too much root beer the 
night I wrote that column 
and I was ALL out of head. 
As for caUing him a terror- 
ist ... well, I stand by that. 
Read on. - Paul 




When I was a kid, I 
believed in Santa Glaus. 
Not an uncommon thing; 
everyone did when they 
were kids. I realized that 
Santa (and the Tooth Fairy 
and the Easter Bunny and 
Reaganomics) was bogus 
when I was about eight. 
Everyone did. 

Do you remember, (think 
back, now), what it was like 
to believe? Here we have a 
jolly fat man riding a sleigh 
driven by reindeer (he was 
one of PETA's worst night- 
mares), bringing gifts once a 
year to every boy and girl in 
the world ... but only the 
good boys and girls. The bad 
boys and girls got coal or 
nothing. Remember what it 
was like to live in a near- 
total childlike terror of what 
he might see and describe 
as "bad"? "He sees you when 
you are sleeping, he knows 
when you're awake, he 
knows if you've been bad or 
good so be good for goodness 
sake." So, for people under 
four feet tall, we had a fat, 



voyeuristic pedophile brib- 
ing us with gifts ... some- 
times. Didn't our parents 
warn us about taking gifts 
from strangers? 

After Sept. 11, George 
Bush climbed on top of the 
rumble at Ground Zero with 
a bullhorn in one hand and 
declared war on the people 
that hurt us - a War on 
Terror. We would stop those 
who seek to harm others for 
political or religious reasons 
(and never mind that Bush's 
2000 campaign claimed dur- 
ing the primary that rival 
John McCain had sired an 
illegitimate black child). We 
invaded Afghanistan, and I 
followed along. Surely 
someone couldn't politicize 
such a tragedy as Sept. 11 ... 
or could they? (the author 
says, shifting his eyes left to 
right in a suspicious man- 
ner.) 

I'm eight years old again. 
And I no longer believe. 

The War on Terror, like the 
Reagan War on Drugs or 
Nixon's War on Cancer, 
sounds encouraging, but 
really doesn't do anything. 
Take the War on Drugs; we 
had Nancy Reagan admon- 
ishing us to just say no. 
Millions of dollars spent 
...but how easy is it, almost 



The 
Dumping 

i^round 



20 years later, to get drugs? 
Let's be honest here. No 
one's going to judge us 
...except Santa and the 
Gipper. 

I realized that the War on 
Terror was only so much 
babble as we sank further 
into the quagmire that was 
Iraq. As of this writing. King 
Fahd of Saudi Arabia has 
died. Saudi Arabia, for those 
playing the home game, 
sponsors terrorism. So does 
Pakistan, Libya, Iran, 
Jordan, and Sudan. 
However, we invaded Iraq, a 
place that most fundamen- 
talists disliked because 
Saddam ran a totalitarian 
government, (which has 
never been kind to anything 
that takes away from the 
government, including God). 
In fact, Saudi Arabia is our 
friend. A good friend. 

We never bother with the 
countries that have some- 
thing to offer us. Saddam 
only became an enemy after 
he invaded Kuwait. We gave 
him his WMDs in the 1980s. 
We'll support any dictator or 
monster that backs us up or 
gives us something. In the 
1950s, it was those who 
were against communism. 
Now it's for gifts, hke oil. 
Doubt me? We overthrew 



Iran's elected government in 
the 1950s because they were 
too "left" for Ike. We 
installed the Shah, who was 
overthrown in the 1970s for 
the AyatoUahs, fundamen- 
talists who bombed planes 
and took our people hostage. 
For giggles, look up 
Pinochet or Chavez or 
Noriega on Google. Oh, 
Ollie North, you took the fall 
for the Reagan 

Administration, you putz. 

Beyond that, to get into 
semantics, who are terror- 
ists? Only Muslim funda- 
mentalists with shoulder- 
rocket launchers? What 
about the politicians, con- 
servatives and liberals, who 
try to scare you into towing 
the party-line? What about 
people like Sean Hannity or 
Michael Moore or Rush 
Limbaugh, who only want to 
talk trash about those God- 
less liberals and fascist con- 
servatives? What about the 
pharm.aceutical companies 
who spend millions trying to 
convince the population that 
they are mentally ill and 
terminal? Terrorism, when 
you get right down to it, is 
as much words as action. 
Whatever it takes to influ- 
ence policy and people. 
Terrorism is nothing more 
than the systematic use of 
fear to influence political/ 
religious policy. Fear is a 
great stimulant for con- 
sumption and silence. 

As for me, I no longer 
believe in the War on Terror. 
Instead, I have decided to 
start my own War on 
Terrorism. My first target is 
Santa Glaus; that spying, 
threatening bastard. 



Got an opinion? We want to hear it! 

Send us your submissions for The Free Press, comments on this or other issues of The Call, your 
rants about things you encounter in Clarion or the world or letters to the editor. 

E-mail call@clarion.edu for more information. Submissions should include contact information. 



September 15. 2005 



Tm CUkRION CALL 



Pages 




Ashley Boynes 
Advertising Design 



Beautiful 
Babble 



Useless Chatter 



Before I begin on the topic of the week, I would like 
to give a brief introduction on myself and what I hope 
this column to potentially be. My name is Ashley 
Boynes, and I am 21-going-on-22 years old. 1 am the 
ad designer on the executive board of "The Clarion 

Call," and my true pas- 
sion is writing. 

I am an English major 
and have two manuscripts 
that I would someday like 
to get published. 1 also 
write a ton of poetry. 

I am admittedly quite 
the girly-girl and all that 
comes along with that, 
but I definitely have a 
__ good head on my shoul- 
ders and can hold my own 
during an intelligent con- 
versation (or so I have 
"" been told). I do not con- 
sider myself to be, nor do 
I try to be, "like every 
other girl" and hope that 
this shines through in my 
writing. 
I aim for this column to be humorous, useful, intel- 
lectual, enlightening, provoking, non-offensive and 
unique.. .but most of all, fun, a la "Sex & the City" My 
intent is to explore relationships, friendships, society 
trends, and more... with room for me to rant and rave, 
of course. 

So with that being said, I'd like to delve into the uni- 
versal terror that is womanhood" gossip. 

It is a known fact that women love to gossip. Gossip 
about family, friends, peers, acquaintances, strangers, 
celebrities, nuns, fisherman, the lady at the nail salon, 
the guy that picks up your garbage.. .you name it. 

However, the most intriguing topic of all? Each 
other! No clique is complete without the usual "she 
said this, she did that, look who she's dating now" jar- 
gon that practically defines female friendship. 

My question is this: how is it friendship, when you 
talk about each other behind one another's backs? To 
me, this is not right, it is not normal in terms of what 
a true friend is, or rather, should be... but the sad 
thing is, its acceptable, and almost expected. "We're 
girls, we talk, we gossip" is such a common excuse, but 
in times like these, I'd like to know this: What exactly 
in MY life, could possibly be more intriguing than dis- 
cussing... oh, I don't know.,,your own life, your own 
relationships, your own job, your own weight, your 
own choices, your own beliefs... or even a TV show, a 
book, a movie, a CD, politics, a class, art, fashion, 
sports? 

The thing is, every woman does it. Some, like mj^self, 
do it on occasion, but choose to refrain from "behind- 
the-back" talks as much as humanly (or womanly) pos- 
sible. I do this because, although gossiping is socially 
accepted and very common, it still can hurt. 

Some girls, however, will never stop, and...ya gotta 
love 'em, because society conditioned us to be this way! 
With being a woman in America, there is this unspo- 
ken rite of passage mto the World of Girlfriends that, 
in order to create a bond, you must talk and talk and 
share secrets (sometimes not even your own) and then 
talk some more. I'm not knocking anyone, because we 
all know this is how female friendships operate. I love 
my friends dearly, and always will, but there is a rea- 
son women are stereotyped, and ladies — this is it! 

So let's try, together, to make a new version of the 
Golden Rule applicable to friends. I will not talk about 
you behind your back, if you do not talk about me. 

We'll work on the not-gossiping-aboutanyone deal, 
but since that is truly an unattainable goal, lets try to, 
within our own Mmits, respect one another and our 
privacy, trust, and choices. Do this, and "Girl World" 
will be a much happier place. 



"Transitions" program and a legacy 




Mark J. ZmiUc 



Where has Clarion 
University gone? Last time I 
checked, our official school 
colors were blue and gold. 
From the looks of it that has 
changed. 

The colors I see every- 
where are green, orange, 
and purple ...Transitions 
colors. Transitions has been 
a working program for the 
past two years. This year 
would be its third in effect. I 
think it's a good program for 
incoming freshmen and 



sophomores, just not good 
enough to recreate our insti- 
tution over. 

Alright, so Clarion prides 
itself on bringing students 
in, getting them oriented 
and forcing them to earn a 
useless credit for their 
degree audit by taking all 
the transitions courses. It 
more or less pushes stu- 
dents to familiarize them- 
selves with the campus, 
facilities and transitioning 
from high school to college. 

I'd like to know why 
Clarion doesn't have a 
Transitions program specifi- 
cally designed to transition 
out. The motto plastered all 
over our website states that 
Clarion is "investing in life- 
times". It seems like this 
slogan is all talk and no 
action. If you are gonna talk 
the talk CU, walk the walk 
baby. A program that would 
EFFECTIVELY transition 
students out of college and 
on to the next phase of their 
lives would build a stronger 




Uu >■ 

]Fii©§]Rp§gs 




university 

The program could focus 
on preparing juniors and 
seniors for the working 
world or further education. 

The program could also 
build relationships between 
graduating seniors and 
Alumni. Former Clarion 
University President Diane 
Reinhardt always asked the 
incoming freshman class, 
"What will your legacy be?" 
This type of program 
would steer students in a 
direction that could poten- 
tially be a long lasting and 
successful legacy not only 
for the student, but for the 
university. 



Clarion University stu- 
dents are bright, creative 
and very energetic. It seems 
like many Clarion students 
also get lost in the shuffle 
near graduation, leaving 
them to enter the real world 
confused and not knowing 
what to do next. 

Clarion should be focusing 
a little bit more on the stu- 
dents who are already 
enrolled and have already 
forked over the dough to 
attend Clarion. I'd like to 
see a new legacy; a transi- 
tion in and transition out 
without the shuffle. 

The author is a senior 
communication major. 



Have fun at home on the weekends 




s^ 



^AA- 




As the weekend approach- 
es, I can always be sure of 
three things; I will win a 
dance-off, my roommate, 
Chan, will pass out and get 
drawn on, and all the fresh- 
men will pack up and go 
home. How incredibly cool is 
that? I mean, obviously the 
dance-offs and roommate 
art already have a given sta- 
tus of coolness but going 
home? That's beyond cool. 
That's almost Tony Danza 
cool. 

Seriously, you go to college 
to get away from your fami- 
ly so you can learn how to 
live on your own. If this 
wasn't the case, then why 
even go to a college that's far 
away? Why not live with 
mommy and daddy the rest 
of your lives? 

Your parents sent you to 
college for one reason: to get 
you out of the house. 
They've had to deal with the 






Jason Bice 

Clamn Call Staff Writer 



fact that the condom broke 
for 18 years and when they 
finally get you out of the 
house you keep coming 
back. 

Not that any of you care 
about your parents anyway. 
I know the real reason you 
head home. 

For girls, they go home to 
see their boyfriends. You 
know, the ones who never 
went to college, are probably 
28 years old, and have that 
great job working at "The 
Shop." He's really going 
places, girls. This long-dis- 
tance relationship is sure to 
last. 

But do him a favor and not 
come home on the week- 
ends. It's not that he doesn't 
want to see you; it's just that 
the weekends are the best 
time to cheat on your girl- 
friend. Now you tell me how 
he's going to do that when 
you're around writing him 



cute little notes and telling 
him how much you love 
him? I mean, doesn't the 
verbal abuse and face slap- 
ping get a little old? 

For the guys it's not much 
different. They had better 
head home or else their girl- 
friends, who have just grad- 
uated middle school, will 
give them quite the nagging. 
Give it up, dude. She has to 
be in by 10, and it's not 
worth it. If you're looking for 
some action that bad, just 
find some drunk girl. 
Clarion has quite a few, and 
I'm sure they'd be more than 
willing to help you out. Now 
I'm not saying you should 
take advantage of drunk 
girls, I'm saying that if 
they're drunk and they want 
you, then do it. If she wakes 
up in the morning and 
regrets it, let that be a les- 
son to her. 

But don't worry guys, 
nothing like that will ever 
happen to you because you'll 
be watching your girl cheer 
at the big high school foot- 
ball game. That's another 
asinine reason to go home. 

"Hey Ricky, wanna stay 
here and party this week- 
end? There's gonna be mad 
girls at the Delta Iota Chi 
house." 

"Forget that, man. I'm 
going to the big game and 



then maybe hang out with 
all my high school friends at 
the local hot spot after- 
wards. My dad might even 
let us sleep outside in 
tents." 

I wouldn't be surprised if 
this was the conversation 
that happened every week 
between the wiser sopho- 
more roommate and the 
freshman he got stuck with. 
Who cares about the stupid 
high school football game. 
Just because you were towel 
boy the last four years does- 
n't mean you need to return 
and show your Beaver pride, 
or whatever the hell your 
mascot was. And stop wear- 
ing you're high school jacket 
around campus. It's stupid 
and no one cares that you're 
nickname was "Squirrelly." 

Now, you may all be won- 
dering why I even care if 
you guys go home. It's not 
really any of my business, 
right? Untrue. If all the 
freshmen girls go home, 
then how am I going to lure 
them to my apartment with 
promises of a "good time"? 
And I know that Clarion 
doesn't have very much stuff 
to do, but you chose to go 
here. So, instead of being 
five year-olds and running 
home each weekend, stay 
here and make new friends. 
Your old ones suck anyway. 




Chelsie Fisher 

Junior, Secondary Ed. Social Studh s 

"I usually get all dressed up in my Steelers 
apparel and watch the game with friends 
who join in with my by yelling at the TV." 



Call oi Yqv 



by Sara Hoover 

"What is your typical ritual before every NFL 

game?" 




Laquaya Garrett 

Senior, Liberal Studies 

"Pop some pop corn and get some Pepsi and 

make the prediction that the Steelers 

already won." 





Jessica Bayer 

Senior, Secondary Ed English 

"Before each game I hang out with my 

friends and watch the pregame. Its all about 

the commercials." 



Jamod Keeley 

Fki stivu n. Fine Arts 

"Call up some of my boys, get some snacks 
and drinks and get all set up for the game." 




Joseph Roberts 

Sophomore, Accountincj/Business 
Administration 

"Wear my Chiffs shirt and big daddy pants 
and a whole lot of cheap 'beverages'." 



Josh Pierce 

Sophomore, Sec. Ed. Social Sildii s 

"Shower, Chandler, Steeler attire and some 
sort of cheap 'beverages'." 




wm 



Page 6 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



September 15. 2005 



Feitms 



Beginning sign language class now offered at Clarion University 



Ariel Weaver 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

English, Spanish, and 
French may be the first 
three langiinges that come 
to mind when rating North 
America's top languages. 
However, as of 2004 sign 
language is the third most 
used language in the United 
States. In the past decade, 
libraries, clinics, hospitals, 
colleges and even high 
schools have started to offer 
sign language courses. 

As of Sept. 13 Clarion 
University professor Carol 
Johnson will be holding a 
beginning sign language 
course that will last until 
Oct. 20. The course will be 
set with pass/fail standards 
and is open to any universi- 
ty student and any individ- 
ual residing in the Clarion 
community. Johnson is hop- 
ing the cut-off will end with 
high school students. 

The beginning sign lan- 
guage course was started in 
hopes to enable people to 
communicate with deaf indi- 
viduals, whether they are 
fluent or just able to hold 
basic conversation. This 






course will be able to give 
comfort to individuals who 
come into contact with a 
deaf person or a person with 
a hearing disability. 

Since it is a beginning 
class those participating 
will learn basic signing and 
will study the deaf culture. 
It takes years to be able to 
interpret for the deaf. 
Therefore, students will be 
able to do simple signing 
like give directions to the 
phone or bathroom, or hold- 
ing short conversations like 
speaking about the weather. 

"Signing is a whole sepa- 
rate language in itself," said 
Johnson. "This course is not 
made to be a resume 
builder; it is made to obtain 
a true understanding for the 
deaf communication." 

Johnson has her Masters 
in Deaf Education, and 
interprets for deaf children 



and adults. Professor 
Johnson is partially deaf 
herself, so she knows the 
true commitment and skills 
signing takes. 

She is only one of many 
who sign. In fact, as of 
2004, 250,000-500,000 

Americans use ASL 
(American Sign Language). 
This may be due to the 7.5 
million people in the United 
States who have trouble 
using their voices or who are 
hearing impaired. 

Signing's roots stem back 
to Europe which dates back 
to the 16th century, when 
Geronimo Cardano, an 
Italian physician pro- 
claimed deaf people could be 
taught to understand writ- 
ten combinations of symbols 
by associating them with 
things they represent. 
Signing was then declared 
as "images that are 



displayed from the perspec- 
tive of the viewer, not the 
signer." 

In the 18th century Abbe 
De L' Epee of France devel- 
oped an early form of sign- 
ing called, "methodical 
signs." De L' Epee then 
founded the first school for 
the deaf in 1755 and used 
this methodical signing to 
teach his students French. 
Surprisingly, there was 
already a signing communi- 
ty in Paris when De L' Epee 
founded the school. In the 
end, deaf sisters ended up 
teaching him the basics of 
our current signing system. 
In addition to signing's 
European descent, the 
Native Americans also play 
a crucial role in its develop- 
ment. Today's ASL has 
many similar characteris- 
tics to the Native Americans 
intertribal communication; 



There's no place like home on or off campus 



Kevin Wetter 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

To some upperclassmen 
it's a small dreadful "box" 
that they refuse to step foot 
in. To some freshmen it's 
paradise, a home away from 
home. Everyone has their 
own opinion on dorm rooms. 

Some students hate being 
confined in a small room all 
year while others love the 
small room. Students that 
like dormitory life all have 
one common reason why: 
It's a great chance to meet 
new people. Sophomore Ben 
Elliott, a communication 
major, lived in the dorms 
last year and decided to 
move back in. Elliott even 
decided to move back to the 
same building and same 
floor. 

"It's an inexpensive way to 
make new friends. I had fun 
last year so I figured why 
not do it again," Elliott stat- 
ed. It is very easy to meet 
new people in the dorms 
because of all the scheduled 
activities, which range from 
pizza parties to talks on safe 
sex and even lemon juice 
shot contests. 

Upper-classmen, who lived 
in the dorms before, know 
what to expect as opposed to 
incoming freshmen. There 
are many thoughts that race 
through the minds of fresh- 
men right before they move 
into the dorms for the first 
time. 

Freshman Kristen Crum, 
undecided, said, "My biggest 
worry was not getting along 
with the girls on my floor." 
As many worries as fresh- 
man have, most of them 
quickly adapt to their new 
environment. 

"Everything is working out 
great. I introduced myself to 
the girls, asked them if they 
wanted to go out and just 
basically tried to be as 
friendly as possible," Crum 
commented. 

People that had a bad dor- 
mitory experience or just 
needed more space are on 
the other side of college 
housing; renting an apart- 
ment or house. Jake Lauer, 
a junior majoring in second- 
ary social studies education. 




Audrey F\ske/The Clarion Call 
DORM LIFE - Freshmen Megan Laskowski and Wendy Hollendonner call Givan 
Hall their home. 



rents an apartment with 
three other people and has 
been since his sophomore 
year. "There is more free- 
dom here, I don't have to put 
up with floor meetings, I 
have more privacy and peo- 
ple can come visit me when- 
ever they want instead of 
waiting for an escort," Lauer 
said. 

Having to deal with all the 
rules can become bother- 
some for some people. 

"I didn't have a problem 
with all the rules, but the 
one I couldn't stand was 
twenty-four hour quiet 
hours during mid-term and 
finals week," Lauer stated. 

Elliott also believes 
strongly against quiet 
hours. 

He said, "For the most 
part, quiet hours can be self- 
controlled. If someone has a 
problem with me playing my 
music too loud at night, they 
can just come and knock on 
my door instead of running 
straight to the R.A." 

Moving out of the dorms 
also makes some students 
feel more grown up. Lauer 
commented, "I am more on 
my own here, I make my 
own food and clean up after 
myself and no one tells me 
what to do." 

Even for those people who 
live in a house or apart- 
ment, dorm life wasn't all 
bad. 

Lauer commented, "I loved 
meeting new people. 
Another nice thing was 
being so close to campus." 



Some people also consider 
returning to the dorms to 
save money because off- 
campus living can become 
too expensive. 

"I would go back to the 
dorms my senior year and 
be a R.A. to save some 
money," said Lauer. 

Most of the population in 
dormitories is freshmen, but 
it is not required at Clarion 
University for freshmen to 
live in the dorms. The total 
number of residents that 
lived in the dorms in the fall 
of last year was 1,408, Nair 
Hall being the largest one. 
Jessica Crisswell a fresh- 
men majoring in biology, 
resides in Reinhard Villages 
and has her reasons for 
staying away from the 
dorms. 

"I like cooking my own 
food. I'm not a real big fan of 
public restrooms either," 
Crisswell stated. 

Off-campus living and 
campus living both have 
their pros and cons. The 
biggest pro for off- campus 
living is having the freedom 
to do whatever he or she 
wants within legal restric- 
tions. That is not necessari- 
ly true at Reinhard Villages. 
They also have a R.A. to reg- 
ulate the residents. 

Crisswell stated, "I really 
don't mind the R.A. so much 
they are just there to make 
sure everybody is safe." 

One of the biggest cons for 
off-campus living is having 
to do their own housework. 

"I don't really mind it 



sometimes. It's up to us if 
we want to trash our place 
or not so we keep that in 
mind when were cleaning. 
Plus I have three other peo- 
ple helping me do it," Lauer 
said. 

Dorm life also has its pros 
and cons. As opposed to off 
campus living a dorm resi- 
dent doesn't have to worry 
about housework. The most 
cleaning they have to do is 
making their beds and pick- 
ing their clothes off the floor. 
A common complaint people 
have about the dorms is hik- 
ing up that strenuous hill 
that starts by Tippin 
Gymnasium and ends by 
Chandler Dinning Hall. 

"I hate walking up that 
huge hill, especially in the 
winter. I have to walk it to 
get to almost everyplace on 
campus too," Elliott stated. 

There is also a hill to 
climb from Nair and 
Wilkinson Hall. Those hills 
may be less of a workout 
than walking several blocks 
to get to classes from off- 
campus though. 
This age old battle is going 
to go on forever. There are 
stereotypes for each housing 
option. In the dorms you're 
faced with cooking ramen 
noodles and wearing flip 
flops in the shower, whereas 
in an apartment, one has his 
or her own place to party 
and trash. 

Will anyone ever really be 
able to answer the question: 
Which is better, on or off 
campus living? 




Shasta Krutz and Kristen Staley/T/ie Clarion Call 



including the facial and 
body expressions which still 
play an integral part of the 
communication. 

Today we are fortunate 
enough to have one of the 
most complete and expres- 
sive sign language systems 
of any country in the world. 
Recently ASL has even been 
proven to work well with 
developing babies and indi- 
viduals with Autism. 
Signing has been used with 
infants so that they can 
communicate their wants 
and needs to their care- 
givers at an earlier age. 
Other advantages include: 
the child coming across the 
chance of being able to learn 
a different language easier 
in the future, and possibly 
being more susceptible to a 
higher I.Q. Signing also is 
now in the parent's best self- 
interest because it forms a 



higher level of trust with 
their child. 

The beginning sign lan- 
guage course started 
Tuesday, Sept. 13, and con- 
tinues every Tuesday and 
Thursday until Oct. 20. The 
class runs from 6-7:30 p.m. 
The course is arranged by 
the continuing education 
department. Don't fret if you 
are too late, the course will 
be provided to students next 
semester as well. Hopefully 
in the near future this 
course can be counted as 
university credits. Johnson 
continues to push for the 
course to become a credited 
class for ACT 48; and make 
the course open for teachers 
who need more credits to 
update their teaching 
degrees. The university is 
currently still working in 
the approval state. 



^ 



ASK wcro^ m^£:B 



Dear Dr. Eagle, 

My friends and I are concerned about gaining the 
dreaded Freshman Fifteen. Do you have any tips on how 
we can avoid putting on the extra pounds? 
Signed, 
Soon to be couch potato 



Dear soon to be couch 
potato, 

The reasons students 
gain weight when they 
come to college is because 
of the changes in their eat- 
ing habits and activity 
level. Daily exercise and a 
well balanced diet will 
help you maintain your 
weight. The rec center on 
campus is a great place to 
work out or play a sport. 
While the weather is still 
enjoyable you and your 
friends might consider 
going for a walk in the 
evening. If you live off 
campus, walk to class 
instead of driving. Also try taking the stairs instead of 
the elevator. 

The dining halls on campus offer varieties of high calo- 
rie and high fat foods, but there are also lowcalorie 
foods available. Choose broiled, grilled or baked meat or 
poultry instead of breaded items such as chicken 
nuggets or patties. Limit foods with cheese sauces, 
cream sauces, dressings, or gravies because these all 
contribute to extra pounds. Limit the amount of high fat 
spreads such as butter, mayonnaise, and cream cheese. 
Add more fiber into every meal such as whole grain cere- 
al or bread, legumes, and vegetables. If you do not like 
the vegetables on the grill get some from the salad bar 
and cook them in the microwave. When getting a salad 
from the salad bar watch the amount of dressing you 
use. One serving of dressing is one ounce and about 250 
calories. The fiber will fill you up with adding the extra 
calories. Drink water or low-fat milk instead of soda or 
juice. A can of regular soda contains 140 calories. Frozen 
yogurt is a good desert, but adding the candy and choco- 
late adds unnecessary calories. The main thing to watch 
out for is portions. Don't over fill your plate, just get 
enough to fill you up. 

Alcohol can also contribute to the Freshman Fifteen. A 
12 oz. beer has 140 calories, Smirnoff has 275 calories 
per drink, one wine cooler has 260 calories, a shot of 
vodka or gin is 120 calories, a shot of whiskey is 220 
calories, a shot of Southern Comfort is 184 calories and 
a shot of Bacardi has 118 calories. 




Doctor Eagle is written by Sarah Wilson, of the Keeling 
Health Center. For more information or to suggest a 
topic, please contact her at s_smwilson@clarion.edu. 



September 15. 2005 



Tm CLAMON CJILL 



Page 7 



Hip hop dance team gears up for new season 



Ashley E. Angle 
Features Editor 



Over the past few years 
hip hop dance has taken its 
place as an important art 
form in our culture. Hip hop 
choreography is used in 
music videos seen on TV, 
dances seen in clubs... and 
at Clarion University bas- 
ketball games. 

A new form of school spirit 
arrived in October 2004 
with the birth of Clarion 
University's very first hip 
hop dance team. After six 
individuals tried out for the 
Clarion Dance Team, but 
did not meet the require- 
ments of being trained in 
ballet and jazz, they decided 
to start their own. However, 
the four remaining mem- 
bers do have dance 
exprience. 

"The hip hop dance team 
gave another option for 
those individuals who love 
to dance, but weren't classi- 
cally trained. We felt that 
giving people another 
option, it would increase the 
number of participants in 
Clarion activities," said jun- 
ior secondary education 
social studies major Deanne 
Perry, who also minors in 
black studies and ancient 
Mediterranean studies. 

The dance team has 
become an outlet for many 
students. Some tried out 
because they knew people 
on the team, while others 
learned about it through 



friends. One thing members 
of the team have in common; 
they love to dance. 

"Ever since I was a little 
girl, I've danced. It's some- 
thing that came naturally," 
said senior elementary edu- 
cation major Erica Bojalad. 
"It makes me feel good," 
said sophomore marketing 
major Sarah Rossum. She 
also said that dance "helps 
relieve stress." 

"I love to dance because it 
gives me a way to express 
myself Dancing, although it 
can be hard, at times is very 
fun to me," said Perry. 

Bojalad and Rossum, 
along with teammates Perry 
and Alexis Branch, a sopho- 
more elementary education 
major, have danced for near- 
ly all their lives. Each girl 
took tap, jazz and ballet 
growing up. 

"While in high school I 
took every dance possible - 
jazz, tap, ballet and mod- 
ern," said Perry. 

Perry also attended a per- 
forming arts high school in 
her native state of 
Kentucky, which enabled 
her to spend most of her 
time dancing. 

So why hip hop? 

"It's a huge form of expres- 
sion," said Bojalad. She also 
added that it was a good 
way to "let loose." 

"Hip hop seemed fun," said 
Branch. 

It is also an art form where 
one doesn't need any train- 
ing. If one can move and has 
rhythm, he or she can dance 



hip hop. This form of danc- 
ing also allows the use of 
more up-todate, main- 
stream music. 

However, don't think hip 
hop is all fun and games or 
one of the easier dance gen- 
res. It takes a great deal of 
work too. The teams prac- 
tices two days a week, 
Mondays and Wednesdays. 
They also learn about five or 
six routines throughout the 
year. The choreography is 
created by the dancers 
themselves. 

"It takes hard work like 
any other group, period," 
said Branch. 

"Since we don't have a set 
choerographer as of now, 
anyone who is on the team 
can come to us with a dance 
that they have choreo- 
graphed, and if we vote to do 
it, then we do it," Perry 
explained. 

Last year, the team fin- 
ished with six dancers. Try- 
outs are set to take place on 
Sept. 21 and 22 in Tippin 
Dance Studio from 6-8:30 
p.m. The first night, partici- 
pants are taught a dance 
and the second night hope- 
fuls perform it as his or her 
try-out. 

"Anyone who is interested 
must be present both days," 
Perry said. 

As of last year and on top 
of practices the hip hop 
dance team performed at 
both men's and women's 
basketball games. They are 
looking for more places to 
perform this year. 




Photo courtesy Clarion University Hip Hip Dance Team 

DANCE FEVER - (left to right) Alexis Brancti, Deanne Perry, Erica Bojalad and Sarah Rossum 
look forward to a new season on the hip top dance team. 



"Right now we only per- 
form at basketball games. 
We are also willing to dance 
at any other events if we are 
invited," said Perry. "We 
plan to dance at football 
games by next football sea- 
son." 

Perhaps performing is the 
best part of being on the 
team. 

"I love to get up in front of 
crowds and perform, it gives 
a rush," said Perry. 

Bojalad, Rossum and 
Branch also agree that they 
love to perform. 

Bojalad adds, "When we 
get out on the floor we 
become one." 

Some team goals this year 
are to expand membership, 
entertain the crowd and get 
the hip hop dance team's 
name out. 

"I want to make the cam- 
pus more aware we're here," 



said Rossum. 

Other goals include to sim- 
ply do the best they can and 
make the campus more cul- 
turally diverse. 

There are many perks to 
working hard as a team to 
accomplish goals and many 
of the girls have favorite 
things about being a part of 
the team. 

"I enjoy everything about 
being on the team. Meeting 
new people; actually learn- 
ing new things from other 
people," Perry said. "1 also 
like being able to show peo- 
ple what we worked hard to 
do." 

Branch said that by being 
able to be a part of the team 
she was able to meet a lot of 
new people and made a lot 
of new friends. 

The sense of pride that 
comes from being a part of 
the hip hop dance team over 



shadows all the negatives, 
such as the struggle to 
become a recognized student 
organization and the con- 
flicts that arise within the 
team. 

"I feel empowered to be a 
part of Clarion's campus," 
said Rossum. 

"Being a part of this team 
means a great deal to me," 
said Perry. "All of the origi- 
nal members worked very 
hard to get this team togeth- 
er and it shows that hard 
work and persistence pays 
off" 

Perhaps the most impor- 
tant thing to remember 
about hip hop is that it 
greatly differs from the 
other genres of dance. 

"Hip hop can't be learned 
how to do," said Bojalad. 
"It's something you're born 
with." 



Students learn more about scrapbooking at UAB's ''Scrapbook America" event 



Kurt Boyd 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 



Put yourself in the posi- 
tion of the typical college 
undergraduate. It's Monday 
night and the start of yet 
another week of classes. 
Aside from all the hours of 
studying, what other activi- 
ties can you do in Clarion? 
On Monday Sept. 12 at 8 
p.m., a craft workshop was 
put on in 248 Gemmell to 
give students the opportuni- 
ty to come together . 

"Thinking of being original 
and doing something differ- 
ent that people can take 
home," is how University 



Activities Board arts chair, 
Esteban Brown, explains 
the basis of putting on these 
biweekly workshops. With a 
set budget given to him from 
UAB, Esteban had to budget 
his activities for the entire 
semester. It wasn't a semi- 
nar on how to make a scrap- 
book, but more of an envi- 
ronment in which it was 
easy to make them. It also 
gave students an opportuni- 
ty to mingle amongst one 
another, meet new people 
and bond with people they 
wish to get to know a little 
bit better. 

"It brings a lot of people 
together to do different 
activities," states Marissa 
Angevine, a Clarion 



University sophomore who 
was one of 14 students in 
attendance. Throughout the 
remainder of the semester 
there will be different activ- 
ities introduced such as jew- 
elry making, plate making, 
painting, hemp art and clay 
art. 

"Stamping or a tie dyed 
night for tee shirts would be 
fun," were just a few more 
suggestions given by sopho- 
more Arryn Murray. 

Scrapbooking started back 
in the year 1826 in part with 
the published work of John 
Poole's book "Manuscript 
Gleanings and Literary 
Scrapbook." It presented a 
unique and interesting way 
to display poems and 



stories. 

The next craft services 
night will take place on 
.^^onday, Sept. 26 in the 
Gemmell Student complex. 
The theme for the next craft 
service night will be posted 
on flyers around Clarion 
University's campus in the 
upcoming weeks. It's at no 
cost to students, and there 
is no set time limit that you 
have to stay at each work- 
shop. 

Watch the bulletin boards 
for the theme of the next 
workshop, and don't be 
afraid to bring a friend. The 
workshops start at 8 p.m., 
but the finish of each work- 
shop is up to the individuals 
partcipating. 




Morris Pratt/The Clarion Call 
SCRAPBOOK AMERICA - Students created scrapbooks on 
Sept. 13. 



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Pages 



Tffi CLARION CilLL 



September 15. 2005 



September 15, 2005 



EiUHiiiMdit 

Matt Ryczek finds new fans in Clarion 



Kim Cammuso 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Sept. 12 - Ryan 
Boxleitner, a sophomore 
molecular biology major 
from Grove City College, 
said, "Yeah, I drove all the 
way from Grove City to see 
Pete Schmidt, because I love 
the acoustic rhythms to his 
music. I haven't heard much 
from Matt Ryczek, except 
for one of his songs called 
"Goodbye," which is about 
the twin towers. It combines 
the idea of tragedy and 
serenity at the same time ~ 
a beautiful, meaningful 
song. I am excited to hear 
more of his music, though. 
It should be a good show." 



Matt Ryczek and Pete 
Schmidt performed on Mon., 
Sept. 12 in Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room at 8 p.m., 
sponsored by the 

Universities Activities 

Board. 

Most people came to see 
Schmidt because he opened 
for The Clarks at last 
spring's CampusFest. 

Although Pete Schmidt 
already had a fan base at 
Clarion, it was different 
when it came to Ryczek, an 
up-and coming artist from 
Georgia. 

This was Ryczek's chance 
to share his talents with the 
people of Clarion University 
and to let them know what 
his music was all about, and 
he did just that. 




Jonathon Oonelll/rhe Clarion Call 

Schmidt and Ryczek - Pete Schmidt (left) Matt Ryczek (right) 
and perform in Gemmell l\/lulti-Purpose Room. They played a 
few songs together at the end of the night. 



At about 8:15 p.m., Ryczek his face, sporting an army 
walked on to the stage with green tee, a newsboy cap to 
a bright, confident smile on match, and a red and white 



wrist band on his right arm. 
Ryczek interacted with the 
audience as he stood there 
tuning his guitar getting 
ready to perform. He sang a 
set of about seven or eight 
songs, mostly about love and 
relationships. It was obvi- 
ous that the girls were a lot 
more into it than the guys, 
especially since Ryczek 
interacted with the females 
in the audience by making 
little gestures and winks. 

Sophomore Katie Shick, 
communication science dis- 
order major, said, "It's unbe- 
lievable that such a musical- 
ly talented person hasn't 
made it into the 'big stage' 
yet. I loved the music, lyrics 
and every- 
thing 



about the performance." 

Senior Michelle Rainelli, 
elementary/special educa- 
tion major, said, "Matt was 
amazing. His music touched 
me to my soul. It's refresh- 
ing to see a musician with so 
much talent. His personali- 
ty and music was unbeliev- 
able. All I can say 
is... WOW!" 

It is undoubted that 
Ryczek's music touched a lot 
of hearts that night and def- 
inite that 
he gained 
many 
new 
fans. 




Schmidt returns after CampusFest f^ 



Jared Sheatz 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Sept. 12 - 
Georgia native, Pete 
Schmidt, graced Clarion 
University with his pres- 
ence Monday night in 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
Room. Chris Kochanov, geol- 
ogy major, said, "Yeah. I'm 
pretty excited. I saw him 
last year at Campusfest." 

About a hundred people 
showed up to see Schmidt, 



according to UAB Concert 
Chair Mike McDonald, 



(( 



Yeah, I'm pretty 
excited. I saw him last 
year at CampusFest. 

- Chris Kochanov 
j> 



senior communication 

major. "Since he's been here 



once or twice, he would pick 
up more of a following," 
McDonald explained why 
UAB had Schmidt back 
after CampusFest. "He con- 
tacted us. He was going 
through on tour." 

Schmidt interacted with 
the crowd well, telling jokes 
and making comments 
between songs while tuning 
up guitar. He featured songs 
such as "Just So You Know," 
which was performed with 
Lisa, a girl from the audi- 
ence. He also talked about 



missing his home state of 
Georgia in "Back to 
Georgia." He played numer- 
ous other songs also such as 
"Someday" and "Angels." 
But he finished it off with 
the song he said is always 
his closer, "Dream." 

The smaller crowd that 
attended seemed to be very 
excited to hear the musician 
play. There was plenty of 
clapping and cheering going 
on after songs. Laughter lit 
the room after Schmidt's 
jokes. 



Pete Schmidt will 
be right up your 
alley if you like 
artists such as 
John Mayer. 
Pete's album 
"No Safe Bet" 
was being sold at the back of 
the room. "They sold quite a 
bit of CDs and stuff," 
McDonald said. 

"It was a good show," L^^, 
McDonald said. MS 





IBS 



Staniforth delivers "magical" performance 




Kevin Colonna 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Sept. 14 ■ 
Clarion students dropped 
their jaws in amazement as 



(( 



Everyone should have 
seen this show! 

- Ashley Reed and 
Jamie McNamara 



magician Nate Staniforth lit 
up the stage with amazing 
acts and feats in the 
Gemmell Multi-pur 
pose room on Sept. 
14, sponsored by 
the Universities 
Activity Board. 
Staniforth 
started the 
evening with 
an incredible 
trick in which 
he swallowed 
thread, fol- 
lowed by four 
needles, then 
pulled the 

thread 
back 



out of his mouth with the 
needles threaded on it. After 
his opening act, Staniforth 
informed the audience that 
his goal was not to tell jokes 
and get all dressed up. His 
only goal was to "amaze" the 
audience. "It was phenome- 
nal. I felt like I was watch- 
ing a TV show. It was very 
impressive," said sophomore 
Clyde Smith, psychology 
major. Sophomore Jessica 
Link said, "It was spectacu- 
lar, really amazing, and he 
was really cute!" 

Staniforth proceeded by 
performing a few card 
tricks, which according to 
him are "every magician's 
obsession." The Hghts were 
then dimmed as Staniforth 
showed the audience a short 
video that he had recorded 
earlier in the day doing 
"street magic" all over the 
Clarion University campus. 
The video concluded with an 
amazing trick that he had 
filmed of himself four years 
ago during his freshman 
year at 




Devon Yorkshire/ T/ie Clarion Call 

Nate staniforth - Two strong guys from the audience tie 
magician Staniforth into a straight-jacket. He later escaped. 




Iowa University. 

The feat involved 
Staniforth shackling him- 
self in chains and weights, 
then jumping into the 52 
degree water of the Iowa 
City River and then re-sur- 
facing a few minutes later 
with no chains attached. 
Staniforth laughingly stat- 
ed, "It was very illegal for 
me to do that. I almost got 
thrown out of college for it." 
Just when everyone 
thought that the video was 
astonishing, Staniforth fol- 
lowed by calling two "big, 



strong, guys" from the audi- 
ence and requesting that 
they buckle him up in a 
straight jacket as tight as 
they possibly could. 

After a few minutes of 
squirming and rolling 
around, Staniforth success- 
fully escaped from the 
straight jacket as the audi- 
ence applauded, shocked 
and astounded. 

Staniforth's concluding act 
involved the entire audi- 



ence, he told everyone to 
take out their cell phones 
and call someone. 
The first three people to get 
a hold of someone stood up 
He then chose one person to 
remain standing. He 
instructed the person stand- 
ing to ask the person on the 
phone to think of any play- 
ing card, tell it to the other 
person then hang up. 

Staniforth then gave a 
deck of cards to the person 
standing, and, sure enough, 
the first card in the deck 
was the card the person on 
the phone picked. 

Sophomore Ashley Reed, 
biology major, and freshman 
Jamie McNamara, history 
major, said, "We thought he 
was great. He wasn't fake 
like a lot of magicians, and 
he was really down to earth, 
as if he were another college 
student. Everyone should 
have seen this show!" 

Staniforth has been prac- 
ticing magic since he was 
eight years old, where he 
would frequently perform 
shows for his parents. 

He started to perform 
organized shows while he 
was in high school and is 



now on his first national 
tour. About his work, 
Staniforth said "I love it. It's 
amazing that I'm getting 



(( 



It was very illegal for 
me to do that (jumping 
into icy water while 
chained). I almost got 
thrown out of college 
for it 

- Nate Stanforth 



paid to do this. It is hard 
work, though. You have to 
look at it just like a job. I 
practice between five and 
eight hours a day in order to 
perfect every act I perform." 
Currently, Staniforth is 
continuing his tour across 
the country. Upon comple- 
tion, he plans on making a 
video documentary of all his 
shows and performances, 
including his upcoming 
escape act, in which he 
plans on being chained up, 
then buried alive. 



(( 



/ love it It's amazing 
that I'm getting paid to 
do this. It is hard 
work, though. You 
have to look at it just 
like a job. I practice 
between five and eight 
hours a day in order 
to perfect every act I 
perform. 

- Nate Staniforth 

» 



NATE STANIFORTH 

Devon Yorkshire/The Clarion Call 




Devon Yorkshlre/nie Clarion Call 

Staniforth Interacts with crowd- Magician Staniforth interacts with the crowd. About 125 
people attended the UAB sponsored event on Sept. 14. 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



Open Mic Night gives coffee stiop setting p^iiyiiMiiinimM^iiynMiHuimM^iimiMiHBmi 




Jon Gofer 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJccofer@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 13 - 
University Activities Board 
(UAB) held the first Open 
Mic Night of the year on 
Sept. 13 at 8 p.m. in 
Gemmell Ritazza. Eleven 



u 



We have a UAB Open 
Mic Night once a 
month, usually on a 
Tuesday, for students 
to show off the r 
talents. 

- Danny Dively 

performers took the micro- 
phone for 15 minutes each 
in front of as many as 120 
onlookers, seated on the 
couches and carpet. Most 



studi-nt.s said they showed 
up to .support a performing 
friend, or just to listen to 
music aiul hang out. Tlu' 
event lasted until nearly 11 
p.m. 

Danny Dively. union chair 
for the UAB was in charge 
of the show. He checked per- 
formers in and gave them 
their time slots. Dively said. 
"We have a UAB sponsored 
Open Mic Night once a 
month, usually on a 
'l\iesday, for students to 
show off their talents." So 
how do you know when the 
next one will be? Keep an 
eye out for postings, espe- 
cially in the Gemmell 
Student Center as each new 
month begins. 

Being a theater major, 
sophomore Andy Roos is 
used to performing before 
audiences, but this was his 
first time playing guitar and 
singing before a crowd. 
When asked if he's used to 
being nervous from acting 
he said, "You're never used 
to being nervous. It's some- 
thing you just have to over- 
come and deal with." A Pearl 
Jam cover was the first song 
he played, starting off the 
event on the acoustic track 
it would stay on through 
most of the night. 

Gorav "G" Gulati, senior 




Lisa Sagan/rfie Clarion Call 

Desmond Hollis - Mollis closed Open Mic Night with a 
spoken-word performance. 




Travis Dane 

his guitar. 



Lisa Sagan/r/ie Clarion Call 

Dane performs for Open Mic Night and plays 



communication major, 

agreed. "Of course I get 
nervous, I'm actually shak- 
ing right now!" he said, 
right before he went up to 
the mic to cover Dave 
Matthews Band. "I don't 
mind if my songs are good or 
not. I just want to entertain 
people and have fun." 

Justin Jones, sophomore 
secondary education social 
studies major, said he's 
nervous until he "hits that 
first or second note. ' He said 
he loves playing at Open 
Mic Night. "It's a way you 
can experiment with your 
music, and see if people 
accept it or not. Plus it's just 
a fun time." Jones played a 
few songs, including a cover 
of Bob Dylan's "Knocking 
On Heaven's Door." 

Ryan Waterman, sopho- 
more English major, has a 
different way of dealing 
with her fear. "I get nervous, 
but I use it as energy and 
excitement to help me play," 
she said. Waterman was one 
of the crowd favorites, play- 
ing heartfelt original 
acoustics. "All music is 
beautiful," she said, "music 
opens people up and I love 
meeting new people and 
making friends." 

Jeremy "Pete" Clay, soph- 
omore psychology major, fre- 
quents this event. "I played 
just about every one last 



year," he said. "I don't really 
get nervous anymore simply 
because I got to know every- 
one I'm playing in front of." 
Clay also said, "Respect all 
music, whether you like it or 
not." 



« 



You're never used to 
being nervous. It's 
something you just 
have to overcome and 
deal with. 

- Andy Roos 

— — — n 

Desmond Hollis, freshman 
accounting major, took his 
spot at the microphone as 
the night's last performer. 
He did two songs, but much 
different than anyone else 
had. Hollis went up without 
a guitar or any background 
music, giving a hip-hop 
influenced spoken-word per- 
formance of his poetry. After 
he admitted he really wasn't 
nervous, he said, "I've actu- 
ally only performed in front 
of a crowd one other time. I 
decided to do this last 
minute. I saw a sign for it 
and said 'Why not?'" About 
his pieces, he said, "It's what 
I love, it's my passion. I have 
about fifty of these 
memorized." 



The (not-so-scary) Exorcism of Emily Rose' 



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Nathan Stahlman 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

"The Exorcism of Emily Rose" 
Director: Scott Derrickson 
Sony Pictures 
rating: 3/5 l|t i^^ l|r 

Having seen only trailers, 
and not read anything about 
this film, I was under the 
assumption that I was going 
to see a horror movie when I 
went to see "The Exorcism 
of Emily Rose." It's been a 
long time since I've seen a 
horror movie that I really 
liked but thought this one 
looked intriguing. What I 
didn't expect was this film to 
be more of a courtroom 
drama than a horror movie. 



This movie, which is based 
on a true story, centers on a 
court case in which a priest 
(Tom Wilkinson) is accused 
of negligent homicide when 
a girl dies shortly after he 
performed a failed exorcism. 
His lawyer (Laura Linney) 
must defend him against an 
arrogant state prosecutor 
(Campbell Scott) while 
fighting her own demons 
and going through a reli- 
gious conundrum herself. 

Throughout the trial. 
Father Moore (Wilkinson) 
cares far less about the out- 
come as he does about 
telling Emily's amazing 
story. Through the testimo- 
ny of Father Moore and 
Emily's friends and family, 
we see glimpses into Emily's 
(Jennifer Carpenter's) life 
before and during her "pos- 
session." 

While the prosecution 
claims her "possession" was 
actually a severe case of 
epilepsy and could have 
been cured through medical 
treatment,Defense Attorney 



Erin Bruner (Linney) can 
only raise the question "Is it 
possible?" as their best 
defense. 

Though the courtroom 
scenes seemed more like a 
television show than a 
movie, the strategically 
placed flashbacks held my 
attention well enough to 
make this film worth watch- 
ing. The acting wasn't all 
that spectacular but I don't 

We didn't really get a 
look into the lives of 
any characters in 
this film. 



think that was the actors' 
fault. We didn't really get a 
look into the lives of any 
characters in this film. Even 
Emily Rose is still a 
stranger at the end of the 
movie. The film was also a 
bit slow moving for a so- 
called horror. Had they sped 
it up some we may have had 



time to get to know a couple 
of the characters. 

Though 1 did jump a cou- 
ple times during the move, 
this was definitely not a hor- 
ror and should not have 
been advertised as such. 
When I see an exorcism 
movie, I expect to see heads 
spinning 360 degrees, pro- 
jectile vomit and desecra- 
tion of the crucifix. All that 
is given in this movie are a 
couple screams, a girl talk- 
ing in languages she is 
assumed not to know and a 
couple of run-ins with the 
devil. Had I not been tricked 
into thinking this was a hor- 
ror movie, I'm sure I would 
have liked it much more. 
If you want to see a scary 
exorcism movie, stay home 
and rent "The Exorcist," but 
if you want to see a drama, 
based on a true story, that 
raises the question "Is it 
possible that demons are 
real?" then go see "The 
Exorcism of Emily Rose" 
because now, you won't be 
disappointed. 



In a local feand? 

Send your press info to : 

The Clarion Call 

270 Gemmell Complex 

Clarion, PA 16214 



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The Longest Yard' a 
few touchdowns short 

This weekend's UAB movie night featured "The Longest 
Yard" in Pierce Auditorium. In this movie, Adam 
Sandler manages to hold back from his typical loud and 
obnoxious behavior. Despite the movie's simplicity, I 
found myself laughing with the rest of the auditorium. 

The orignial '74 version of "The Longest Yard" starred 
Burt Reynolds, who appears as a co-star in this remake. 
Chris Rock also has a large role and delivers his trade- 
mark politically incorrect humor. The supporting cast 
prisoners actually make the movie, however, including 
roles by Bob Sapp, Nelly and Michael Irvin that are sur- 
prisingly well done. 

The plot is pretty weak.as expected of a Sandler com- 
edy. Sandler, a jailed ex-quarterback, has to coach a foot- 
ball team of convicts. They are set to play the abusive 
and athletic guards. The comedy (especially of the sup- 
porting cast) definitely shines through. 

The soundtrack is a little too MTV influenced, and the 
ploc turns are mostly very predictable. I'd recommend 
checking out "The Longest Yard" if you want a few 
laughs without the expense of a complicated plot. 

JON GOFER 

'Family Guy' movie 
to be reieased 

The popular animated sitcom "Family Guy" will be 
releasing its straight to DVD movie "Stewie Griffin: The 
Untold Story!" on Sept. 27. The film centers on the 
Griffin family's 1-yearold maniacal son Stewie. who 
puts his plan for world domination on hold in order to 
travel across the country' to find whom he believes to be 
his real father. Of course the film also includes the 
wacky antics of the rest of the Griffin family, including 
Peter Griffin's fifteen minutes of fame on his news seg- 
ment "You Know What Grinds My Gears?" 

KEVIN COLONNA 



Qood & Random 

Finding decent local music is a hard task, but findmg 
"good" local music is pretty much a challenge. Hopefully 
you all had a great summer and were able to catch a lot 
of great shows. Unfortunately due to the fact that I 
spent my entire summer working, I only saw a few, 
which is why I started to listen to more local Pittsburgh 
music this summer. 
I actually found a "good" local band and had the chance 

to get to know them and 
see them rock out. 
The only good thing that 



Local music 
at it's finest 




Elisa Borger 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_emborger@clarion.eclu 



comes from spending the 

whole summer slaving 

away at a job is the chance 

to meet some cool people. 

Interestingly enough, my 

two friends who I met at 

work, Mike Overly and 

Jenn Twaddle, mentioned 

that they are in a band 

Molly Orange, and that 

Twaddle is the singer. 

Cool, a band with a girl 

singer. That day they gave 

me their CD. 

Soon after, they asked me if I would take photographs 
of them for the "Hey Sherman!" compilation they were 
going to be on, just recently released. After listening to 
them at practice, twice a week, and listening to their full 
length CD, "Hammerhead!," I realized that they were 
probably one of the most dedicated bands I'd ever 
known, 

Mike Overly and Ben Millward switch it up depending 
on the song, both playing guitar and drums. Scott Lipko 
plays bass, and Jenn Twaddle is on vocals. Together they 
are the four talented musicians making up the band 
Molly Orange. 

Over the summer, Molly Orange played numerous 
shows, including one with Black Tie Revue, with Clarion 
University graduate Jesse Ley on keyboards. They 
played at different bars throughout Pittsburgh, includ- 
ing the 31 Street Pub, but they hope to soon travel out- 
side of Pittsburgh to play shows. 

Another thing that gives Molly Orange such a unique 
sound is that no two songs on their CD sound alike. They 
range from slow to loud, to metal, to fast; they have got 
it all. Influenced by such bands as The Pixies, Melvins 
and Go Sailor, the band Molly Orange is here to rock a 
town near you. Molly Orange's Web site 
(www.myspace.com/mollyorange) has information on 
show dates. 



JOIN 



T K E 



Rushtkecu@hotmail.com 

www.tkeclarion.org/rush.htm 

Rush Chair: Bryan MuUins 



The Best go Greek but the Elite go 
Teke 



Page 10 



TIE CLAMOW CALL 



September 15. 2005 



tlmiMs 



fireck Ids. Trdvcl, EmpliiiMl. Fur lti>iil, I'monak and ^mn\ ids 



liE£KS 



Welcome back to all my fab- 
ulous Tri Sigma sisters! 
Good luck this semester. 
•I^Megan 

Good luck everyone with 
recruitment. 

-13 

Congrats to Kelsi Wilcox the 
new Panhel Secretary! 
-VYour Sigma Sisters 

Thanks for all who helped 
Tri Sigma reach their goal of 
sending 100 cards to hospi- 
talized children and donat- 
ing to our philanthropy! 
"I^The sisters of III 



Congrats Shiiwii Hoke on 
becoming National 

President 
-KAP 

Congrats Chad on the schol- 
arship. 
-KAP 

Congrats to the Shlubby of 
the Week! Frank Dimarco 
-KAP 

Congratulations to our 
Leadership Team for being 
Sisters of the Week. Keep up 
your outstanding work! 

•Lnvo, the Sifters of A<I>I 

FOREMT 



641 Railroad Street. 3 stu- 



dents looking for roommate 
for 5 bedroom house. $1100 
a semester. Call Brandon at 
724-448-6279 

APARTMENTS for 3-4 peo- 
ple and HOUSES for 47 
people available for the Fall 
2006/Spring 2007 

semesters. Get a great place 
for next year! Call Barb at 
814-2260767 or 814-379- 
9721 for more info. 




anr 



G£N£Riy. 



Judo: Learn sport judo, self 
defense. Compete in tourna- 
ments. All welcome; people 
of all ages and sizes. 
Tuesday and Thursday at 
6: 15 p.m. in wresthng room 
of Tippin Gymnasium. 



TRAVfeL 



Low prices guaranteed. Free 
Meals and Free Drinks. 
Book 11 people, get the 12th 
trip free! Group discounts 
for 6-f 

www.SpringBreakDiscounts 
.com or 

www.LeisureTours.com or 
800-838-8202. 



IMPLO^ENT 



Local business seeks com- 
puter programmer for E- 
commerce project Excel and 
Front Page a must. E-mail 
Charlie at centurymfg@all- 
telnet. 




RSONALS 



Physically liandicapped fac- 
ulty member needs assis- 
tance in swimming once or 
twice a week. Will pay $12 
per session. Contact Dr. 
Lynn Smith at 226-6675 or 
e-mail lsmith@clarion.edu. 




9/15/05 



Ashley and Janine, 
Let's have an awesome sen- 
ior year... Its the last blast! 
"What the deuce!?" 
•Luv, Ash 

John, 

You are my friend. Thanks 

for getting me laid. 

-Chelsey 

I bring great justice with the 
magic trash talking ham- 



mer! (In place of Hawk, who 

is now 24.) 

-Paul 

Jamie, 

Gave the best gift for when I 

go senile. I love the bunny! 

-Mousy/Paul 

Mrs. Wonderful, 
I can't wait for PSU with 
your family and Maddie's 
friends on Sat! 1 love you! 
•Mr. Wonderful 



Hawk, 

Happy belated 
Love you! 
-Mel 



birthday! 



Tara, 

1 miss you so much! Hurry 

up and visit! 

-Your brother 



Doug Knepp - Intramural, Recreation. & Club Sport Director 393-1667 



Intramural Schedule Fall 2005 



Activity; 

BEACH VOLLEYBALL 
OUTDOOR SOCCER 
DODGEBALL 
FLAG FOOTBALL 
VOLLEYBALL 
ULTIMATE FRISBEE 
1 PITCH SOFTBALL 
GOLF SCRAMBLE 
IN-LINE HOCKEY 
TENNIS 

FIELD GOAL CONTEST 
10 K RELAY 
POW ER LIFTING 
INDOOR SOCCER 
1 ON 1 BASKETBALL 
CHALLENGE COURSE 
HORSESHOE PITCHING 
CLOSEST TO THE PIN 
TUG OF WAR 
3 ON 3 BASKETBALL 
BIKE RACE 
TABLE TENNIS 
TUBE H20 BASKETBALL 
BADMINTON 
FREE THROW 
WHIFFLEBALL 
SWIM MEET 



Registration Due: 
ASAP 
ASAP 
ASAP 
ASAP 
ASAP 
ASAP 
10/7 
9/23 
9/20 
9/21 
9/23 
9/24 
10/4 
10/5 
10/6 
10/7 
10/8 
10/11 
10/13 
10/14 
10/15 
10/18 
10/25 
11/1 
11/8 
11/15 
11/17 
12/10 



BIG BUCK CONTEST 
FREE AGENT List; Sign-up for any sport as a "Free Agent" if 
you are by yourself and want to join and play with anotlier team! 



Upcoming Events: 

4 person GOLF SCRAMBLE 

Thursday, 9/22 and Monday, 9/26 

Clarion Oaks Country Club 

Register your team at the Rec center, then call the 
course at 226-8888 to reserve a tee time. This is an 18 
hole best ball scramble. Students golf for V2 price- $8.50 
(Cart not included and you must follow course policies.) 

M.S. BIKE TOUR 

COOK FOREST RIVER RIDE 
-40 MILE LOOP- 
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2005 

Register on-line: WWW.NATIONALMSSOCIETY ORG 

OR CALL HOTLINE AT 412.261 .6347 

SHEETS AVAILABLE AT THE REC CENTER 

It*s not too late,,. 

The Intramural office will still accept teams that want to 
play Dodgeball, CO-REC Soccer, Volieyball, 
Ultimate Frisbee, or Flag Football. 

Intramural ^s on the Web 
clavioii.edu/iiitramurals 

Or from the CUP home page: 

click on Athletics then Intramurals. 

Find out details about every sport including rules, roster 
limitations, schedules and results. See your team in 
action with new pictures posted every week. 

^'REGISTER ON-LINE" E-Mail questions / comments 




9/15/05 



Flag Football Results 

Tuesday, 9/13 

Quick 6 

Schlitz's 

The Heat 

No Ma*am 

Lady Canes 

KDR 

Bench Press This 



Just Ball 
The Beers 
Da HuStlaz 
Steelers 
Free Bailer's 
Hard Muffins 
Prime Time 

Monday, 9/12 
Quick 6 
Schlitz's 
Prime Time 
Free Bailers 
Beers 
Da Hustlaz 
Just Ball 



No Ma'am 
Lunatics 
The Heat 
Nuphies 
KDR 

Bench Press This 
Boondock Saints 
Outdoor Soccer Results 

Tuesday, 9/13 

Crushers 
Team #2 



Internationals 
Team #1 

Monday, 9/12 
Brew Crew 
The Internationals 



Raging Rhinos 
Team #2 

Dodgeball Results 

Tuesday, 9/13 and Monday, 9/12 
Ex Ballaz 
ivOR 

Second to None 
Second to None 
Ex Ballaz 
S W Suffrage 



S W Suffrage 
Team Beat It 
SH Waffle Irons 
Trash Monkeys 

NADS 

S H Waffle Irons 



44-28 

46-10 

39-3 

29-9 

27-23 

48-8 

44-3 

69-32 

41-33 

45-18 

34.9 

29-8 

38-2 

43-14 



F 

4-0 

3-0 
7-1 



2-1 
2-0 
2-1 
2-1 
2-1 
2-0 




ALL THE TIME!!! 

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Expires 5/15/06 — Additional Toppings 1.59 




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September 15. 2005 



Tlffi CLARION Ciyj. 



Page 11 



S/$rts 



Join Hands Through Service 




'^'^'^ Vl^ay OaS °^ 



Volunteers Needed 
For: 

Yard Work 

Tutoring 

Cleaning 

Landscaping 

Painting 

Office Registration 

Website Design 

Winterizing 

Booth Sales 

Event Set-up 

Activities 

Register at Community 

Service Learning Office 

114 Egbert Hall 

or call 393-1865 or e-mail 

CUService@clarion.edu 



Swimmers Dive 
into First Season 



Josh Woods 
Sports Editor 

sJlwoocls@clanon.edu 



Clarion County United Way SK Race 



The United Way of Clarion County will hold its 21st Annual SKRace on Saturday, October 10 as part of an Autumn Leaf 
Festival Event. The course stretches from Main Street, through the Autumn Leaf Festival area, around Clarion 
University Campus, and ending with a lap around the University track. Long sleeved t'shirts, boxed lunches from 
Sheetz, beverages from Wal-Mart and fruit from the Clarion Fruit Company will be provided for the first 200 registered 
runners. Cash prizes totaling up to $1200 will be awarded to the top three male and female runners. Medals will also 
be awarded in the different age groups. Registration will begin at 7:30 a.m. at the stadium. The race begins at 9 a.m 
and the cost is $15.00. Special discounts are being offered to families/individuals/friends/co-workers running together. If 
an organization, family, etc. has three individuals or more respresenting the cost is only $12.00 per runner. 
Anyone is able to participate, and all proceeds will benefit the Fitzgerald Ramp Project. For more information contact 
the Clarion United Way at (814) 226-8760 or unitedway@usachoice.net and include your full name and mailing address 



Registered for a Broadcast Co-curricular? 

Read the News for 91.7 WCUC-FM 

All interested students should contact WCUC News Director, 
Chrissy Hudson @ s_clhudson@clarion.edu 



It's September and the 
Clarion Golden Eagle men's 
swimming and diving sea- 
son is now less than a 
month away. Which can 
mean only one thing: prac- 
tice has begun for the pro- 
gram's most recent recruits. 
This year's class includes 
eight new faces made up of 
seven swimmers and one 
diver. 

A.J. Claypool, Andy 
Wolverton, Axel Casio, Jon 
Wallace, Nate Cohen, Matt 
Krieder and Paul Ubbink 
are the newest members to 
test the waters, while Erich 
Spessand is the lone incom- 
ing diver. 

Recruiting, which has 
always been an integral 
part of Clarion's storied 
success in swimming and 
diving, and this year as in 
year's past was just that: a 
success. 

"I've been coming to swim 
camps here for seven years; 
I kept coming back because 
of how well I liked the 
coaches and how well I 
knew the campus," said 
Ubbink who hails from 
Rochester, N.Y. Perhaps 
more specific were Claypool 
and Casio. "The recruiting 
trip was an absolute blast," 
said Claypool. 

"Coach Van Dyke helps 
everyone and he is really 
cool," added Casio, who was 
so impressed by the trip 
that he came to Clarion 
from his home country of 
Brazil. 




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Call 814.226.7007 

or visit 

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That being said, now that 
the recruiting process is 
over practice has begun get- 
ting under way. Despite 
practices that are more 
time-consuming, challeng- 
ing and demanding, the 
recruits all agree that 
Clarion is the place that 
they want to be. 

"Right now the competi- 
tion is really intense 
amongst ourselves, because 
it's almost time for us to cut 
down our roster," said 
Krieder. "Everyone is push- 
ing hard and the coaches are 
looking to see who's the 
most dedicated." 

Dedication that Ubbink 
said takes a lot of faith and 
determination. 

"The practices include a lot 
more yardage than what we 
were used to in high school 
and it's tough waking up 
early," he said. 

However, despite the 
workload each of the fresh- 
men swimmers is confident 
that they can succeed in 
their strange new environ- 
ment. Key to that confidence 
has been the role of the 
upperclassmen of whom 
each of the recruits were 
quick to give credit to. 

"It's not like high school 
where the freshmen all sit 
in one corner together away 
from everyone else and are 
looked down on for being 
stupid freshmen. The upper- 
classmen treat us great", 
they treat us as if we've 
been a member of the team 
for years," said Krieder. 

With an easier adjustment 
accounted for these "fresh 
fish," all that's left to do is 
live up to the expectations of 
themselves and so far each 
of them appears to have 
accomphshed that mission. 

Each of the members had 
nothing but good things to 
report on their practices 
with many of them express- 
ing that they saw improve- 
ment in themselves from 
one practice to the next. 

"It's early, but I already 
have the feeling that the 
coaches will help us perform 
the best that we can and 
that everyone will continue 
to be very supportive," said 
Krieder. 

But the pool is not the only 
place they are having fun 
this semester. Ralston Hall, 
were each of them lives 
together on the same floor, 
has provided plenty of 
laughs for the elite eight. 

"It's great living together 
because we can offer each 
other encouragement and 
we can hang out all the 
time," said Ubbink. 

"It's been great and I love 
all of them; we include each 
other in everything. It 
always good to meet differ- 
ent people and each person 
has a unique aspect about 
them that I like," said Casio. 
Indeed it appears that this 
year's group is a close-knit 
one, which should bode well 
for the team sport philoso- 
phy instilled in all athletes 
of "there is no I in team." If 
there is one team that prac- 
tices like a team it is cer- 
tainly this one, ultimately 
leaving outstanding poten- 
tial for this season. 

"I think we'll turn heads 
this season," said Claypool. 



Page 12 



llffi CLARION CALL 



S/§rts 



September 15. 2005 



X-C Teams Finish First 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

On Saturday Clarion's 
men's and women's cross 
country teams participated 
in their first match of the 
year. 

The meet, which was held 
at Thiel College, saw each of 
the Golden Eagle teams eas- 
ily bring home first place 
despite missing key team 
members that figure to be 
important later on. 

The men finished first out 
of nine teams in the meet, 
winning by 48 points and 
women finished first out of 
12 teams, winning by 35 
points. 

The top three runners in 
both meets were Golden 
Eagles; Bill Herrmann. 
Sean Williams and Chris 
Clark, who all finished in 
just under 28 minutes for 
the men. 

Erin Richards, Tasha 
Wheatley and Katie Jarzab 
who all finished just over 23 
and a half minutes for the 
women. 

"I was very pleased with 
the teams' performances in 
the meet and I expect the 
success to continue through- 



out the season," said Coach 
Daniel Caulfield. "The times 
are very good for this time of 
year and for the kind of 
course that the meet was 
held on. I believe that at 
this point we will only 
improve even more." 

Although no team leader 
has emerged as of yet. 
Coach Caulfield believes 
that one will emerge at 
some point this season. He 
emphasized that the team 
concept is what is most 
important and that at most 
meets someone different 
usually steps up and leads 
the way. 

This Friday Sept. 16 both 
the men's and women's 
teams will do battle at 
Slippery Rock. 

"The Slippery Rock match 
will be a good indicator for 
the team to see exactly how 
we stack up against some of 
the top teams around," said 
Caulfield. 

"SUppery Rock's men's 
team is expected to be one of 
the top teams in the region 
after some good recruiting 
and their women's team fin- 
ished third at the NCAA 
Regionals last year." 




Photo Courtesy of Erin Richards 

Erin Richards, Tasha Wheatley ar)d Katie Jarzab push ahead 
of the field as they lead the Golden Eagles to first place fin- 
ish over 11 other teams at Staurday;s meet at Theil College. 



CU at Athletic Events 



Cross Country 


Tennis 


Sept. 16 


Sept. 15 


@ Slippery Rock 


@ West Liberty 


Football 


Sept. 17 


Sept. 17 


vs. Bloomsburg 


vs. IVIansfield 




*Family Day* 


Sept. 20 




@ East Stroudsburg 


Golf 




Sept. 18-19 


Volleyball 


Hal Hansen Invite @ 


Sept. 17 


Clarion Oaks 


@ California 


Soccer 


Sept. 20 


Sept. 16 


@ Indiana 


vs. California 




Sept. 19 




vs. Indiana 






Photo Courtesy of Erin Richards 

Bill Herrmar\r), Sean Williams finish strong to give CU the 
top three spots in Saturday's race at Thiel College. 







M Soccer - Sept 13 

Kutztown 2 

Bloomsburg 1 

Lock Haven 2 

East Stroudsburg 1 

West Chester 1 

Millersville 
(OT) 

Slippery Rock 1 

Shippensburg 

W Soccer - Sept 13 

Kutztown 1 

Bloomsburg 

Indiana 5 

California 1 

Lock Haven 1 

Clarion 

West Chester 2 

Millersville 

Philadelphia 3 

East Stroudsburg 

Shippensburg 1 

Slippery Rock 



VoUeyball • Sept 13 
California 3 

Edinboro 



Lock Haven 3 

Indiana 2 

Slippery Rock 3 

Clarion 1 

Kutztown 3 

Cheyney 

Millersville 3 

Shippensbui:g 1 

East Stroudsburg 3 

West Chester 1 

W Soccer -Sept 11 

Bridgeport 2 

Kutztown 

Football - Sept 10 

East Stroudsburg 66 

C.W. Post 49 

California 88 

Mansfield 12 

Bloomsburg 49 

Shippnsburg 21 



West Chester 30 

Indiana 20 

Cheyney 13 

St. Paul's 10 

So. Conn. St. 31 

Kutztown 28 

Delaware St. 38 

Millersville 6 

lowson 70 

Lock Haven 

Shepherd 24 

Slippery Rock 7 

M Soccer - Sept 10 

Bloomsburg 2 

East Stroudsburg 

California i 

Kutztown 

Lock Haven i 

Millersville i 
(20T) 

West Chester 4 

Slippery Rock 1 



Bridgeport 
Shippensburg 

W Soccer - Sept 10 

Bloomsburg 
East Stroudsburg 
(20T) 

West Chester 
Clarion 

Slippery Rock 

Indiana 

(20T) 

Mansfield 
Shippensburg 

Grand Valley St. 
California 

Edinboro 
Lock Haven 

New Haven 
Kutztown 

C.W. Post 
Millersville 



4 







4 
2 

1 




Golden Eagle Volleyball 
Set For 2005 Season 



Chris McKissick and 
Marc Steigerwald 
Clarion Call Staff Writers 

The Clarion University 
Women's volleyball team is 
geared up for the upcoming 
season. 

They are looking to build 
upon last year's record of 29- 
9 and 6-4 in the PSAC west 
and qualifying for the 
NCAA Division II playoffs. 
Head coach Tracey Fluharty 
believes she has "a talented 
but young" team this year. 

The roster consists of three 
seniors, three juniors, nine 
sophomores (two of which 
are currently out with 
injuries) and three fresh- 
men. 

The team is lead by three 
seniors with four years of 
playing experience. The cap- 
tain of the team is Ashley 
Kreiner. She is the setter 
and set a university record 
last year for assists with 
1,679. She was named to the 
Daktronics All-Region team 
and second team PSAC- 
West. 

Senior co-captain Karen 
Stoklosa also joined Kreiner 
on the PSAC West second 
team. She also led the team 
in blocks with 189 last sea- 
son. 

Senior co-captain, Heather 
Byrne is the leader of the 
defense. She had 367 digs 
last season. Junior Jenn 
Sacco also contributed on 
the defensive end with 373 
digs. 



The Lady Eagles were 
picked in the pre-season to 
finish third in the PSAC 
West and they are looking to 
pass that ranking this year. 
Coach Fluharty believes 
they can do it. However, she 
said, "Inconsistency is a 
problem right now and each 
player needs to be responsi- 
ble for their own play." 

The goals for the team 
are, "working on our weak- 
nesses and mistakes and we 
need to take it one game at a 
time," said Fluharty. 

Senior captain Kreiner 

also hopes for a good season 

and learning from her past 

seasons. 

The Lady Eagles are going 



<( 



Inconsistency is a prob- 
lem right now and each 
player needs to be 
responsible ... 

-Coach Fluharty 

to face some good competi- 
tion from Lock Haven, 
California, lUP and an 
improving Slippery Rock. 

Coach Fluharty says, "No 
match will be an easy one." 
The Lady Eagles are cur- 
rently 10-3 on the season. 
Their next match is Sept. 
17 at Cal and their next 
home match is Sept. 27 
against Edinboro. 



Eagle Spikers Down 
Seton Hill; Loses to SRU 



Clarion 
Seton Hill 



3 




Zachery Ramsey 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



The Clarion Eagle volley- 
ball team continued it's win- 
ning ways last Wednesday 
against the Seton Hill, beat- 
ing out the Griffins three 
games to one. 

The Eagle's victory, which 
pushed the team to an 
impressive 10-2 start, fea- 
tured a stand out perform- 
ance from sophomore 
Christina Steiner who led 
the team by tallying 20 kills 
over the match. 

Another sophomore, libero 
Vicky Gentile, set managed 
23 digs to lead the Eagles, 
while senior setter Ashley 
Kreiner stepped up and 
helped the team by setting 
up 48 assists. 

Senior middle hitter 
Karen Stoklosa paced the 
Golden Eagles in blocks 
with four. 

Coach Tracey Fluharty 
attributes her team's strong 
start to the desire shown 
over a very long, intense 
preseason. 

Although the team has 
played well this season, the 
coach still points out that 
there are areas where the 
team needs improvement, 
identifying better player 
communication and more 
consistent play among the 
top ambitions. 

She also notes that going 
into conference play it will 
be important to take each 
PSAC one by one rather 
than looking ahead. 
This season has seen some 



pleasant surprises for the 
Golden Eagles in terms of 
personnel. 

Along with the strong play 
of Steiner, Stoklosa, 
Kreiner, and Gentile, 
Clarion has received solid 
play from sophomore Karen 
Wiefling at outside hitter. 

Junior middle hitter 
Lindsay Banner has also 
made major contributions, 
playing very well after 
recovering from two sepa- 
rate ACL surgeries. 

After piling up 10 wins 
against non-PSAC oppo- 
nents, Clarion heads into 
conference play with a good 
amount of steam. 



Slippery Rock 
Clarion 



3 
1 



Josh Woods 
Sports Editor 



The Slippery Rock volley- 
ball team handed Clarion 
just its third loss of the sea- 
son last night in the PSAC 
opener for both teams in 
Tippin Gymnasium. 

Sarah Fries and Lindsay 
Banner each had a good 
night for the Golden Eagles 
with 13 and 12 kills respec- 
tively despite the loss. 

Defensively, Vicky Gentile, 
(27 digs) and Christina 
Stiner (17 digs, 2 blocks) 
pitched in to keep things 
close. 

However, The Rock were 
just too much for the Golden 
Eagles winning three of four 
games by scores of 30-25, 
30-28 and a 30-18 decisive 
blow. 

The Golden Eagles will be 
back in action Saturday at 1 
p.m. when they travel to 
take on California. 



Tobeco 

open mic 

One copy free 



Features 




Washingtoii kicks of S 
MLK serieSf page 7 




101 CALL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 



^ 



Volume 91 Issue 3 September 22, 2005 




. Nation^t 



Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

Calif, cracks down on 
slave rings 

SACRAMENTO, Calif — 
Gov. Schwarzenegger 
approved legislation 

Wednesday intended to 
crack down on slave rings 
that force people — often 
poor and illegal immi- 
grants — to perform 
debasing work in sweat- 
shops, construction and 
prostitution. 

The legislation estab- 
lishes a felony of human 
trafficking. Although law 
enforcement has been 
able to prosecute many of 
those crimes under exist- 
ing state and federal laws, 
including kidnapping and 
pimping, advocates said 
the new law would help 
convict those who use psy- 
chological coercion. 

Dynamic NOW president 
Molly Yard dies at 93 

WASHINGTON-Molly 
Yard, a former president 
of the National 

Organization for Women 
who fought for the Equal 
Rights Amendment, legal 
access to contraception 
and abortions and revital- 
ization of the feminist 
movement, died Sept. 21 
at Fair Oaks Nursing 
Home in Pittsburgh, 
where she lived. She was 
93. 

Grand Jury in Pa. says 
church hid sex abuse 
WASHINGTON— After a 
three-year investigation, 
a grand jury in 
Philadelphia reported 
Wednesday that Roman 
Catholic Cardinals John 
Krol and Anthony 
Bevilacqua deliberately 
concealed the sexual 
abuse of hundreds of chil- 
dren. The grand jury also 
found that the 

Philadelphia Archdiocese 
kept 10 accused child 
molesters in active min- 
istry after all the U.S. 
bishops promised to 
remove any priest who 
had ever faced a credible 
allegation of abuse. 

Ford hybrid initiative 
WASHINGTON— Ford 
Motor Co. jumped on the 
hybrid-car bandwagon 
Wednesday with a prom- 
ise to boost production 
tenfold to 250,000 cars 
and trucks per year by 
2010, a decision that 
moves hybrids closer to 
the mainstream of the 
U.S. auto market. 

Hybrids will represent 
about 4 percent of the 
company's global sales, 
but the decision could 
deliver a windfall of 
"green PR." 

Rap music company 
bookeepii^ violations 
NEW YORK — The book- 
keeper for rap music com- 
pany Murder Inc. pleaded 
guilty Wednesday to fed- 
eral charges she violated 
cash transaction laws but 
denied knowing the 
money came from any ille- 
gal sources, as alleged. 



RSOs combine Katrina relief efforts 



Jeffry Richards 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJprichards@clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Sept. 21 - In the 
aftermath of hurricane 
Katrina, a meeting was held 
on Sept. 15 in the Gemmell 
Multi-Purpose Room in 
order to try and organize the 
different groups together to 
form a campus-wide 
Katrina fund, named 
Operation Clarion Cares. 

Cody Ressel, vice presi- 
dent of student senate, and 
Jessica Bayer, special 
events chair for the 
University Activities Board, 
are co-chairs of the relief 
efforts. The main goal of 
Operation Clarion Cares is 
to bring all of the different 
organizations on campus 
together in order to hopeful- 
ly create one large campus 
fund for the victims of 
Katrina. 

"We want to do something 
all of Clarion can get 
behind. A lot of times you 
see organizations doing 



things," said Ressel during 
his and Bayer's presenta- 
tion to the leaders of all of 
the groups. He said, "We are 
trying to cut the red tape." 

There will be a campus- 
wide vigil to honor the vic- 
tims of the hurricane 
Wednesday, Sept. 8 begin- 
ning at 6:30 p.m. at the Bell 
Tower. The vigil will include 
placing a wreath in 
Gemmell Park, remarks by 
university faculty affected 
by the hurricane and a Red 
Cross volunteer who has 
just returned from the 
effected area, and a per- 
formance by the Lift Every 
Voice Gospel Choir. 

Also, Phi Delta Theta will 
be sponsoring a fashion 
show in conjunction with 
Crooks Clothing on Sept. 28 
at 8 p.m. in the Gemmell 
MPR. Crooks Clothing will 
double all donations at the 
event, up to $1,000. 

Through this relief organ- 
ization, Bayer and Ressel 
are hoping to make it easier 

See CLARION CARES, page 2 




Jacqueline L. Salmon / Los Angtles Times ■ Washington Post News Service 

Katrina Volunteer - Red Cross volunteer Roger Guyette hands a meal of beans and macaroni 
and cheese to hurricane victim Lloyd Richard, 13, near his home in Des Allemandes, La. 
Guyette became a Red Cross volunteer after the group came to his aid following a fire that 
destroyed his Manassas, Va., house five years ago. 



Saturday Service planned for September 24 




Preiiminary 
iiearing lieid 

The Clarion News named in 
civil case over alleged libel 



Melody Simpson 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_mrslmpson@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 21 - On 
Saturday, Sept. 24, Clarion 
University's Community 
Service-Learning Office and 
the United Way of Clarion 
County will be teaming up 
to help the community by 
combining the 21st 
Saturday Service Day with 
the annual Day of Caring. 

The major sponsors for the 
day's events are Columbia 
Gas of Pennsylvania, 
Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, United Way 
of Clarion County and 
Adelphia Communications. 

Over 200 volunteers will 
be gathering at 18 sites that 
are located throughout 
Clarion, Jefferson and 
Venango counties. A few of 
the projects to be completed 
include: working with men- 



tally-challenged children 
and aduJi;!,. helping the Girl 
Scouts, renovating a local 
park and building a haunted 
barn. 

With such a variety of 
sites, there should be some- 
thing to interest everyone. 
Not only will the volunteers 
be working, but having fun 
as well. 

Door prizes will be provid- 
ed by the following business 
sponsors: Captain Loomis, 
Clarion Microtel, County 
Seat Restaurant, Cozumel's 
Restaurant, Dairy Queen, 
Dan Smith Candies, Eat N 
Park, Flowers and Bows, 
Kentucky Fried Chicken, 
McDonald's, Northwest 
Savings Bank, Papa John's, 
Pizza Pub, Quality Inn, 
Sage Meadows, Staples, 
Wal-Mart, Wendy's and 
Wellness Health Options. 

Registrations are still 
being accepted. 



"We have over 200 volun- 
teers who are really excited. 
This is our first collabora- 
tion with United Way, and 
we are pleased to have so 



« 



This is our first 
collaboration with 
United Way, and we 
are pleased to have 
so many students 
who are willing to 
give a day to help. 

- Diana Brush 



many students who are will- 
ing to give a day to help in 
the community," said Diana 
Brush, director of 

Community Service- 

Learning. 



John Santa 
News Editor 

sJmsanta@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 21 - On 
Sept. 13, the Court of 
Common Pleas of Clarion 
County, presided over by the 
Hon. James G. Arner, com- 
menced its preliminary civil 
proceeding into the case of 
Glenn M. Bobak vs. Western 
Pennsylvania Newspaper 
Company NO. 1333 CD 
2004. 

The plaintiff, Bobak, who 
is represented by Dom 
Greco of the Law offices of 
Greco and Lander, PC, is 
taking action against the 
Western Pennsylvania 

Newspaper Company due to 
an article, which was pub- 
lished on June 15, 2004. 
The article was written by 
Rodney L. Sherman, News 
Editor of ''The Clarion 
News." The contents of the 
article, according to the 
complaints filed by Bobak 
and his counsel, defamed 



Bobak and his 

Newmansville, Pa. estab- 
lishment. 

The aforementioned com- 
plaints filed by Bobak and 
Greco and Lander, PC, con- 
sist of 8 counts of action 
stemming from the publica- 
tion of "The Clarion News" 
article both in print and on 
the Internet. 

Of the eight counts, two 
counts, defamation and civil 
conspiracy to defame, per- 
tain to the newspaper publi- 
cation of the article. The 
other six counts are in 
regards to the Internet pub- 
lication. Those counts 
include defamation, civil 
conspiracy to defame, inter- 
ference with existing rela- 
tionships, civil conspiracy to 
interfere with existing rela- 
tionships, interference with 
prospective relationships 
and civil conspiracy to inter- 
fere with prospective rela- 
tionships. 

The civil proceeding 
See UBEL CASE, pagt 2 



Suspect in robberies to be cliarged 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_bel<oebler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 21-Clarion 
resident Christopher Daniel 
Sebring-Zoll, 19, who was 
the suspect of three rob- 
beries, allegedly surren- 
dered to authorities on Sept. 
16. 

According to Clarion 
County Borough Police 
Chief Mark Hall, the K-9 
and officers were tracking 
him when he became tired 
and gave up. 

Sebring-Zoll allegedly 
admitted to at least one inci- 
dent concerning two stolen 
purses that occurred on 
Sept. 3. These happenings 
took place at Merle Road 
and Center Place. 

Sebring-Zoll was consid- 
ered a suspect after Joshua 
Barnes and Jenna Fair went 
to police with information 
relative to the recent events. 
Allegedly. Fair told police 



that Sebring-Zoll confronted 
them in Uni-mart about 
buying a truck from Barnes. 
Barnes then told Sebring- 
Zoll that he was asking 
$1,500 for the truck and 
Sebring-Zoll offered him 
$1000 in cash, which he 
then showed them. 

Sebring-Zoll told Barnes 
he would contact him about 
the truck. 

Fair and Barnes allegedly 
visited Sebring-ZoU's apart- 
ment on South Avenue, on 
Sept. 8. At the apartment, 
Fair noticed a cream-colored 
Guess purse and then sup- 
posedly asked Sebring- ZoU 
about the purse, Sebring- 
Zoll then gave Fair the 
purse. 

Fair told police she later 
wondered if there wa " a con- 
nection with the purse to 
the crimes, then contacted 
police. 

Police had already inter- 
viewed a victim that said 
her cream-colored Guess 



purse had been stolen. A 
Louis Vuitton purse valued 
at $500 had also been stolen 
from a second victim. 

According "The Clarion 
News" in a story published 
Sept. 20, "Sebring-Zoll is 
charged with robbery, a 
first-degree felony, theft by 
unlawful taking, a second- 
degree felony offense, theft 
by unlawful taking, a sec- 
ond-degree misdemeanor, 
simple assault, receiving 
stolen property, both second- 
degree misdemeanors, and 
harassment, a summary 
offense, in connection with 
these two incidents." 

Sebring-Zoll is being held 
on $150,000 cash bond, and 
according to Hall, he is 
being held in the Clarion 
County Jail. 

"I feel a lot safer, knowing 
that he has been caught and 
I don't have to worry about 
whether he is still on the 
streets or not," said sopho- 
more Katie Spohn. 



mmmm 



Page 12 



THE CLARION CALL 



Se ptember 15. 2005 



S/itts 

X-C Teams Finish First 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

On Saturday Clarion's 
men's and women's cross 
country teams participated 
in their first match of the 
year. 

The meet, which was held 
at Thiel College, saw each of 
the Golden Eagle teams eas- 
ily bring home first place 
despite missing key team 
members that figure to be 
important later on. 

The men finished first out 
of nine teams in the meet, 
winning by 48 points and 
women finished first out of 
12 teams, winning by 35 
points. 

The top three runners in 
both meets were Golden 
Eagles; Bill Herrmann, 
Sean Williams and Chris 
Clark, who all finished in 
just under 28 minutes for 
the men. 

Erin Richards, Tasha 
Wheatley and Katie Jarzab 
who all finished just over 23 
and a half minutes for the 
women. 

"I was very pleased with 
the teams' performances in 
the meet and I expect the 
success to continue through- 



out the season," said Coach 
Daniel Caulfield. "The times 
are very good for this time of 
year and for the kind of 
course that the meet was 
held on. I believe that at 
this point we will only 
improve even more." 

Although no team leader 
has emerged as of yet. 
Coach Caulfield believes 
that one will emerge at 
some point this season. He 
emphasized that the team 
concept is what is most 
important and that at most 
meets someone different 
usually steps up and leads 
the way. 

This Friday, Sept. 16 both 
the men's and women's 
teams will do battle at 
Slippery Rock. 

"The Slippery Rock match 
will be a good indicator for 
the team to see exactly how 
we stack up against some of 
the top teams around," said 
Caulfield. 

"Slippery Rock's men's 
team is expected to be one of 
the top teams in the region 
after some good recruiting 
and their women's team fin- 
ished third at the NCAA 
Regionals last year." 




Photo Courtesy of Erin Richards 

Erin Richards, Tasha Wheatley ar)d Katie Jarzab push ahead 
of the field as they lead the Golden Eagles to first place fin- 
ish over 11 other teams at Staurday;s meet at Theil College. 



CU at Athletic Events 



Cross Country 


Tennis 


Sept. 16 


Sept. 15 


@ Slippery Rock 


@ West Liberty 


Football 


Sept. 17 


Sept. 17 


vs. Bloomsburg 


vs. Mansfield 




*Family Day* 


Sept. 20 




@ East Stroudsburg 


Golf 




Sept. 18-19 


Volleyball 


Hal Hansen Invite @ 


Sept. 17 


Clarion Oaks 


@ California 


Soccer 


Sept. 20 


Sept. 16 


@ Indiana 


vs. California 




Sept. 19 




vs. Indiana 






Photo Courtesy of Erin Richards 

Bill Herrmanr), ^ar) Williams finish strong to give CU the 
top three spots in Saturday's race at Thiel College. 




r^oi 



M Soccer - Sept 13 

Kutztown 2 

Bloomsburg 1 

Lock Haven 2 

East Stroudsburg 1 

West Chester 1 

Millersville 
(OT) 

Slippery Rock 1 

Shippensburg 

W Soccer ■ Sept 13 

Kutztown 1 

Bloomsburg 

Indiana 5 

California 1 

Lock Haven 1 

Clarion 

West Chester 2 

Millersville 

Philadelphia 3 

East Stroudsburg 

Shippensburg 1 

Slippery Rock 



Volleyball - Sept 13 

California 3 

Edinboro 

Lock Haven 3 

Indiana 2 

Slippery Rock 3 

ClarioD 1 

Kutztown 3 

Cheyney 

Millersville 3 

Shippensburg 1 

East Stroudsburg 3 

West Chester 1 



W Soccer - Sept 11 

Bridgeport 2 

Kutztown 



Football ■ Sept 10 

East Stroudsburg 66 

C.W. Post 49 

California 88 

Mansfield 12 

Bloomsburg 49 

Shippnsburg 21 



West Chester 30 

Indiana 20 

Cheyney 13 

St. Paul's 10 

So. Conn. St. 31 

Kutztown 28 

Delaware St. 38 

Millersville 6 

Towson 70 

Lock Haven 

Shepherd 24 

Slippery Rock 7 

M Soccer - Sept 10 

Bloomsburg 2 

East Stroudsburg 

California 1 

Kutztown 

Lock Haven 1 

Millersville l 
(20T) 

West Chester 4 

Slippery Rock l 



Bridgeport 
Shippensburg 

W Soccer - Sept 10 

Bloomsburg 
East Stroudsburg 
(20T) 

West Chester 
Clarion 

Slippery Rock 

Indiana 

(20T) 

Mansfield 
Shippensburg 

Grand Valley St. 
California 

Edinboro 
Lock Haven 

New Haven 
Kutztown 

C.W. Post 
Millersville 



4 











Golden Eagle Volleyball 
Set For 2005 Season 



Chris McKissick and 
Marc Steigerwald 
Clarion Call Staff Writers 

The Clarion University 
Women's volleyball team is 
geared up for the upcoming 
season. 

They are looking to build 
upon last year's record of 29- 
9 and 64 in the PSAC west 
and qualifying for the 
NCAA Division II playoffs. 
Head coach Tracey Fluharty 
believes she has "a talented 
but young" team this year. 
The roster consists of three 
seniors, three juniors, nine 
sophomores (two of which 
are currently out with 
injuries) and three fresh- 
men. 

The team is lead by three 
seniors with four years of 
playing experience. The cap- 
tain of the team is Ashley 
Kreiner. She is the setter 
and set a university record 
last year for assists with 
1,679. She was named to the 
Daktronics All-Region team 
and second team PSAC- 
West. 

Senior co-captain Karen 
Stoklosa also joined Kreiner 
on the PSAC West second 
team. She also led the team 
in blocks with 189 last sea- 
son. 

Senior co-captain, Heather 
Byrne is the leader of the 
defense. She had 367 digs 
last season. Junior Jenn 
Sacco also contributed on 
the defensive end with 373 
digs. 



The Lady Eagles were 
picked in the pre-season to 
finish third in the PSAC 
West and they are looking to 
pass that ranking this year. 
Coach Fluharty believes 
they can do it. However, she 
said, "Inconsistency is a 
problem right now and each 
player needs to be responsi- 
ble for their own play." 

The goals for the team 
are, "working on our weak- 
nesses and mistakes and we 
need to take it one game at a 
time," said Fluharty. 

Senior captain Kreiner 

also hopes for a good season 

and learning from her past 

seasons. 

The Lady Eagles are going 



(( 



Inconsistency is a prob- 
lem right now and each 
player needs to be 
responsible ... 

-Coach Fluharty 

to face some good competi- 
tion from Lock Haven, 
California, lUP and an 
improving Slippery Rock. 

Coach Fluharty says, "No 
match will be an easy one." 
The Lady Eagles are cur- 
rently 10-3 on the season. 
Their next match is Sept. 
17 at Cal and their next 
home match is Sept. 27 
against Edinboro. 



Eagle Spii<ers Down 
Seton Hill; Loses to SRU 



Clarion 
Seton Hill 



3 




Zachery Ramsey 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



The Clarion Eagle volley- 
ball team continued it's win- 
ning ways last Wednesday 
against the Seton Hill, beat- 
ing out the Griffins three 
games to one. 

The Eagle's victory, which 
pushed the team to an 
impressive 10-2 start, fea- 
tured a stand out perform- 
ance from sophomore 
Christina Steiner who led 
the team by tallying 20 kills 
over the match. 

Another sophomore, libero 
Vicky Gentile, set managed 
23 digs to lead the Eagles, 
while senior setter Ashley 
Kreiner stepped up and 
helped the team by setting 
up 48 assists. 

Senior middle hitter 
Karen Stoklosa paced the 
Golden Eagles in blocks 
with four. 

Coach Tracey Fluharty 
attributes her team's strong 
start to the desire shown 
over a very long, intense 
preseason. 

Although the team has 
played well this season, the 
coach still points out that 
there are areas where the 
team needs improvement, 
identifying better player 
communication and more 
consistent play among the 
top ambitions. 

She also notes that going 
into conference play it will 
be important to take each 
PSAC one by one rather 
than looking ahead. 

This season has seen some 



pleasant surprises for the 
Golden Eagles in terms of 
personnel. 

Along with the strong play 
of Steiner, Stoklosa, 
Kreiner, and Gentile, 
Clarion has received solid 
play from sophomore Karen 
Wiefling at outside hitter. 

Junior middle hitter 
Lindsay Banner has also 
made major contributions, 
playing very well after 
recovering from two sepa- 
rate ACL surgeries. 

After piling up 10 wins 
against non-PSAC oppo- 
nents. Clarion heads into 
conference play with a good 
amount of steam. 



Slippery Rock 
Clarion 



3 
1 



Josh Woods 
Sports Editor 



The Slippery Rock volley- 
ball team handed Clarion 
just its third loss of the sea- 
son last night in the PSAC 
opener for both teams in 
Tippin Gymnasium. 

Sarah Fries and Lindsay 
Banner each had a good 
night for the Golden Eagles 
with 13 and 12 kills respec- 
tively, despite the loss. 

Defensively, Vicky Gentile, 
(27 digs) and Christina 
Stiner (17 digs, 2 blocks) 
pitched in to keep things 
close. 

However, The Rock were 
just too much for the Golden 
Eagles winning three of four 
games by scores of 30-25, 
30-28 and a 30-18 decisive 
blow. 

The Golden Eagles will be 
back in action Saturday at 1 
p.m. when they travel to 
take on California. 



I 



I 



■ 

I 






^^i^tmmmmimmm^mm 



Tobeco 

open tnic 

One copy free 




Washuigton kicks off I Jp 
MLK series, page 7 ^M^ 



NCALL 



^ 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 



Volume 91 Issue 3 September 22, 2005 




^^p^mT RSOs combine Katrina relief efforts 



Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

Calil. cracks down on 
slave rings '^HH 

SACRAMENTO, CaliF^ 
Gov. Schwarzenegger 
approved legislation 

Wednesday intended to 
crack down on slave rings 
that force people — often 
poor and illegal immi- 
grants — to perform 
debasing work in sweat- 
shops, construction and 
prostitution. 

The legislation estab- 
lishes a felony of human 
trafficking. Although law 
enforcement has been 
able to prosecute many of 
those crimes under exist- 
ing state and federal laws, 
including kidnapping and 
pimping, advocates said 
the new law would help 
convict those who use psy- 
chological coercion. 



Dynamic NOW president 
Molly Yard dies at 93 
WASHINGTON-Molly 
Yard, a former president 
of the National 

Organization for Women 
who fought for the Equal 
Rights Amendment, legal 
access to contraception 
and abortions ana revitar 
ization of the feminist 
movement, died Sept. 21 
at Fair Oaks Nursing 
Home in Pittsburgh, 
where she lived. She was 
93. 

Grand Jury in Pa. says 
church hid sex abuse 
WASHINGTON— After a 
three-year investigation, 
a grand jury in 
Philadelphia reported 
Wednesday that Roman 
Catholic Cardinals John 
Krol and Anthony 
Bevilacqua deliberately 
concealed the sexual 
abuse of hundreds of chil- 
dren. The grand jury also 
found that the 

Philadelphia Archdiocese 
kept 10 accused child 
molesters in active min- 
istry after all the U.S. 
bishops promised to 
remove any priest who 
had ever faced a credible 
allegation of abuse. 

Ford hybrid initiative 
WASHINGTON— Ford 
Motor Co. jumped on the 
hybrid-car bandwagon 
Wednesday with a prom- 
ise to boost production 
tenfold to 250,000 cars 
and trucks per year by 
2010, a decision that 
moves hybrids closer to 
the mainstream of the 
U.S. auto market. 

Hybrids will represent 
about 4 percent of the 
company's global sales, 
but the decision could 
deliver a windfall of 
^ green PR." 

Rap music company 
bookeeping violations 
NEW YORK — The book- 
keeper for rap music com- 
pany Murder Inc. pleaded 
guilty Wednesday to fed- 
eral charges she violated 
cash transaction laws but 
denied knowing the 
money came from any ille- 
gal sources, as alleged. 



Jeffry Richards 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjprichards@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 21 -In the 
aftermath of hurricane 
Katrina, a meeting was held 
on Sept. 15 in the Gemmell 
Multi-purpose Room in 
order to try and organize the 
different groups together to 
form a campus-wide 
Katrina fund, named 
Operation Clarion Cares. 

Cody Ressel, vice presi- 
dent of student senate, and 
Jessica Bayer, special 
events chair for the 
University Activities Board, 
are co-chairs of the relief 
efforts. The main goal of 
Operation Clarion Cares is 
to bring all of the different 
organizations on campus 
together in order to hopeful- 
ly create one large campus 
fund for the victims of 
Katrina. 

"We want to do something 
all of Clarion can get 
behind. A lot of times you 
see organizations doing 



things," said Ressel during 
his and Bayer's presenta- 
tion to the leaders of all of 
the groups. He said, "We are 
trying to cut the red tape." 

There will be a campus- 
wide vigil to honor the vic- 
tims of the hurricane 
Wednesday, Sept. 8 begin- 
ning at 6:30 p.m. at the Bell 
Tower. The vigil will include 
placing a wreath in 
Gemmell Park, remarks by 
university faculty affected 
by the hurricane and a Red 
Cross volunteer who has 
just returned from the 
effected area, and a per- 
formance by the Lift Every 
Voice Gospel Choir. 

Also, Phi Delta Theta will 
be sponsoring a fi'shion 
show in conjunction with 
Crooks Clothing on Sept. 28 
at 8 p.m. in the Gemmell 
MPR. Crooks Clothing will 
double all donations at the 
event, up to $1,000. 

Through this relief organ- 
ization, Bayer and Ressel 
are hoping to make it easier 

See CLARION CARES, pag9 2 




Jacqueline L. Salmon / Los Angeles Times ■ Washington Post News Service 

Katrina Volunteer - Red Cross volunteer Roger Guyette hands a meal of beans and macaroni 
and cheese to hurricane victim Lloyd Richard, 13, near his home in Des Allemandes, La. 
Guyette became a Red Cross volunteer after the group came to his aid follov/ing a fire that 
destroyed his Manassas, Va., house five years ago. 



Saturday Service planned for September 24 




Courtesy of Community Service-Learning Office 

Saturday Service- A volunteer works during last year's event. 



Preliminary 
iiearlng lield 

The Clarion News named in 
civil case over aileged libei 



Melody Simpson 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_mrsimpson@clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Sept. 21 - On 
Saturday, Sept. 24, Clarion 
University's Community 
Service-Learning Office and 
the United Way of Clarion 
County will be teaming up 
to help the community by 
combining the 21st 
Saturday Service Day with 
the annual Day of Caring. 

The major sponsors for the 
day's events are Columbia 
Gas of Pennsylvania, 
Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, United Way 
of Clarion County and 
Adelphia Communications. 

Over 200 volunteers will 
be gathering at 18 sites that 
are located throughout 
Clarion, Jefferson and 
Venango counties. A few of 
the projects to be completed 
include^ working with men- 



tally-challenged children 
and adultf ,, helping the Girl 
Scouts, renovating a local 
park and building a haunted 
barn. 

With such a variety of 
sites, there should be some- 
thing to interest everyone. 
Not only will the volunteers 
be working, but having fun 
as well. 

Door prizes will be provid- 
ed by the following business 
sponsors^ Captain Loomis, 
Clarion Microtel, County 
Seat Restaurant, Cozumel's 
Restaurant, Dairy Queen, 
Dan Smith Candies, Eat N 
Park, Flowers and Bows, 
Kentucky Fried Chicken, 
McDonald's, Northwest 
Savings Bank, Papa John's, 
Pizza Pub, Quality Inn, 
Sage Meadows, Staples, 
Wal-Mart, Wendy's and 
Wellness Health Options. 

Registrations are still 
being accepted. 



"We have over 200 volun- 
teers who are really excited. 
This is our first collabora- 
tion with United Way, and 
we are pleased to have so 



(( 



This is our first 
collaboration with 
United Way, and we 
are pleased to have 
so many students 
who are willing to 
give a day to help. 

- Diana Brush 



many students who are will- 
ing to give a day to help in 
the community," said Diana 
Brush, director of 

Community Service- 

Learning. 



John Santa 
News Editor 

sjmsanta@clanon.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 21 - On 
Sept. 13, the Court of 
Common Pleas of Clarion 
County, presided over by the 
Hon. James G. Arner, com- 
menced its preliminary civil 
proceeding into the case of 
Glenn M. Bobak vs. Western 
Pennsylvania Newspaper 
Company NO. 1333 CD 
2004. 

The plaintiff, Bobak, who 
is represented by Dom 
Greco of the Law offices of 
Greco and Lander, PC, is 
taking action against the 
Western Pennsylvania 

Newspaper Company due to 
an article, which was pub- 
lished on June 15, 2004. 
The article was written by 
Rodney L. Sherman, News 
Editor of "The Clarion 
News." The contents of the 
article, according to the 
complaints filed by Bobak 
and his counsel, defamed 



Bobak and his 

Newmansville, Pa. estab- 
lishment. 

The aforementioned com- 
plaints filed by Bobak and 
Greco and Lander, PC, con- 
sist of 8 counts of action 
stemming from the publica- 
tion of "The Clarion News" 
article both in print and on 
the Internet. 

Of the eight counts, two 
counts, defamation and civil 
conspiracy to defame, per- 
tain to the newspaper publi- 
cation of the article. The 
other six counts are in 
regards to the Internet pub- 
lication. Those counts 
include defamation, civil 
conspiracy to defame, inter- 
ference with existing rela- 
tionships, civil conspiracy to 
interfere with existing rela- 
tionships, interference with 
prospective relationships 
and civil conspiracy to inter- 
fere with prospective rela- 
tionships. 

The civil proceeding 
360 UBEL CASE, page 2 



Suspect in robberies to be charged 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_bekoebler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 21-Clarion 
resident Christopher Daniel 
Sebring-ZoU, 19, who was 
the suspect of three rob- 
beries, allegedly surren- 
dered to authorities on Sept. 
16. 

According to Clarion 
County Borough Police 
Chief Mark Hall, the K-9 
and officers were tracking 
him when he became tired 
and gave up. 

Sebring-Zoll allegedly 
admitted to at least one inci- 
dent concerning two stolen 
purses that occurred on 
Sept. 3. These happenings 
took place at Merle Road 
and Center Place. 

Sebring-Zoll was consid- 
ered a suspect after Joshua 
Barnes and Jenna Fair went 
to police with information 
relative to the recent events. 
Allegedly. Fair told police 



that Sebring-Zoll confronted 
them in Uni-mart about 
buying a truck from Barnes. 
Barnes then told Sebring- 
Zoll that he was asking 
$1,500 for the truck and 
Sebring-Zoll offered him 
$1000 in cash, which he 
then showed them. 

Sebring-Zoll told Barnes 
he would contact him about 
the truck. 

Fair and Barnes allegedly 
visited Sebring-Zoll's apart- 
ment on South Avenue, on 
Sept. 8. At the apartment, 
Fair noticed a cream-colored 
Guess purse and then sup- 
posedly asked Sebring- ZoU 
about the purse. Sebring- 
Zoll then gave Fair the 
purse. 

Fair told police she later 
wondered if there wa ^ a con- 
nection with the purse to 
the crimes, then contacted 
police. 

Police had already inter- 
viewed a victim that said 
her cream-colored Guess 



purse had been stolen. A 
Louis Vuitton purse valued 
at $500 had also been stolen 
from a second victim. 

According "The Clarion 
News" in a story published 
Sept. 20, "Sebring-Zoll is 
charged with robbery, a 
first-degree felony, theft by 
unlawful taking, a second- 
degree felony offense, theft 
by unlawful taking, a sec- 
ond-degree misdemeanor, 
simple assault, receiving 
stolen property, both second- 
degree misdemeanors, and 
harassment, a summary 
offense, in connection with 
these two incidents." 

Sebring-Zoll is being held 
on $150,000 cash bond, and 
according to Hall, he is 
being held in the Clarion 
County Jail. 

"I feel a lot safer, knowing 
that he has been caught and 
I don't have to worry about 
whether he is still on the 
streets or not," said sopho- 
more Katie Spohn. 



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September 22. 2005 



Clarion PRSSA makes national connections 



Lindsay Grystar 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_llgrystar@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 20 - The 
Public Relations Student 
Society of America (PRSSA) 
will travel to the national 
conference in Miami on Oct. 
21-25, where students will 
get a chance to meet with 
professionals in the public 
relations field. 

This year's key speaker for 
the conference is Kathleen 
Larey Lewton, senior vice 
president of Waggener 
Edstrom, one of the largest 
public relations firms in the 
world. Her background is 
extensive, and students will 
get to learn about her expe- 
riences and receive valuable 
advice from a distinguished 
professional. 

Students who attend the 
conference in Miami will get 
the chance to participate in 



all kinds of seminars, from 
teaching students how to 
run successful chapters in 
their own universities, to 
seminars on fundraising. 
Students also interact with 
professionals while meeting 
other student members of 
PRSSA chapters at other 
universities. 

"PRSSA is a professional 
connection from students to 
professionals," said Dr. 
Lingwall, faculty advisor of 
PRSSA's chapter at Clarion. 
PRSSA is a student run 
public relations society, and 
is open to students of all 
majors Clarion's chapter 
was founded January 2005. 
Each chapter of PRSSA 
elects its own student presi- 
dent, vice president, secre- 
tary and treasurer. 

"We hope the juniors step 
up to fill the leadership posi- 
tions. It is your organiza- 
tion, I am just the advisor," 
said Lingwall. 



Students pay dues to be a 
part of the national society, 
and a small amount of their 
dues goes towards local fees. 
The estimated total of dues 
for this year is $55. 




r 



Dr. Andrew Lingwall 

PRSSA participates in 
many other events rather 
than just the convention, 
including a upcoming dis- 
cussion in Pittsburgh. 

The Public Relations 
Society of America (PRSA) 
Pittsburgh chapter will be 
hosting three national 
experts to discuss PR ethics 



on Sept. 29 at Point Park 
University. All Clarion stu- 
dents, regardless of major, 
are invited to this open dis- 
cussions event. The event 
will discuss the rapid 
change in today's communi- 
cations environment 
through a lunchtime panel 
discussion. Students will get 
the chance to interact with 
three national experts, and 
will have plenty of opportu- 
nities to ask questions. 

In 1968, PRSA founded the 
Public Relations Student 
Society of America. The pur- 
pose of PRSSA is to estab- 
lish a relationship between 
students and professionals 
in the public relations field. 
Today the PRSSA has more 
than 248 chapters in col- 
leges across the country. 

Every year PRSSA and its 
sponsors give away nearly 
$20,000 through a variety of 
scholarship awards offered 
to student members. 



"CLARION CARES " from front 
page 

for the diffrent groups to 
raise funds for Katrina. The 
co-chairs hope to bring the 
different organizations, 
especially smaller ones, 
together to hopefully raise 
more money. The goal for 
the end of this semester is 
$10,000. 

Some other ideas consid- 
ered include donation jars 
around campus, candy sales 
at various events and a 
tuition raffle, which is a 
"work in progress" that 
would allow a student to 
win a semester's tuition if 
their name is drawn. 

Not all of the organiza- 
tions were as optimistic 
towards Operation Clarion 
Cares, though. Jess Spehar 
and Jeff Devine of the 
Student Health Advisory 
Board were disappointed in 
the turn-out at the meeting, 
but agreed that the meeting 
was beneficial and that it is 
great to try and get the cam- 
pus to pull together. "Once 
we start getting the commu- 
nity and students involved 
it will work," said Devine. 

Ressel and Bayer said the 
main delay was due to the 
possibility of Clarion receiv- 
ing evacuees, which would 
have been the first priority, 
but that is no longer hap- 
pening. 

"Instead of everyone doing 
a good job, as a whole, we 
are going to do a great job," 
Ressel said. 

"LIBEL CASE" from front 
page 

consisted of preliminary 
objections by the defen- 
dant's counsel to the com- 
plaint made against the 
Western Newspaper 

Company after which 
Bobak's counsel was afford- 
ed the opportunity to defend 
its complaint. 

The next process argued 
was after defendant's coun- 
sel, Rich Lanzillo of Knox 
McLaughlin Gornall and 
Sennett, PC, respectfully 
moved the court for a protec- 
tive order. Both counsels 
were afforded the opportuni- 
ty to discuss the merits of 
the proposed motion. 

Judge Arner called the 
proceedings to a close, with 
no judgment on any of the 
elements of the case. 

Greco, attorney for the 
plaintiff, was reached for 
comment but decUned: 
Lanzillo, attorney to the 
plaintiff, could not be 
reached for comment at 
press time. 



Franchino new director of university art gaiiery 



Katie Fischer 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kcfischer@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 19 - The 
University Art Gallery at 
the Rena M. Carlson 
Library recently welcomed a 
fresh face to its staff. Mark 
Franchino began Aug. 20 as 
the gallery's new director. 

Franchino obtained the 
position when the university 
did a nationwide search in 
order to fill the position. 
Even though many applied, 
Franchino was the one to 
walk away with the job. 

As the art director at the 
University Gallery, 

Franchino will be in charge 
of all the exhibitions. His 
many responsibilities 

include curating exhibi- 
tions, organizing student 
exhibitions and dealing with 
the permanent art collec- 
tions. While he's just get- 
ting settled in now, 
Franchino does have things 
in mind for the art gallery's 
upcoming years. 

"Right now I am trying 
to settle in first before I 
make any changes," said 
Franchino, "Next semester I 
will be able to start plan- 
ning for the future." 

Aside from the responsibil- 
ities to the gallery, 



Franchino will also be 
teaching several art classes 
in Marwick-Boyd. He is set 
to teach Visual Arts and all 
levels of Printmaking. 

Franchino has a 
Bachelors of Fine Art and 
Masters of Fine Art, from 
State University of New" 
York at Buffalo and the 



ents who exposed me to 
a wide range of experi- 
ences including the arts." 
Franchino said. "As far 
back as I can remember I 
enjoyed creating objects 
and images." 

After receiving his 
degrees, Franchino acquired 
a job with the Plains Art 





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Jonathan Donelll/T/ie Clarion Call 

New Director shows new exhibit - Mark Franchino displays 
the new art exhibit by Lisa Sheirer at the Clarion University 
art gallery Sheirer's exhibit will be on display until Sept. 30 



University of Delaware 
respectively. He has long 
had an affection for art, 
remembering it as being key 
in his life when he was still 
a child growing up in Long 
Island, N.Y. 

"Growing up I was 
lucky enough to have par- 



Museum in Fargo, ND, 
where he became the muse- 
um's assistant curator and 
print studio coordinator 
There he curated exhibi- 
tions and ran a residency 
program he said "attracted 
artists from around the 
world." 



American soldiers Iciiied in iatest vioience 



Louise Roug 

Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 



BAGHDAD, Sept. 20 - 
Insurgents killed nine 
Americans, including five 
members of the military, a 
State Department employee 
and three private security 
contractors, in a series of 
attacks across the northern 
and western areas of the 
country, U.S. officials said 
Tuesday. 

The military deaths 
pushed to at least 1,903 the 
number of U.S. troops killed 
in Iraq since the U.S. -led 
invasion began in March 
2003. 

A member of the military 
police was killed Tuesday 
when his vehicle was struck 
by a roadside bomb 75 miles 
north of Baghdad, the offi- 
cials said. On Monday, a 
roadside bomb killed four 
Marines in the town of 
Ramadi. 60 miles west of 
Baghdad. 

In the northern city of 
Mosul, three American secu- 
rity contractors and a U.S. 
diplomatic security agent 



were killed Monday morn- 
ing by a suicide car bomber 

The names of most of the 
victims were not immediate- 
ly release. However, in 
Washington the State 
Department released a 
statement identifying the 
diplomat as Assistant 
Regional Security Officer 
Stephen Eric Sullivan. 

"Steve was a brave public 
servant, a brave American, 
dedicated to his country and 
to helping the people of Iraq 
and the people of America," 
State Department 

spokesman Adam Ereli said. 
Despite this week's casual- 
ties, U.S. forces have experi- 
enced fewer deaths in 
September — 21 so far — 
than in recent months. In 
August, at least 85 U.S. 
troops lost their lives. At 
least 55 lost their lives in 
July. 

Military officials and 
experts warned against 
reading too much into the 
disparate figures, noting 
that casualties rise and fall 
as both U.S. -led forces and 
insurgents adapt to each 
other's tactics. 



"The conflict in Iraq, like 
most insurgencies, has been 
a 'learning contest,"' said 
Steven Metz, director of 
research at the U.S. Army 
War College's Strategic 
Studies Institute in 
Pennsylvania. "The insur- 
gents will discover some 
innovation, which from 
their standpoint works, and 
the coalition forces find a 
response." 

"From a strategic stand- 
point," he said, "ebbs and 
flows are always part of a 
protracted conflict." 

This month brought one of 
the deadliest days in 
Baghdad for Iraqi civilians 
since the beginning of the 
war On Sept. 13, a 

wave of suicide car bombs 
and ambushes killed at 
least 141 Iraqis, mostly 
Shiite Muslims. 

The following day. a group 
of mostly Sunni Arab insur- 
gents led by Jordanian mili- 
tant Abu Musab al-Zarqawi 
took responsibility for the 
attacks and declared an "all- 
out war against (Shiite 
Muslims), wherever they 
are in Iraq." 




"The Clarion Call" provides a synopsis of all criminal 

investigations as conducted by the Clarion University 

Public Safety for the month of September 2006. All 

information can be accessed on the Public Safety Web 

page. 

■ Thomas Dolan, 21, of Sidman, Pa., was seen on 
Sept. 18 staggering across Wood Street from Lot 7. 
Dolan did have a strong odor of alcoholic beverage on 
his breath and did fail the PET. Dolan was cited for 
Public Drunkenness. 

■ On Sept. 15 campus pohee received a report from a 
resident of Ralston Hall that he had received threaten- 
ing messages on his answering machine. The campus 
police investigation is ongoing. 

■ On Sept. 14 an unknown individual did leave 
human waste on the floor of the Ist floor men's rest- 
room in Becker Hall. 

■ Christian Hess, 18, of Philadelphia, Pa., and 
Joshua Hill, 19, of Lewistown, Pa., were charged with 
Possession of Marijuana and Possession of Drug 
Paraphernalia on Sept. 13. Officers on a follow-up 
investigation of another -incident found the residents 
of Wilkinson Hall to be in possession of possible drug 
paraphernalia and marijuana on May 3. Items seized 
were sent to Erie Crime Lab. The report done by Erie 
Regional Laboratory confirmed that items contained 
marijuana. 

■ On Sept. 13 it was reported to university police 
that an unknown actor(s) had thrown an item from a 
window beUeved to be on the 5th floor of Nair Hall 
and struck a vehicle on the Service Road. Incident is 
under investigation. 

■ On Sept. 13 known persons did kick the doors of 
the left elevator in Nair Hall causing damage to the 
elevator doors. 

■ On Sept. 10 an individual was observed at Lot E 
and Ralston Hall field to be Publicly Drunk, when 
detained individual became violent and attempted to 
escape. Individual found to be underage and during 
incident one of the officers involved sustained minor 
injuries. Charges are pending. 

■ On Sept. 8 an unknown person did scratch the hood 
of a Black Chevy Blazer while parked in parking lot 
10. 

■ On Sept. 6 university police found a vehicle parked 
in Lot 11 with damage done to the back windows. Two 
of the windows had been broken out. This offense is 
still under investigation. 

CLARIFICATION: 

■ Michael Bowman, 20, of Kersey, Pa., was identified 
on the police blotter entry for Sept. 8 and it was indicat- 
ed that he had been arrested for two counts of 
Corruption of Minors and one count of Criminal 
Conspiracy. Bowman has been charged with these 
crimes; however, he was notified of the pending charges 
by way of a summons and was not physically arrested 
and taken into custody. 



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THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex, Clarion, PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

Web: clarioncall.clarion.edu E-mail: cail@clarion.edu 

Executive Board 



Tom McMeekIn, 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dan Edington, 
Managing Editor 

John Santa, 
News Editor 

Ashley E. Angle, 
Features Editor 

Josh Woods, 
Sports Editor 

Jeannette Good, 
Copy & Design Editor 



Melissa Holiier, 
Photography Editor 

Jamie Flanagan, 
Business Manager 

Chelsey Hummel, 
Ad Sales Manager 

Ashley Boynes, 
Advertising Designer 

Tina Sickler, 
On-line Editor 

Paul Anderson, 
Circulation Manager 



Staff 

Lorie Abraham, Ryan Aloia, Ambri Alexander, Jennifer 
Angeles, Michael Balchin, Kerri BaUina, David Banks, Adam 
Bauer, Eddie Baumcratz, Jason Bice, Elisa Borger, Eric 
Bowser, Kurt Boyd, Brandi Brady, Katie Bullets, Daniel 
Burr, Kimberly Cammuso, Ashley Carter, Tyler Crissman. 
Jonathan Cofer, Kevin Colonna, Ryan Cornman, Lisa 
Covington, Brandon Devennie, Hilary Dieter, Jonathan 
Donelli, Jeffrey Donston, Sean Dreher, Jonathan Egbert, 
Lori Elmquist, Katie Fischer, Audrey Fiske, Danielle Gais, 
Shawn Glancy, Lindsay Grystar, Grant Herrnberger, Chris 
Hofer, Robyn Holz, Sara Hoover, Shandrial Hudson, Andy 
Johnson, Jennifer Kalgren, Emma Kelly, Beth Kibler, 
Brittnee Koebler, Jason Kooser, Shasta Kurtz, Joe Kuszaj, 
Lauren Macek, Michael Marcello, Chris McKissick, Nicole 
Meyer, Heather Moore, Megan Mullins, Cheyenne Patterson, 
Mollie Pifer, Morris Pratt, EUzabeth Presutti, Gayathri 
Rajendran, Zach Ramsey, Stephanie Rawson, Ryan Rhoades, 
Jeffry Richards, Sarah Roesch, Roberta Rosati, Lisa Sagan, 
Lindsey Schnieder, Jared Sheatz, Vicki Sheeler, Jennifer 
Shetter, Melody Simpsdti, Nathan Stahlman, Kristen Staley, 
Darrell Stanyard, Marc Steigeirwald, Tom Steihhagen, 
Lindsay Sturgeon, Kirwin Sutherland, Matt Topolski, Steve 
TVichtinger, Ariel Weaver, Kevin Wetter, Pam Wherry, Amber 
White, Jimi Wikander, Ryan Wolfe, Devon Yorkshire, Jessica 
Zelinsky 

Policies 

The Clarion Call is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communi- 
ties. The Call is published most Thursdays during the aca- 
demic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but 
reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctua- 
tion, and obscenity; the determination of which is the respon- 
sibility of the Editorin-Chief 

Opinions expressed in this paper are those of the writer or 
speaker, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the 
newspaper staff, student body. Clarion University or the 
community. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact informa- 
tion. They must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If 
the author of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they 
must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only 
based on available space and at the discretion of the 
Executive Board. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff They should schedule their co-cur- 
ricular when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill 
their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted 
a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. 
One copy is free! additional copies are $1.00. 



J 



Reader comments 
on column 

I am a senior here at 
Clarion University and I 
have read The Clarion Call 
since my freshmen year I 
have found the content 
within The Clarion Call to 
be tasteful and adhere to a 
certain level of journalistic 
professionalism for the most 
part, until recently. 

I recently read an article 
in The Clarion Call titled 
"Have fun at Home." As I 
began to read this article I 
found certain aspects of it to 
contain material that I felt 
was offensive and portrayed 
a stereotypical view of what 
a college students are like, 
as well as place the author's 
view of the Clarion 
University in a negative 
light. 

For instance, this particu- 
lar quote was offensive' 



"They've had to deal with 
the fact that the condom 
broke for 18 years and when 
they finally get you out of 
the house you keep coming 
back." I felt this quote was 
offensive to me because my 
parents were responsible 
and mature adults in their 
choice to have children. 

Another part of this article 
that I felt presented the 
Clarion University and its 
students in a rather dis- 
tasteful manner and pro- 
motes such behavior which 
the Clarion University 
would not do itself is this 
quote "Untrue. If all the 
freshmen girls go home, 
then how am I going to lure 
them to my apartment with 
promises of a 'good time.'" 

I feel that the suggestion 
made by the author is out of 
line. Furthermore, what the 
author is suggesting is quite 
inappropriate and severely 



im CLARION CALL 



JPagel. 



iS^IfilRMEi 




Too much sacrifice to overtlirow 'Tlie Sclieduie" 



Dan Edington 
Managing Editor 



I feel as though I live in a 
continuous state of being 
"out of time." I was born in 
to this world, as so many 
others, right into a time 
schedule. From the moment 
of birth, time grabs you by 
the head and doesn't let go 
until you hit a fork in a road 
labeled "Heaven this way" 
and "Hell this way." 

I think its rather ironic 
that during the time period 
in my life when I had the 
most homework (high 
school) was the same time 
period where people were 
telling me, "these are the 
greatest years of your life, 
enjoy them!" 

I personally don't find a 
life dictated by a rigorous 
scheduled that is forced 
upon me by the flow of soci- 
ety enjoyable. It creates a 
redundant pattern of day in 
and day out exercises that 
robs much of the time we 
actually have to live. A lot of 
times I have to sacrifice 
what I really want to do in 



order to meet a deadline set 
for me by someone else in a 
higher power 

The response I usually 
receive from a statement 
such as this is "that's life" or 
"welcome to the real world." 

I think it's sad that some 
people despise living their 
lives on a time schedule, 
and yet continue to do so as 
if it is impossible to stop, 
myself included. Perhaps 
there is too much sacrifice 
required to really over 
throw the malicious ruler 
called "The Schedule," 

And it's not that time 
and schedules are all 
bad. I understand why 
they are in place. 
They keep a complex 
and hectic world in 
some sort of order 
And I understand 
that there are certain 
people in life who are 
incapable of surviving 
without a tightly knit 
schedule such as diabetics 
and other individuals with 
chronic diseases. Fine, 
schedules aren't all evil. 

But it's a safe bet that if it 
wasn't for the impending 
danger of missing a deadline 
or running out of time, the 
over all stress level in my 
life alone would drop drasti- 
cally. Imagine instead of 



scheduling classes I could 
just learn whatever I want, 
when I wanted to? Wouldn't 
that just be great! 

Oh but wait! There are 
people who can do that 
because they have the 
money. I'm not even going to 
touch on the subject of 
money because I hate to love 
it and love to hate it. Then 
again, "time is money." Hey, 
maybe I'm onto something... 
Nah. 




I would have rather picked 
a major after exploring life a 
httle more. That is some- 
thing I cannot do for a cou- 
ple reasons. One of them is 
that I cannot afford to par- 
take in that lifestyle. Also 



late in high school there 
were individuals who began 
"strongly recommending" 
me figure out what major I 
wanted. And those people 
putting pressure on me were 
the good guys. 

Do you really think a col- 
lege cares if you enter their 
establishment undecided? 
No, they are more likely to 
milk a few more grand out of 
you before you decide how 
you want to spend the rest 
of your life earning the 
money to pay them back. 
Well, I've got to wrap 
this up because I've 
got a deadline to 
meet, which I'm 
pretty sure I've 
missed, and anoth- 
er story to write. 
Not to mention 
homework to get 
done, my career to 
plan out, my life to 
direct and manage to 
maintain some sort of 
emotional stability. And 
I do all this to satisfy other 
people. I blame time, and 
deadlines and the way socie- 
ty works. I will never be 
able to live my life truly the 
way I want to. But hey, 
that's life, right? 

The author is a junior com • 
munication major and 
English writing minor. 




Depression screening 

The National Institute of 
Mental Health reports that 
depressive disorders affect 
approximately 19 million 
adults in the United States 
alone. As a result, efforts 
aimed toward public educa- 
tion about depression have 
increased over the past sev- 
eral years. 

One such effort. National 
Depression Screening Day, 
is a nationwide public 
health event that is held 



yearly and is designed to 
raise awareness of the signs 
and symptoms of depression 
and to connect those in need 
with treatment. Last year 
more than 105,000 people 
attended screenings at 
8,000 sites nationwide. 

Depression cin affect men 
and women of every age, 
nationality and background. 
It is estimated that 80*90 
percent of those experienc- 
ing symptoms of depression 
can improve within several 
months once they receive 
treatment. Unfortunately, 
fewer than half of those 
affected actually seek treat- 
ment. 

Common symptoms of 
depression include feelings 
of sadness, hopelessness, 
worthlessness, restlessness, 
guilt and irritability, loss of 
pleasure in activities, 



changes in sleep and 
appetite, inability to concen- 
trate and thoughts of death 
or suicide. 

In observance of National 
Depression Screening Day, 
the Clarion University 
Department of Counseling 
Services and the Keeling 
Health Center will offer free 
screenings on Thursday, 
Sept. 29 from 10:00 a.m. - 
noon and 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 
p.m in 250/252 Gemmell. 

This marks the ninth year 
that Clarion University has 
participated in this event. 
All students, faculty, staff 
and community members 
are invited to come and take 
a short self-test, watch an 
informational video and talk 
individually with a mental 
health professional. 

Free 24-hour-a-day online 
screening for depression, 



bipolar disorder, generalized 
anxiety disorder and post- 
traumatic stress disorder, 
will also be available after 
Sept. 29 on the Counseling 
Services Web site 

(www.clarion.edu/student/ 
counseling). 

You will receive immedi- 
ate feedback about your 
score and referral informa- 
tion to campus resources if 
appropriate after complet- 
ing the online test. 

For more information 
about this event, please call 
393-2255 or stop by 148 
Egbert Hall. For additional 
sites participating in 
National Depression 

Screening Day outside the 
Clarion area, call 1-800-520- 
NDSD. 

-Mary Ann M. 

Fricko, Pay.D. 

Counaelor/Profeaaor 



lacks any sense of journahs- 
tic professionalism at all. 

Therefore, I hope that the 
next time I acquire my copy 
of The Clarion Call, I will 
not feel offended by the con- 
tent of an article which 
should not have been pub- 
lished or at best more care- 
fully edited to determine the 
appropriateness of its con- 
tent. 

- Ryan Brundage, 
student 



More reader 
comments on column 

Jason Bice's article in the 
last issue of The Clarion 
Cai/was a disgrace. I do not 
wish to attack his freedom 
of speech, however, I wish to 
express that I believe he is 
out of line with the vulgar 
manner he has chosen to 
express his opinions. With 
power over the written word 
comes not only responsibih- 
ty, but the moral obligation 
to enrich rather than 
degrade our society. Mr 
Bice still has a great deal to 
learn when it comes to prop- 
erly using the power over 
words that a writer is given. 

Bice's first mistake is to 
insult some of his potential 
audience openly. If he real- 



ly cared enough to sucess- 
fuUy persuade us, this is not 
the way to go. Though he 
may be thinking that infuri- 
ating the audience might 
grab their attention and 
make them consider his 
point of view, this is highly 
unlikely. The more probable 
response to his insolent arti- 
cle is to use his own harsh 
words as excuse to disregard 
his opinions as rational or 
even noteworthy. 

Do I even need to bother 
telhng Mr Bice that not 
everyone on campus was 
conceived because a condom 
broke, and that not all 
boyfriends and girlfriends 
cheat on each other when 
their significant others are 
not around to watch them? 
One cannot simply make 
venomous statements such 
as those featured in his arti- 
cle and have them magically 
become factual statistics. 

Now we come to the meat 
of my problem with Mr 
Bice's article. This is the 
reason I took it upon myself 
to write this humble rebut- 
tal to his otherwise nonsen- 
sical whining. Can you 
guess what I find so greatly 
offensive, Mr Bice? It's your 
despicable comment on tak- 
ing advantage of drunk 
girls. Mr. Bice seems to be 
saying that it is perfectly 



acceptable to lure a drunk 
girl into your bed rather 
than pursue a more mean- 
ingful relationship. He said 
this half-heartedly at least. 
I assume just half-heartedly 
enough to keep himself safe 
from accusations inciting 
rape. 

If the girl is drunk, how is 
that not taking advantage of 
her while she is in an 
impaired state of thinking? 
I may not be the keenest 
discerner of intent to thumb 
through this article, but 
that last statement sounds 
remarkably callous and 
malevolent. It seems as 
though Mr. Bice is, at best 
condoning, what seems to 
me, an unconscionable 
action. I hope he is capable 
of understanding that while 
it is your right to voice your 
own opinions, it is your obli- 
gation to be respectful of 
other human beings when 
doing so in a public forum. 
For some reason I do not 
perceive anything even 
resembling respect from Mr. 
Bice's article. 

If Mr Bice wants students 
to stay here and enjoy his 
company on the weekends, I 
would suggest he make 
more of an attempt to make 
his company enjoyable. I 
can agree with him in at 
least so much as to say that 



yes, it is a shame so many 
people are going home on 
the weekends. Yet my rea- 
soning for this disappoint- 
ment is in regards to the 
lack of activities here on the 
weekends. I frankly could- 
n't care less if Mr Bice's 
libido is unsatisfied right 
now. 

To insult The Call's audi- 
ence and tell them that their 
old friends "suck" is not only 
counter-productive to his 
cause, but a blatant abuse of 
the power of the written 
word. Perhaps in the future 
Mr Bice will consider the 
possibilities he has not 
explored with his last arti- 
cle. An incitement toward 
students creating more 
weekend activities they all 
can enjoy is an excellent 
example. 

There are, of course, many 
more articles similar to this 
he could explore. And I 
would willingly discuss 
them with him at leisure on 
some weekend here in 
Clarion. Just make sure it's 
not a weekend I plan to go 
home to visit my old friends, 
who by the way, respectfully 
request that I inform Mr. 
Bice he's the one who sucks. 
"Sorry about that," Mr. Bice. 

-Monia Pratt m, 
atudent 



1 1 



Page 4 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



September 22. 2005 




Phi 



™sIRpg@s 



Fall into religion 





David Grega 



It's that time of the year 
again, autumn. However, 
for many on campus, the 
transitions between sea- 
sons are more than just 
reminders of the year 
passing us by. These truly 
are reUgious events for 
those who practice any 
one of the myriad of 
nature-based religions, 
Wicca being the most pop- 
ular of which practiced on 
this campus. 

The autumnal equinox, 
Mabon as it is known by 
Wiccans in particular, is 
the second of three festi- 
vals celebrating the fruits 
of our hard work through- 
out the year; paralleling 
the harvests that are per- 
formed by European 
farmers. It is also a time 



for us to reflect upon the 
preparations that will 
need to be made for the 
cold winter months ahead, 
not just physically, but 
spiritually as well. 

This holy day is celebrat- 
ed primarily with a feast, 
similar to that which is 
part of American 
Thanksgiving. Other 
activities used to mark 
the occasion include group 
prayers to give thanks to 
the divine and a religious 
ceremony. This is one of 
eight holy days (called 
Sabbats) on the Pagan 
Calendar. 

To learn more about 
these Sabbats, Wicca and 
other aspects of 

Paganism-you are invited 
to join the Mystics Cove 
Pagan Network of Clarion 
University for Pagan 
Study in room 146 
Gemmell on Mondays at 7 
p.m. Everyone is welcome 
to join us, regardless of 
faith, to ask questions. 

The author is a senior 
computer science major 
and president of Mystics 
Cove Pagan Network of 
Clarion University. 




Ashley Boynes 
Advertising Designer 

s_amboynes@clarion.edu 



Fashion Foes 



People, the sequin purses 
are killing me. They were a 
novel idea when first intro- 
duced over six months ago. 
It has to strike you when 
you literally see the major- 
ity of females ages 9-99 
carrying the same style 
bags that they are no 
longer avant-garde. 

In teenage and twen- 
tysomething America, the 
notion of avant-garde fash- 
ion seems to have gone 
missing (or never was 
there to begin with). I 
think that American 
women were constructed 
without this gene of indi- 
viduality when it came to fashion. Naturally, not every- 
one falls into the category of being a victim of trendiness, 
but let's face it - so many have. 

Years ago, 1 thought it was cool to wear the huge avia- 
tor or "Jackie 0" style sunglasses. Although this style is 
still a personal favorite of mine, I cringe when I see 
teenyboppers rocking the same look because the latest 
"product-of- Disney" actress is wearing them. Thanks 
Lindsay Lohan and Nicole Richie! 

I thought that going to flea markets and buying vin- 
tage jewelry was a cool, unique style of my own, until I 
found that you can buy the same oversized beads at 
Charlotte Russe or any other mall store. Ahh, and the 
infamous newsboy cap. I loved them during high school, 
and still do (hey, I'm a hat girl!), but the overkill in the 
past few years has ruined THAT particularly charming 
idea. 

Next, cowboy boots (that I have been wearing for, I kid 
you not, 12 years now) will be the norm, every girl will 
have eyebrow piercings, and my fashion-forward friends 
and I will no longer stand out, but will more faces in the 
never-ending crowd of fashion faux paus. 

I do try to be avant-garde, as fashion is a passion of 
mine, but unless I decide to dress up like Owen's 
Harajuku Girls (who are actually pretty cool), everyone 
will be doing the same thing two months later. And then, 
the "trends" are NO LONGER TRENDY! 

The definition of trendy "should" be something cutting- 
edge, innovative, and styUsh. The definition of trend "is" 
(or seems to be) wearing what everyone else wears. 

However, fashion does go in cycles, so it is hard not to 
repeat something that hasn't been done already. If you 
take any modern-day trend that you can fathom and 
research it, it certainly has its roots much further back 
than you'd think. Also, many women, like myself, love 
haute couture but cannot afford the latest Dolce & 
Gabbana, Miu Miu or Heatherette looks, so we settle for 
less. And, alas, it is difficult not to buy the same stuff as 
everyone else when the malls all have the same stores, 
with the same super-cute ensembles in the windows call- 
ing your name. 

This is why 1 have taken to shopping online, reserving 
my nice and fashionable looks for evening, wearing 
hoodies to class, and wearing more vintage. 

I have always distinctly tried to stand out, while still 
being trendy, and classic. I will continue to do this, but I 
have one request... please, no more glittery, disco ball, 
sequined handbags. Adhere to this, and the fashion 
police will let you off with just a warning. 



Country has firsthand experience of devastation 



Lisa Covington 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

The effects of Hurricane 
Katrina are everywhere - 
television, radio, your e-mail 
inbox and the parking lot in 
our local Wal-Mart. The 
lives of many people have 
been shattered; not only 
those individuals that were 
in the path of Hurricane 
Katrina but also their loved 
ones who are located world- 
wide. 

The U.S. has now experi- 
enced the tragedy that 
many nations have already 
endured. Like many of you, 
I know where I was when I 
heard the news^ I was lis- 
tening to the radio and was 
waiting for the reporter to 
say this was happening 
somewhere else, not here at 
home. As I continued to hear 
the report, a survivor was 
interviewed and said in the 
most surreal and vulnerable 
voice: "This makes 9/11 look 
like child's play - we need 
help now!" 

People from all over the 
world have answered to the 
cry for help. A woman from 



Texas is housing complete 
strangers she met in the 
parking lot of the 
Superdome in New Orleans; 
countless organizations are 
providing monetary sup- 
port; universities are help- 
ing displaced students to 
attend college and there is 
an endless amount of people 
providing donations. 

The media coverage has 
provided the much needed 
publicity to inform the glob- 
al community of the effects 
of Hurricane Katrina. 
Before Aug. 29 what did you 
consider news? Jennifer 
Wilbanks faking a kidnap- 
ping, the war in Iraq, the 
nomination of John Roberts 
to the Supreme Court or the 
season premier of "7th 
Heaven;" no matter what we 
considered news before, this 
devastation is what we will 
be living with for years to 
come. 

On one end of the spec- 
trum, I see the faces of the 
disaster. They have varied 
in color, shapes and sizes. 
Each day on the front page 
of the newspaper I see men 
and women of color talking 
about their families; how 




>peai 

Loudly 



they hope to rebuild soon or 
reunite with missing loved 
ones. 

On the other end, the First 
Lady explained how she 
agreed with her husband 
even though the federal 
response to victims was 
delayed. As the interview 
progressed, she was asked 
about several comments 
from public figures, includ- 
ing rapper Kanye West. In 
response to Hurricane 
Katrina and the large 
impact on the communities 
of color, West said, "George 
Bush does not care about 
black people." The reporter 
also brought up Howard 



Dean's recent assertion that 
"skin color, age and econom- 
ics played a deadly role in 
who survived and who did 
not." Mrs. Bush labeled 
these comments "disgust- 
ing," arguing that the 
President "cares about 
everyone in our country." 

Although these comments 
are subjective, it still brings 
to light many issues that 
were at hand, ranging from 
age to zip code. 

During the time that I 
heard the news, I was in 
Central Florida, a location 
that many displaced sur- 
vivors sought as a refuge. 
While I had my own trou- 
bles attempting to fly back 
to Pittsburgh, I realized 
that my delayed flights were 
minor compared to the peo- 
ple who lost their lives, 
homes and loved ones. The 
intent of this is not to solicit 
or judge you, the reader's 
actions, as a result of the 
hurricane, but to get you to 
(hopefully) think about your 
own life. Each week I hope 
to provide you with words of 
wisdom; listen to Gandhi 
and "Be the change you 
wish to see in the world." 



Personalities and pop songs: a checklist 



Paul Anderson 
Circulation Manager 

s_pmanclerson@clarion.edu 

Internet dating has 
become a cottage industry 
nowadays; it's hard not to 
know someone who's been 
on one of the many sites, 
like e-Harmony. 

For those dating illiter- 
ates; one signs up on the 
sites, makes a profile detail- 
ing oneself and matchmak- 
ing ensues. Fun sidenote^ 
I've known people who, after 
completing the profile, were 
told by the website, "There 
is no one for you. We're 
sorry." I'm serious. 

Because I think along odd 
lines of logic at times, I won- 
dered what the hell I would 
say of myself on one of those 
sites. I dislike them as a 
rule and, besides, how many 
times can you ask "What do 
you do for a living?" on a 
awkward first date before 
you go insane? 

Anyway, I tried to think of 
how I would describe 
myself. Would 1 say I was 
handsome? Too egotistical; I 
sound like the type of guy 




who spends too much time 
admiring his profile in the 
mirror. Besides, I'm not that 
handsome. I've been 
described as cute... but you 
never hear that you're butt- 
ugly in polite company, do 
you? 

All right, avoid the physi- 
cal. What's my personality 
like? Am I funny, or only 
dryly sarcastic? Intelligent 
or merely pedantic? 
Approachable and friendly 
or militantly standoffish? 
Am I articulate or do I just 
babble and rant long enough 
for people to get a rough pic- 
ture of what I'm talking 
about? 

Unfortunately, I found 
myself leaning towards the 
latter choices. 

And besides, none of those 
illuminating phrases really 
felt true to me. I felt like I 
was hamming it up. Doubt 



The 
pumping 

Ground 



me? Sit down and try to 
describe yourself. Unless 
you have an ego as radioac- 
tive as Three Mile Island, 
how you describe yourself 
won't work or feel right. It's 
like trying to do a self- mas- 
sage. No one gets out the 
knots like someone else. But 
having character witnesses 
on dating sites (or for 
moments of semi-drunken 
reflection) doesn't really 
work. It kinda defeats the 
purpose. 

I goaded myself for 
answers. 1 harangued. 1 
made myself cry. You are 
your own worst enemy. 

And, I found out, how I 
would describe myself is 
totally without adjectives; I 
rely on books and movies 
and music. It's entirely 
materialistic and anti- 
Buddhist, but nothing 
describes my attitude like 



Nick Hornby's "High 
Fidelity," my gallows sar- 
casm like the narrator in 
Chuck Palanhuik's "Fight 
Club," my impulsiveness 
like a chord-change in 
Fountains of Wayne's "The 
Senator's Daughter," my 
obsessive nature like when I 
used to TiVo "Inside 
Politics" and "Crossfire" on 
CNN. 

You can't put this in a pro- 
file. I come off as shallow 
and superficial and not seri- 
ous. Well, I'm here to tell 
you, nothing is as serious as 
an All-Time Top Five Desert 
Island list of the girls who 
hurt me or track-one-side- 
ones on rock albums. 

If I learned nothing from 
this (and I'm pretty sure I 
didn't), I shouldn't reflect 
while drinking Miller Lite. I 
would think about it deeper, 
but I might think of another 
thing to compare myself to 
and being that I already feel 
flippant and aloof, that's 
probably not a good idea. I 
feel bad enough without 
comparing myself to some 
pop song. 



Get in touch with your inner f rat 



Jason Bice 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJabice@clarion.edu 

Do you have trouble mak- 
ing friends? Is sitting in 
your dorm room download- 
ing porn all day just getting 
to be too routine? Well, if 
you answered yes to these 
questions then get ready to 
put on your trucker hats 
and pop your collars 
because, have I got a deal 
for you! 

Now many will ask, "What 
kind of deal, Jason Bice? A 
drug deal?" 

No. No. The deal I'm refer- 
ring to is joining a frat. And 
I'm not talking about just 
any old frat; I'm talking 
about my frat. Delta lota 
Chi or DIX for short. 
Because we all know that 
joining a fake fraternity is 
10 times as cool as joining a 
real one. 

You all may be wondering 
why I feel my frat is better 
than the other ones on cam- 
pus. 

When most new fraternity 
members start out, they 
sometimes make the mis- 
take of calling their fraterni- 
ty a "Frat." They are quickly 
scolded by the elder broth- 
ers and are asked the classic 
question, "Would you call 




your country a 'part of the 
female anatomy'?" Not here 
at DIX. We proudly call our- 
selves "Fratties." Besides, if 
you shortened "country" it 
would be pronounced 
"count," not the other thing. 

Another thing about most 
fraternities is that once 
you're in, you have to pre- 
tend to like everyone else 
that's in. At DIX, you can 
hate all your brothers. For 
example, if you have a prob- 
lem with Jimmy because he 
stole your Magic: The 
Gathering cards, you can 
just take him to the octagon 
outside the house and beat 
the living crap out of him. 

"How's the party scene at 
DIX?" I'm glad you asked. 
We've all been to regular 
frat parties. Sure it's a good 
time, but we have some- 
thing that the others don't; 
Tony Danza. I mean who 
doesn't like him? He's an 
American hero. 






So suppose a police officer 
comes a-knockin on our door 
during a big bash. We just 
let Tony out of his cage, he 
tap dances; the cops 
applaud and then they 
leave. No jail time for us 
tonight. 

As for the parties them- 
selves, we've got the three 
B's, Beer, "girls", and 
Battleship. Obviously "girls" 
doesn't begin with "B" but 
something else does. What's 
better is that not only are 
the girls hot, but they want 
to have sex with you! These 
girls love DIX. Sure we pay 
them, but it's a hell of a lot 
better than waking up next 
to a mistake you'll regret for 
the rest of your life. 

And what party would be 
complete without bever- 
ages? For the manly men, 
such as myself, we have 
Mike's Hard Lemonade on 
tap at all times. For you 
sissies who drink beer, we 



have American Light. 

Still not convinced? Who 
wants to do community 
service? 1 know I don't, but 
if you join any other frat 
you're going to have to. Who 
cares about the stupid com- 
munity anyway? Not us 
DIX, that's for sure. We only 
care about wearing 
skintight shirts so everyone 
can see our nips. 

"What about pledging?" All 
the other frats keep what 
goes on during hell week a 
secret, except for something 
stupid like the scavenger 
hunt. We have a scavenger 
hunt too! In our scavenger 
hunt, though, you only have 
to find one thing, our sweet- 
heart's baby's daddy. This 
will be tough since she's 
slept with like 50 guys, but 
we don't have the money to 
get a DNA test and Maury's 
booked until next year. 

Finally, every fraternity 
has dues. DIX is the same in 
this aspect. I mean we have 
to pay the hookers right? 
For the small cost of your 
book money, you can become 
a full-fledged member of 
this great brotherhood. 
Seriously, who needs books? 
Books are for nerds. You're 
only going to be here a year 
before you fail out anyway. 
Why not spend it the way 
you want to? 



September 22. 2005 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



Page 5 



Mtim 



Human Race Machine comes to Clarion University 



Ariel Weaver 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

"Seeing is believing." This 
familiar proverb expresses 
the commonly held assump- 
tion that visible reality 
equals truth; which is now 
made possible more then 
ever thanks to artist and 
inventor Nancy Burson. 
Nancy Burson is best 
known for her pioneering 
work in morphing technolo- 
gy, which enables law 
enforcement officials to 
locate missing children and 
adults. Along with her mor- 
phing technology, Burson 
has made it possible to view 
a variety of other experi- 
ments through her inven- 
tion, the Human Race 
Machine. 

The Human Race Machine 
will be in the rotunda of 
Gemmell Student Complex, 
9 a.m.-4 p.m.. Sept. 19-23. 
Four programs of the 
Human Race Machine will 
be available for experimen- 
tation. Burson's patented 
technology captures a per- 
son's image while sitting in 
front of the machine. You 
then may use the four differ- 
ent programs. The Age 
Machine, The Anomaly 
Machine, The Couples 
Machine and The Human 
Race Machine, to apply the 



changes one would like to 
see. 

The Age Machine allows 
one to seewhat he or she will 
look like aged. This pro- 
gram has been used for over 
20 years to enable the FBI 
and the National Center for 
Missing and Exploited 
Children to help locate kid- 
nap victims. The Anomaly 
Machine allows one the 
unsettling opportunity of 
seeing him or herself with 
simulated facial anomalies. 
This may include a sunken 
in face or a missing nose. 
Next and probably the 
most popular machine to 
college students, is The 
Couples Machine. This 
machine combines photo- 
graphs of couples so that 
they may see the outcome of 
their offspring, or simply 
the envision layered "male- 
ness" and "femaleness" in 
one's face. 

The Human Race Machine 
allows you to see yourself 
with the facial characteris- 
tics of six different races 
mapped onto your image. 

For over 25 years, artist 
Nancy Burson has been 
showing her viewers the 
unseen and asking them to 
shift their vision. Her 
inventions and artwork 
have all been different 
pieces to the puzzle called 
equality. Burson started 



these machines to show that 
everyone is equal; it's just 
how one perceives it. 

From her earliest days as 
a painter she has always 
been interested in the inter- 
action of art and science. 
She is best known for her 
contributions to computer 
technology (the technique 
we now refer to as morph- 
ing) involving face composit- 
ing and techniques enabling 
law enforcement officials to 
age missing children and 
adults. Those techniques 
were responsible for finding 
four children in the first 
year of their use alone. 

By the late 1980s, Burson 
had begun to explore how 
beauty was defined in our 
society. While investigating 
the subject of beauty, she 
came across it's opposite - 
deformity - which ultimately 
led Burson to photographing 
children with craniofacial 
anomalies. This was all in 
hopes to heroically overcome 
the challenge of selfaccept- 
ance. In the late 90s she 
took it one step farther. She 
completed a series of por- 
traits of real people. Her 
goal was to emphasize the 
commonality of people 
rather than their difference 
or separateness. Titled 
"He/She," the series inten- 
tionally challenged the indi- 
vidual's notion of self-per- 




Melissa Holliet/ ,i,<^ Clanon Call 
HUMAN RACE MACHINE - Chelsey Hummel tries out the human race machine to see what she 
would look like at age 47. She was also about to see what she would look like as a different race, 
and what she would look like with a facial disformity. 



ception by allowing viewers 
to see beyond superficial 
sexual difference to our com- 
mon humanity. 
Most importantly The 
Human Race Machine was 
created to give the society 
the excellent opportunity to 
explore how we perceive 
ourselves as well as each 
other. The more we can rec- 
ognize ourselves within 



each other, the more we can 
connect the human race. 
Burson hopes that with this 
machine everyone can real- 
ize that there is only one 
race, the human race. 
"The concept of race is not 
genetic, but social. There is 
no gene for race. The 
Human Race Machine 
allows us to move beyond 
difference and arrive at 



sameness. We are all one," 
said Burson. 

The Martin Luther King, 
Jr. Committee and Minority 
Student Services will be 
sponsoring The Human 
Race Machine in order for 
any Clarion student to come 
experience. 



Circle K offers way to get involved in community service 



Amber White 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Students interested in 
community service now 
have another organization 
to choose from; Circle K 
International. Headed by 
sophomore biology major 
Marissa Angevine, this 
group's mission, according 
to its website, is promoting 
"service and fellowship to its 
members and to the commu- 
nity that they serve." 
Circle K International was 
founded by the Kiwanis 
Club in 1933 in Pullman, 
Wash. It began as a fraterni- 
ty, with a house that was 



rented to young men need- 
ing help in order to go to col- 
lege. In 1947 it dropped its 
Greek letters and turned 
into a service organization, 
and its first charter was at a 
college in Illinois. Two years 
later a chapter was formed 
in Canada making Circle K 
an international organiza- 
tion. The Pennsylvania 
District is the second- 
largest, which was made 
larger by the Clarion chap- 
ter. Lock Haven and 
Mansfield Universities 
recently added a chapter 
too. 

What makes Circle K 
International different from 
other organizations? It gives 



students an opportunity for 
networking. Members of 
the Kiwanis Club are 
involved in many different 
businesses, providing oppor- 
tunities for internships, job 
shadowing and more. 
Opportunities for leadership 
are available at chapter, dis- 
trict and even national lev- 
els. The organization also 
has a strong emphasis on 
fellowship, a throwback to 
its early days as a fraternity. 
Conventions are held each 
year both on the district and 
international levels. Last 
year's international conven- 
tion was held in Honolulu, 
Hawaii. 

Each year the districts 



take on a new District proj- 
ect, benefiting certain chari- 
table organizations. The 
Pennsylvania District 

Project for this year is called 
"Mission Possible^ Curing 
Juvenile Diabetes." Service 
toward that goal includes 
such events as the Walk for 
Diabetes. 

However, there are many 
other service projects in 
which Circle K is involved. 
Already, signups have been 
posted for the Red Cross for 
members to be trained to 
help victims of Hurricane 
Katrina. 

Participants, once trained, 
will travel down to New 
Orleans during winter 



break to assist in whatever 
ways are necessary. 
On a more localized bend, 
the Kiwanis Club French 
Fry Stand will be accepting 
people to train to work dur- 
ing the Autumn Leaf 
Festival this October. 
Training is this Saturday at 
the First Baptist Church on 
Main Street. Trainees will 
be able to work during 
A.L.F. from Oct. 2-9. Other 
local service projects include 
"storytime" at the Clarion 
Free Library and participa- 
tion in the United Way 5K 
Race. Participation in the 
race doesn't just include 
running; other jobs, such as 
directing traffic, are avail- 



able. 

Becoming a member of 
Circle K International 
requires several steps, 
divided into service and fel- 
lowship categories. Five 
service projects must be 
completed, as well as partic- 
ipation in a fundraising 
event or acting as chairper- 
son on a project. Fellowship 
requirements include a 
choice of division or district 
formals, the district or inter- 
national convention, or any 
Circle K social events. 
Members pay about $42 per 
year in dues, split between 
national and district offices. 



Share your space, but live on your own. 





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Page 6 



CLARION 



September 22. 2005 



Sparky's Pizza Buffet offers 'all you can eat' to community members and students 



Jeff Donston 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Matt Park... does that name 
ring a hell? Well how about 
the name Sparky? Because 
if one has heard the name 
Sparky, then he or she 
already knows who Matt 
Park is. Park is the owner 
and operator of Clarion's 
new pizza shop, located at 
511 Main Street, Sparky's 
Pizza Buffet. 

Matt became "Sparky" 
about 10 years ago at a 
party. His friends gave him 
the nickname and it has 
stuck ever since. 

This is Sparky's first ven- 
ture into the food business. 
Why is Sparky's Pizza 
Buffet often crowded with 
patrons? Why is it becoming 
one of Clarion's new hot 
spots? Well, there are three 
reasons. 

One, the food. Sparky's 
offers a pizza buffet that 
includes 14 to 16 different 



pizza and dessert pizzas. 
Sparky said the favorite, 
other then pepperoni 
pizza, is chicken alfredo. 
Sparky's buffet also has a 
salad bar including 
American and Caesar sal- 
ads, penne and spaghetti 
pasta. 

Two, Sparky's is a grow- 
ing business due to the 
prices. All one needs to eat 
at Sparky's is a five dollar 
bill. Five dollars will get 
each patron his or her 
choice of anything on the 
buffet line no matter what 
time of day it is. 

Three, people are always 
eating at Sparky's. This 
possibly could be the 
most important reason. 
Just like any other buffet, 
Sparky's is magical 
because of those four little 
words, ALL YOU CAN EAT 
Sparky's chefs cook pizzas 
constantly, keeping the buf- 
fet stocked, so one can keep 
refilling his or her plate as 
many times as he or she 




ALL YOU CAN EAT - 

pasta and dessert 



Katie Bullers/frte Clarion Call 
Sparky's Pizza Buffet offers all you can eat pizza, 



likes. 

"The different types of 
pizza really hit the spot 
when you are craving that 
never ending amount of 
food," said Brad Gardner, a 
Sparky's patron. 
Sparky is a native of Sigel, 



Pa. and a graduate of 
Brookville High School. He 
is the former head wrestling 
coach at Brockway but came 
to Clarion after finding a 
great spot to open up a pizza 
shop. 
Sparky said that the pizza 



buffet is one of the biggest 
growing food franchises 
right now, according to 
foodfranchise.com. a com- 
prehensive resource for 
the food franchise indus- 
try. The number one rated 
Italian restaurant, by 
Kntrepreneur Magazine, 
is a popular pizza buffet 
franchise. That same pop- 
ular pizza buffet is also 
number two in sales 
growth among pizza 
chains. Sparky said he got 
into the pizza buffet busi- 
ness, "to get ahead of the 
trend." 

Sparky already has 
experience in manage- 
ment and sales. "Cooking 
was the only learning 
experience." He said the 
best part of owning his 
own restaurant is, "the posi- 
tive reactions from the com- 
munity and the repeat busi- 
ness." 

Sparky's vision for his 
three to four person run 
restaurant is to create a 



family atmosphere during 
the lunch and dinners 
hours, where families can 
come and have some good 
food. 

But he also said that he 
keeps the restaurant open 
late at night to cater to the 
college students. 

Sparky said, "I know what 
it's like to be in college and I 
wanted to create a place 
where students can come in 
late at night and sit down 
and eat without being has- 
sled." 

Sparky said he enjoys liv- 
ing in a college town 
because he enjoys "the col- 
lege kids and the college 
atmosphere." He said he 
likes living in Clarion 
because "it is a nice town; 
nice community." 

Sparky's Pizza Buffet is 
located at 511 Main Street 
and is open until 3 a.m. 
Monday through Saturday 
and 7 p.m. on Sundays. 



ASiimcrfyRMGiirE 




Dear Dr. Eagle, 

Even though school just started I feel like there is not enough time in the day 
to get all of my work done. I have a full load this semester. I have a job on campus and 
I am involved in several clubs. Do you have any time management tips to help me get 
through my day? 

Signed, 
Overwhelmed 



Dear Overwhelmed, 

You have a lot going on right now. Try and stay 
relaxed through out your day so you are not over- 
whelmed. Here are some tips on time manage- 
ment: 

•Make a to-do list: In the morning make a to-do 
list; start with the most important items and 
work your way down. If you know what you have 
to accomplish during the day you are more likely 
to get it done. Make your list a reasonable size; 
don't overload it. It needs to be attainable and 
realistic. Cross off items as you achieve them. 
Seeing your list get smaller will help you relax. 
■Learn to say no: If you feel that you are taking on 
too many tasks because people are asking you to 
help, you can say no. You should not feel that you 
have to take on every task you are given. Explain 
to that person that you have homework or a test 
to study for. They will understand, and you will 
have time to do your work. 
■Study when you work best: Pind out what time of 
the day you work best. Some people learn better 
in the morning, while others learn better in the 
afternoon or at night. Don't do work late at night 
if you are not able to focus. You will not learn the 
information you need to retain for class. Also try reading in between classes if you have 
a lot to do. You can read a couple of pages while you are waiting for a class to begin. 
Differentiate between short and long study times. If you have a little to study you can 
achieve it in a little bit of time, but if you have a lot of studying to do make sure you 
give yourself enough time. 
« Good night's rest: One of the most important things is to get a good.nighfs sleep. If 
you are tired the following morning your day will seem longer and your tasks will seem 
more difficult. You should try to get between six and seven hours of sleep a night. 
■ Don't agonize: The final tip is don't waste time by agonizing. Spending your day wor- 
rying about what you should be doing will not help get things done. Instead of agoniz- 
ing and procrastinating, just get the task done. 



Doctor Eagle is written by Sarah Wilson, of the Keeling Health Center. For more infor- 
mation or to suggest a topic, please contact her s_smwilson@clarion.edu. 




WCUB TV Fall Schedule 



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Tobeco' holds open mic night 



Ellsa Borger 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

There was more going on 
at Michelle's Cafe on 
Wednesday, Sept. 19 than 
just drinking iced lattes. At 
6 p.m. it was all about 
expressing oneself: Tobeco 
held its first 'Open Mic 
Night' of the semester. 

For those unfamiliar with 
the term "Tobeco," it is a lit- 
erary and artistic journal 
put together by Clarion 
University students. The 
most current journal was 
published last semester, and 
the issue was actually the 
first time color photos and 
art were published in it. 

"Tobeco" contains poems 



along with photography, giv- 
ing one a chance to see a 
whole other side of the stu- 
dents in Clarion. However, 
one aspect one doesn't get to 
experience by reading the 
journal is the musical aspect 
of it. Many talented Clarion 
students came out to the 
open mic night and per- 
formed acoustic and electric 
guitar. 

A warm hello from the edi- 
tor, Jen Hetrick, kicked off 
the night. She also gave a 
little background informa- 
tion on "Tobeco." A guitar 
duet followed her introduc- 
tion. Gorav Guiati, also 
known as "G," played elec- 
tric guitar and Ryan 
Adamiak covered a song by 
the Dave Matthews Band. 



Another performer that 
blew the crowd away was, 
Ryan Waterman, as she 
strummed away on a few 
acoustic songs. Hetrick then 
read a few selections from a 
poet that will actually be 
visiting Clarion on Sept. 29. 
Following the poetry read- 
ing was Adamiak and Dave 
Durney who played com- 
plete improv. Students read 
their own poetry. 

Throughout the evening, 
students came in and filled 
the once empty seats, to 
support their friends and 
fellow students. "Tobeco" 
plans to host another open, 
mic night. 




Katie Bullers/r/ie Clarion Call 

OPEN MIC NIGHT - Ryan Adamiak and Gorav Guiati covered a Dave Matthews Band song as part 
of Tobeco's open mic night. 



Ambassador contest now open 



Kevin Wetter 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

The Clarion University 
credit union is holding a 
Youth Ambassador Contest. 
Anyone that is a member of 
the credit union can apply. 
The last day applications 
are being accepted is Sept. 
26. 

Alice J. Swartzfager is the 
manager/financial officer of 
the credit union. 

"The credit union is a non- 
profit financial institution 
owned by the members, and 
we serve our members." 
Swartzfager said. A student 
can join the credit union by 
maintaining a minimum of 
five dollars in their account. 
That equals one share of 
ownership. 

"A member can use all the 
services that are available 
to them," Swartzfager said. 

Besides being a member of 



the credit union there are 
additional requirements a 
student must meet to enter 
the contest. They have to be 
between the ages of 17 and 
25. They have to be able to 
prepare and present a one- 
to two-minute speech. They 
also must be able to take a 
knowledge test on the fun- 
damentals of the credit 
union. 

The competition is broken 
down into three sections to 
determine the youth ambas- 
sador of Pennsylvania. The 
three competitions are held 
at a local level, a chapter 
level, and a state level. 

"The local competition is 
held here at the credit 
union. The scholarship com- 
mittee puts them through 
the competition," 

Swartzfager said. 

The winner of the local 
competition moves on to the 
chapter competition, which 
is held in DuBois. Pa. If a 



contestant is fortunate 
enough to win the chapter 
level they advance to the 
state competition, which is 
held in Atlantic City, N.J. In 
recent years Clarion has 
sent three contestants to the 
state level. 

Swartzfager said, "The 
competitions are almost 
identical at every level." 

Cash rewards are also 
received at each level. 

A youth ambassador can 
be defined in several ways. 
Swartzfager stated, "A 
youth ambassador promotes 
youth to the credit union." 

Not only are there cash 
rewards at every stage of 
the competition; it is an all 
expenses paid trip for the 
duration of the contest. 

No one has applied for the 
local competition yet, appU- 
cations are still being 
accepted at 152 Gemmell 
Complex. 



September 22. 2005 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



Page 7 



tiMimnt 



Washington kicks off IVILK series 



Jared Sheatz 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Sept. 19 - "We 
gotta keep the Martin 
Luther King spirit alive," 
Ebony Washington, poet, 
kicked off her performance 
at Hart Chapel on Sept. 19 
at 7:30 p.m. The New York 
City native's show was the 
first event of the MLK series 
this year at Clarion 
University. Washington cre- 
ated her own style of poetry, 
she considers herself a 
Poetlitician. She is the 
founder of POetLITICAL, 
whose goal is to bring social- 
ly conscious arts back to 
popular culture. 

Washington is a very ener- 
getic poet. She also joked 
with the crowd between 



poems. 

She performed a very emo- 
tional poem, "Right Here," 
which deals with uniting 
women all over the globe, 
but focusing on the women 
of Afghanistan. The crowd 
responded with enormous 
applause. She also recited 
poems about black men and 
the stereotypes that they 
face in the world today and 
a poem about the late great 
civil rights leader Shirley 
Chisholm. 

"Windows on the World" 
was also recited later in the 
performance followed by 
"Applicant #14." "I love to 
end with this poem," 
Washington said. 

Secondary education 
English major, Megan Crain 
said, "She was really good, 
very inspirational and was a 




Morris PratV^/ie Clarion Call 

Spoken Word Art- Ebony Washington performs at Hart Chapel. 



crowd pleaser." 

This is Washington's third 
year performing and speak- 
ing for college students. 

Washington said, "I start- 



ed writing poetry when I 
was a senior in college. I 
went to a read-in one night, 
and, after I got home, I 
decided to write a poem." 



'Lord of War/ more true than film fantasy 




Nathan Stahlman 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

"Lord of War" 

Director: Andrew Niccol 

Lions Gate Films 

rating: 4/5 !|t l|lr 1$n|r 

"Lord of War," based on 
actual events, takes an in- 
depth and somewhat fright- 
eningly truthful look into 
the world of gun-running. 
This film does so by follow- 
ing the life of arms dealer 
Yuri Orlov (Nicolas Cage). 
Orlov, an American-raised 
Ukrainian, grew up in a 
rough section of New York 
City, making encounters 
with guns unavoidable. His 
father owned a restaurant, 



always saying it's a good 
business to be in because 
people will always have the 
need to eat. One fateful day 
Yuri had an epiphany. He 
realized people, since pre- 
history, have had the need 
to fight each other. 

From there, the film chron- 
icles Orlov's adventures in 
gun-running. It follows his 
rise from small time to the 
very best in the business 
through 20 years of conflict. 
Along with battling his con- 
science and keeping his wife 
Ava (Bridget Moynahan) 
from finding out about his 
other "lives," Orlov has sev- 
eral run-ins with Interpol 
agent Jack Valentine 
(Ethan Hawke) who is 
determined to put him 
behind bars for the rest of 
his hfe. 

This film was very well put 
together. Writer and 
Director Andrew Niccol 
must have done a lot of 
research to keep the facts 
straight and the timeline in 
order. He worked with actu- 



al gun-runners in the pro- 
duction of this film and used 
a stockpile of 3000 real AK- 
47s because it was cheaper 
than getting that many prop 
guns. The squadron of tanks 
in one scene belonged to a 
gun runner and was sold to 
another country after he 
had finished with them. 

I also loved the story line 
in this movie. I thought it 
was going to turn into the 
typical Hollywood moral 
story, but was pleasantly 
surprised. I don't want to 
ruin the movie for you so I 
won't say any more. 

Cage's character was 
smooth, cool and quick-wit- 
ted much like his character 
in "Matchstick Men" (with- 
out the mental disorder). 
Though his performance 
isn't as good as it was in 
"Matchstick Men" or 
"Adaptation" (two of his best 
films in my opinion) he 
played a very convincing 
arms dealer. It almost had 
me wanting to be just like 
him but then I remembered 



the most important rule of 
gun-running, "Never get 
shot with your own mer- 
chandise," I think it would 
be rather difficult to keep to 
that rule when dealing with 
dictators and tyrants. You 
might ask how a man like 
this can live with himself 
but he has many convincing 
ways of defending his pro- 
fession, not the least of 
which is the fact that the 
American government 

remains the largest arms 
supplier in the world. 

If you want to sit back and 
be entertained by a typical 
Hollywood movie and come 
out of the theater feeling 
inspired and high on life, go 
see "Just Like Heaven." 
However, if you want to be 
intrigued by an intelligent 
look into the dirty political 
world of illegal gun traffick- 
ing that could only be more 
real if it was a documentary, 
watch "Lord of War." It'll 
give your brain that work- 
out Hollywood fantasy life 
movies can't. 



Local bands heat up firehall 




Jon Gofer 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Sept. 16 - A 
crowd formed inside 
Limestone Firehall on Sept. 
16 after 5"-30 p.m. for a local 
music show. The admission 
was five dollars to see more 
than a handful of bands. 

At the other side of the 
room the first band's equip- 
ment was already set up at 
the same level as the audi- 
ence. Just after 6 p.m., the 
first band started warming 
up. Fallbrooke started off 
the evening by announcing 
that this was their first 



show. For their first time 
playing, the Christian hard- 
core band played a humble 
but intense set, much more 
raw and dynamic than the 
rest of the show. 

Vocalist Jeremy Yothers 
later said, "To be honest, I 
was so nervous since this 
was our first show. I almost 
threw up 10 minutes before 
we got here - my head was 
out the window. But it went 
real well, we were glad to be 
accepted since we were more 
hardcore than the rest of the 
bands playing." 

Vocalist/bassist Ben 
Newman said, "I was sur- 
prised by the crowd. 1 
expected maybe 10 to 15 
people to show up this early, 
but there were over 30 even 
for the first act. It was a 
good feeling that they liked 
our show." 

Unfortunately for 
Fallbrooke, their first show 
was also the first of three 




The Calm Before 



Courtesy of The Calm Before/Matt Adams 

The band plans for more local shows. 



their guitarist Mike 
Johnson will be playing 
before he has to leave the 
band for school and work. 

Up next was Inside Ambry, 
who had a lot of fun playing 
their set. They joked around 
within the band and with 
the crowd, especially fans 
they knew personally. 

The Clarion - based band 
rightAFTERnow was the 
next band that played. 

Practically Single took the 
stage with lots of energy, 
getting the crowd moving. 
Not only did the band move 
around on stage a lot, but 
since the stage was at the 
same level as the audience, 
the lead singer stepped out 
into the crowd and moved 
around singing, making the 
mood more intimate. 

There was a bit of confu- 
sion as the next band start- 
ed to set up. Practically 
Single had announced that 
The Calm Before would play 
next, but this band only con- 
sisted of one of their musi- 
cians. "We're Trees," 
Guitarist Joel Masters from 
The Calm Before 

announced. "The Calm Be- 
forest!" he added, jokingly. 
Trees is made up of four 
members, including Patrick 
Gallagher. drummer of 
Ahimsa Sunrise, and gui- 
tarist Masters from The 
Calm Before. The band had 
formed only a week earlier 
and had one song, which 
they played. The newly 
assembled band received a 



great response from the 
crowd for their one song set. 
After three-fourths of 
Trees left the stage. The 
Calm Before finally started 
playing. The crowd was 
really into them, as they 
have quickly become a popu- 
lar band in the area. Laura 
Miller, psychology major, 
said, "When I heard The 
Calm Before was playing I 
knew I had to make it to the 
show. It took a while to find 
a ride and get directions to 
the place - but it was defi- 
nitely worth it!" 

Ahimsa Sunrise, from 
DuBois, Pa., finished the 
show. Their music varied 
from melodic and quiet to 
aggressively hardcore. By 
now there were groups of 
people enjoying the perform- 
ance while sitting on tables 
along the wall and the mood 
felt more relaxed, though 
the music wasn't necessarily 
more relaxed. 

"We've had shows here 
before, but this is probably 
the biggest crowd we've had. 
there's about 150 people 
here," said John Airhart, 
lead singer of The Calm 
Before. "We're gonna try to 
hold a show here once a 
month, and we'd like to get 
more college students out 
here." 

For a list of upcoming local 
shows, or if you have a local 
band and would like to play 
at the Limestone Fireball's 
next show. visit 

myspace.com/calmbefore. 



MiyiiiiBHmiMtiiaiiiinflmmmyiiiiBiiima 

'Madagascar' roars 
into Clarion University 

UAB presented the film "Madagascar" Sept. 15-18 in 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room. Chris Rock, Ben Stiller, 
David Schwimmer and Jada Pinkett Smith star in the 
Dreamworks ("Shrek." "Shark Tale") production as Marty 
the zebra, Alex the lion. Melman the giraffe and Gloria 
the hippo. The not-so-foarsome foursome reside happily 
in the Central Park Zoo, performing and showing their 
stuff for wooed audiences. Marty dreams of "the wild," 
while the others enjoy the pampered hfe at the zoo. After 
a few mishaps, the group winds up stranded on an island 
they think is the San Diego Zoo. Thi.s is not the case, and 
the friendship of Marty and Alex is tested when some 
"primal" instincts take over. 

As is the case with other Dreamworks films such as 
"Shrek." "Madagascar" is not just for the kids. With refer- 
ences to films such as "American Beauty" and "Planet of 
the Apes," the film can generate laughs from both chil- 
dren and adults. Although derivative of other recent ani- 
mated children's movies, "Madagascar" is a fun film 
about friendship that the whole family can enjoy. 

STEVE TRICHTINGER 



Qood & RahdoiH 

On the evening of Sun.. Sept. 18, television's brightest 
stars hit the red carpet in Hollywood for the 57 Annual 
Prime Time Emmy Awards. The women were glammed 
up in their famous designer dresses, while the men sport- 
ed their overpriced Armani suits with the bling to match. 

The event began with an 

Emmys: 

more than award show 



Kimberly Cammuso 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



actual video shown to the 
audience of actors talking 
about what the Emmys 
meant to them and how 
these awards played a 
significant role in their 
everyday lives. Six-time 

Emmy Award winner 

Billy Crystal said, "I look at my Emmy every morning on 
my way to work and it just reminds me of who I am and 
what I came from and all the people I've worked with that 
made all this possible. It just humbles me and there's no 
other feeling like it." 

The show then opened with a collaboration performance 
by the Black-Eyed Peas and Earth, Wind & Fire. 
Together, these groups sang their own version of the song, 
"September," by incorporating the names of Emmy nomi- 
nees into this comical tune, and closely interacted with 
the audience by pulling celebrities out of their seats to 
dance. It was a good way to lift the crowd's spirits and 
make the ceremony a more enjoyable event. 

Comedian, talk show host and actress Ellen 
DeGeneres,hosted the awards. She brought side-splitting 
wit to the show saying, "Personally, I love TV. but people 
call it the idiot box. Well, if we didn't have television, how 
could we be watching a show honoring people who make 
television on television if there was no 
television.,.. idiots." DeGeneres had many jokes, which 
proceeded to hold the audiences attention. Though, on a 
more serious note, DeGeneres briefly mentioned that 
many of the stars participating in the Emmys wore white 
magnolia flowers pinned to their tuxedos and gowns to 
support the victims of hurricane Katrina and tried to 
raise money for extensive relief efforts. Television's stars 
also paid tribute to the departed news anchors of the 
major U.S. networks. Veteran NBC anchor Tom Brokaw 
and his CBS counterpart Dan Rather received a standing 
ovation at the U.S television industry's top honors as a 
picture of ABC's Peter Jennings, who died last month 
from lung cancer at age 67 was displayed on a large 
screen behind them. There undoubtedly was an amount 
of sensitivity in the air when these subjects were brought 
up, but the show still went on freely as planned. 

Top winners of the evening included "Everybody Loves 
Raymond," which won for best comedy series. Brad 
Garrett won best supporting actor in a comedy series for 
the show, and Doris Roberts won for best supporting 
actress in a comedy series. "The Daily Show with Jon 
Stewart" was another big winner Sunday night. It won 
for best writing, variety, music, or comedy program. 

As usual in an awards ceremony, there were many 
suprises, predictions and expectations, but no one can 
really predict the actual outcome of an event such as the 
Emmys. It is obvious though, that the actors and actress- 
es involved in such an organization, work extremely hard 
at what they do to entertain all their fans. This year's 
Emmy Awards sent a good message to viewers worldwide. 
It was a reality check, that behind all the glitz and glam- 
our' of Hollywood, most of these ever-so-popular television 
stars are good-hearted people who would do almost any- 
thing when it comes to the well being of their country at 
this time of need. 



M*Bir»"'* 



f)um\ 



81322, 2 miles East Of CiariNi 



OEUCiaiSlcif-a* 
aMHBTP 



814754-5327 



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Pages 



Tffi CLARION CALL 



September 22. 2005 



ClmiM 



iri'i'k \k Tnivrl. Emplipenl, Fur Rent, Pmiinah, anil GrniTal Ids 



GREEKS 



Hope pvpryonc had a good 

recruitment! 

•Love AZ 

Happy Birthday Walker. 
Maria, Jenna and Endler! 
•Love, Your AZ Sisters 

Congratulations to our 
Sisters of the Week: Lauren. 
Candee and »Iess! Great job 
at everything! 
■Love, A0E 

Congrats to the Shlubby of 
the Week, Dan Goughler! 
■KAP 

Congrats to the KAP Brother 
of the Week. Eric Hand! 
•KAP 

Special shout out to the 
cheerleaders and the dance 
team for their help last 
week! 
■KAP 

Congratulations Erica on 
being Sister of the Week! 
-AIT 



FOR RENT 



541 Railroad Street. 3 stu- 
dents looking for roommate 
for 5 bedroom house. $1100 
a semester. Call Brandon at 
724 4486279. 

APARTMENTS for 3 4 peo 
pie and HOUSES for 4 7 
people available for the Fall 
2006/Spring 2007 semes 
ters. (-iet a great place for 
next year! Call Barb at 814- 
226 0757 or 814-379-9721 
for more info. 

ROLL OUT OF BED AND 
GO TO CLASS! Houses and 
apartments next to campus. 
See them at www.grayand- 
company.net or call FREE 
Gray and Co 877562- 1020. 

TRAVEL 



Low prices guaranteed. Free 
Meals and Free Drinks. 
Book 11 people, get the 12th 
trip free! Group discounts 
for 6-^ 

www.SpringBreakDiscounts 
.com or 



www. LeisureTours.coni 
800-838-8202. 



or 



Spring Break 2006 with 
Student Travel Services to 
Jamaica. Mexico, Bahamas 
and Florida. Are you con- 
nected? Sell Trips, Earn 
Cash and Travel Free! Call 
for group discounts. 
Info/Reservations 800-648- 
4849 www.stsi ravel.com. 

EMPLOYMENT 



Physically handicapped fac- 
ulty member needs assis- 
tance in swimming once or 
twice a week. Will pay $12 
per se.ssion. Contact Dr. 
Lynn Smith at 226-6675 or 
e-mail lsmith("*clarion.edu. 

Local business seeks com- 
puter programmer for E- 
commerce project. Excel and 
Front Page a must. E-mail 
Charlie at centurymfg@all- 
tel.net. 

PERSONALS 



Tom, 

Happy 21st birthday! You're 



gonna yack! 

-The Call Staff (translaticm 

by -Jamie) 

Meghan. 

(ret me a n(>w feath(M'. I hid 
the old one in the litter l)ox. 
■Love. Dusty 

Paul, 

If you give me your cold, the 
price of admission will be 
raised to $2,500. 
Love. Jamie 

Paul, 

That is five Amish chicks. 

-Mel 

Hot Toddy, 

ILY & T4BAP0ML 

XOXO 

■9 Ashley miss ya 

Nicole. 

The list keeps growing. 

Working on your X-mas gift. 

Love va! 

-Ash"^ 

EMP 
Luv you! 
Boynes 

CRU Servant Team ■ 
Janine. Lauren, Ashley, and 



Huss (in spirit), 
I am so blessed to be work- 
ing with all of you and to be 
a part of it all. To the entire 
Campus Crusade family- 
Ivet's set this catnpus on fire 
for Jesus and let the Lord 
work through us to change 
Uves! 
-Ash A. 

Em. 

Chic-aaannn! 

■Dan 

.Xcjuaman, 

The boys and 1 have been 

talking and we've realized 

that you don't have any 

decent super powers. We're 

revoking your JlJ\ status. 

Sorry. 

-The Justice League of 

America 

Tay. 

How's Alex doing? What 

state is Georgia next to? 

What continent is North 

and South Korea on? Would 

you like some steak? 

-Dan 

Liz, 

FLOGGING MONKIES!!! 

(Keep thinking up those 



ideas.) 
Lurv. Shasta and Kristen 

Hawk, 

I got your back (or butt). 
Love. Shadow 

Mike, 

There's an Oreo in your 

bed... YOU go to bed! 

■ Dusty 

Chris, 

You make a really hot Urkel. 

- Dusty 

Chelsey, 

Oh no you didn't. 
Du.sty 

SWF seeking SWM. Hey 
Snuffface, how do you like 
them apples. 
■Ashtrayhead 

Come on Mel, hit me hard. 
■Tina 

J Money, 

1 can't wait to see you this 

weekend. 

■Love, T-Money 

P-Money, 
I love you. 
-T-Money 



Clarion County United Way 5K Race October 1 

The United Way of Clarion County will hold its 21st Annual 5K Race on Saturday, October 1 as part of an Autumn Leaf 
Festival Event. The course stretches from Main Street, through the Autumn Leaf Festival area, around Clarion 
University Campus, and ending with a lap around the University track. Long sleeved t-shirts, boxed lunches from 
Sheetz, beverages from Wal-Mart and fruit from the Clarion Fruit Company will be provided for the first 200 registered 
runners. Cash prizes totaling up to $1200 will be awarded to the top three male and female runners. Medals will also 
be awarded in the different age groups. Registration will begin at 7:30 a.m. at the stadium. The race begins at 9 a.m. 
and the cost is $15.00. Special discounts are being offered to families/individuals/friends/co-workers running together. If 
an organization, family, etc. has three individuals or more respresenting the cost is only $12.00 per runner. 
Anyone is able to participate, and all proceeds will benefit the Fitzgerald Ramp Project. For more information contact 
the Clarion United Way at (814) 226-8760 or unitedway@usachoice.net and include your full name and mailing address. 



Place a Classified! 

Classifications include: 

Greeks 

For Kent 

Employment 

Travel 

Personals 

General 

and special sections during events such as holidays. 

Cost is only 10 cents per word. Minimun ad cost $1. 




ChRI.STY BAllMCiARTMER 

Junior, Si cx>ndary Ed. Scibnci-. 

"Shakira, because she is a great entertainer, 
and I like to watch her dance." 



Call on You 



by Jenna Angelas 



"Who is your favorite icon and why?" 




Chuis Pauks 

Junior, Communication 

"Dave Chappelle, because he is funny and 
pushes TV over the line." 




Jkrnei. Ha.ssan 
Junior, Business Manaqi-mknt 

"Denzel Washington, because he has roles 
on and off film." 



Omar Johnson 

JuNUjR, Rkal Estate 

"Omar Epps, because he's that dude." 



PIZZ/l 



liPAJQHiK 



V7SA 



MasterCard! 



unsnuini: 

Sunday -Thursday Haiti-lam 
Friday-Saturday llaiii-3am 



814-223-4010 



WElCOMi 
BACK CU 

Students! 



r 2 Medium One Ti-ExtralCarJeirr' 
■ Topping Pizzas ■! i --Topping " 



SI. 39 for additional toppinqs 



u 








Expires 5/15/06^ 



0km 



|MaktB«tllUlllfiES tar mly $2,001 Expires 5/15/06 

r 



I 





IS5S 



Expires 5/15/06- 






ALL THE TIME!!! 





fPlus Tax 



Expires 5/15/06 — Additional Toppings 1.59 



September 22. 2005 



Tffi CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



Sfiris 



Scores 



Events 



Intramurals 




larion 
Scoreboard 



Cross Country 

Sept. 10 

@ Thiel 

W: 1 of 12; M: 1 of 9 

Sept. 16 

@ Slippery Rock 
W: 19-39, W; 
M: 42-19, L 

Football 

Aug. 26 

@ West Chester 

14-43 L 

Sept. 3 
Kutztown 
29-23, W (40T) 

Sept. 17 
Mansfield 
15-12, W 

Golf 

Sept 9-10 

@ Ohio Valley Invite 

4th of 16 

Sept 18-19 
Hal Hansen Invite 
( @ Clarion Oaks) 
3rd of 18 

Soccer 

Sept. 7 

@ Seton Hill 

0-2, L 



Sept. 13 

@ Lock Haven 

0-1, L 

Sept. 16 
California 
2-3, L (2 OT) 



Sept. 19 
Indiana 
0-4, L 

Tennis 

Sept 2 
@NJIT 
6-1, W 

Sept. 3 

@ Georgian Court 

6-3, W 

Sept. 10 
St. Vincent 
7-2, W 

Sept. 15 

@ West Liberty 

4-5, L 

Sept. 17 
Bloomsburg 
1-8, L 

VoUeyball 

Aug. 30 
Daemen 
3-1, W 



Sept. 2-3 
@ Capital 
Tournament 
Hiram 
1-3, L 

Centre 
3-0, W 

Heidelberg 
LO-3 

Ohio Dominican 
3-2, W 

Sept. 4 

Georgian Court 
3-0, W 

Sept. 6 
Gannon 
3-0, W 

Sept. 7 
Seton Hill 
3-0, W 

Sept. 13 
Slippery Rock 
1-3, L 

Sept. 17 
@ California 
0-3, L 

Sept. 20 
@ Indiana 
1-3, L 



CU at Athletic Events 



Cross Country 

Sept. 24 

@ St. Vincent 

Oct.l 

Clarion United Way Invite 

Football 

Sept. 24 

@ Califormia 

Oct.l 

@ Edinboro 

Golf 

Sept. 26 

@ Bearcat Invitational 



Oct. 2 

@ W&J Invitational 

Soccer 

Sept. 23 
Gannon 

Sept. 27 
Slippery Rock 

Oct. 1 
@ Indiana 

Tennis 

Sept. 23-25 

@ ITA Eastern Regional 



Sept. 29 
Grove City 

Sept. 30 

@ East Stroudsburg 

Oct. 1 
@ Niagra 

Volleyball 

Sept. 23-24 

@ East Stroudsburg 

Sept. 27 Edinboro 

Sept. 30- Oct. 1 
Holiday Inn Classic 







^ y|««%t to B-com* «.^ 




gtiideut^ Xt^}=^**ther Aj^i^^ii^^t Rape 




/ 



/ 



Con\e join vis 

5:00 on Tuesdays 
207 Harvey Hall 

393-2720 



F«;)r iwtus? intv»r«ii»ti*>« ci»ntact 
Tll«f women .s study cciit'er nt 393-2720 







■"^pt "> 






9/22/05 



YW'iT^iai A lUWYTlD EL T lUrVTIIirfil 

JIJN A MMmJMXmJ MnJHLJLd IMJCmxmSI 

Doug Knepp (nlranmral, Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393-1667 




9/22/05 



^Tall into Fitness^^ program 

Beginning Thursday. 9/22 at 4pni 
The Rec Center, Intramurals, and the Health Center 
are teaming up to provide students an opportunity to 
join a 12 week fitness program at the Rec Center 
Interested students should call Darlene Hartle @ 393- 
2121 (nurse at the Health Center) to Khduk a 
meeting She will do initial weight, calculate goal 
weight, provide information on diet and nutrition, 
check blood pressure and answer questions This 
meeting can be individual or with a friend. 

5 j\ Klin 

SaturdavVlO/1 10:00 am. 

'^SponR)red by the United Way*', The Intramural 
office will reimbufse half the entty fee for any 
student that participates in this race. For more 
info - stop by the Rec ( ■enter or Tippm Qyni 

Outdoor Soccer Results 



Tuesday, 9/20 




Team No. 1 Internationals 


44 


Team No. 2 Raging Rhinos 


F 


Ktoida\. 9/19 




The Crushers Brew Crew 


F 


The Internationals Team No 1 


34 


Ultimate Frisbee Results 





\,m 



Gaucs 
ROC 



Glass Box 
Average ioe'i 



14 



' j f t ji ^ sfU ^j ii i iSii Sij i S f rit } !^^ 



4 person GOLF SCRAMBLE 

Thursday, 9/22 or Monday, 9I2() 
Clmon (kks Country Club 

Register your team at the Rec center, then call the 
course at 226-8888 to resei"ve a tee time. This is an 1 8 
hole best ball scramble Students golf for V2 price- $8.50 
(Cart not included and you must follow course policies ) 
To qualify for the prize you must turn your completed 
icorecard into the Intramural office by Wednesday, 
10/28 by noon, In case of a tie, a scorecard plaYofl^vili 
be used 

Volleyball Results 

Tuesday. <)/20 

Seny Women Delta Zeta 21-16. 27-25 

BethMudrey TBA's 2I-I7J5-2K2I-II 

TeamRT Don't Cha's 21-10,21-18 

Roofers 21-8,21-7 

Megan H 21-8,21-7 

Incredibles 16-21,21-17,21-11 

Dodgeball Results 

IMIIIIIWMIIIllWMWIIWMMiwitM l l lll l l W J lir M I H I I II 

Tuesday. 9/20 and Monday. 9/19 

Second to Hone NADS 

X-Ballaz 
KDR 
NADS 
Ek Baliaz 
KDR 
Ex Baiiaz 



I he Liprs 
The Outsider! 



Trash Monkevs 
S W Suftiage 
Second to None 
Trash Monkeys 
S W Suffrage 
Second to None 
Trash Monkeys 
S H Waffle Irons 



KDR 



2-0 
2-0 
2-0 
2-0 
2-0 
2-0 
2-0 
2-1 
2-0 



isamaima^ssaeia^ii 



Flag Football Results 

»tMIM>» u aMW<BiwWll W.11 )|I MM^ l |ll\WlWW ll J^ 

rticsdii\.9/2() 

Quick 6 
No Ma'am 
Lady Canes 
Boondock Saints 
The Beers 
Schlitz's 
The Heat 
Second To None 



Sieelers 
Just Ball 
Primetime 
NUPHIES 
Hard Muffins 
Da HuStlaz 
Bench Press This 
Free Bailer's 



Dude's W C. Stop BallzDeep 



KDR 



St. I 



34-31 

42-6 

44-30 

41-29 

37-22 

27-6 

35-28 

F 

42-36 

33-27 




(Flag Football action at Memorial Field) 




^^^^^^^ 



^^^•i 



Page 10 



Sfirts 



Tm CLARION CALL 



September 22. 2005 



Tilij: FNtiill MnIi III Smtr ralli li IP 



Eagles 



in 15-12 thriller at Memorial Stadium 



Ryan Cornman 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rclcornman@clarion.edu 

This past Saturday the 
Golden Eagles drove the 
Family Day crowd into a 
frenzy when Clarion fresh- 
man running back Dave 
Murzynski scored on a one- 
yard run with only 22 sec- 
onds left in the game, to 
rally the Golden Eagles past 
Mansfield by a 15-12 score. 
Getting to that point was 
a struggle, while trailing 12- 
7. Clarion defensive back 
Dwaon Woodard blocked a 
36-yard field goal attempt 
by Mansfield's Sean Hair 
with 2:05 left in the fourth 
quarter which was recov- 
ered by teammate James 
Charles at the Mansfield 30. 
Clarion drove 70-yards in 
12 plays to score the game- 
winning touchdown. During 
the drive. Quarterback 
Brandon Dando completed 
three of six passes for 43- 
yards. 

The game's scoring opened 
early in the second quarter 
when specials teams turned 
up big for the Golden 
Eagles. 

James Charles blocked a 
punt deep in Mountaineers 
territory allowing Zach 
Gourley to pick up the loose 
ball and run toward the goal 
line, only to fumble to his 
awaiting teammate Matt 
Morris. The Clarion score 
put them up 7-0 with 




16 times for 78 yards and 
one touchdown. 

Mansfield was lead by run- 
ning back Ernest 
"Poohbear" McNeal who 
rushed 27 times for 129 
yards and caught three 
passes for 30 yards. 

With the win Clarion 
boosts its overall record to 
2-1, while Mansfield drops 
to 0-3. 

Clarion opens PSAC-West 
play at California next 
Saturday night at 6 p.m. 

They return home to 
Memorial Stadium again 
Oct. 8 at 2 p.m. for their 
homecoming game versus 
the East Stroudsburg 
Warriors which will coincide 
with Autumn Leaf Festival 
activities. 



Photo courtesy of John Thompson 

Golden Eagles fly high over 'Mouritah'-eers - Golden Eagles line up for a 24 yard field goal in their Saturday night win over 
Mansfield University. 



around eight minutes left 
in the first half 

Mansfield roared back the 
third quarter when John 
Hengehold, quaterback, hit 
wideout Ozzie Mathis with a 
30-yard pass for the score. 
The PAT was blocked by 
Woodard allowing Clarion to 



remain on top 7-6 early in 
the third. 

Mansfield took the lead 
with 8:07 left in the game 
when Hengehold hit Tyrone 
Robinson over the middle, 
and he took the play 46- 
yards for the touchdown. 
The two-point conversion 



failed as Mansfield led 12-7, 
setting up the dramatic end- 
ing. 

Clarion ended the game 
with 378 yards of total 
offense including 137 rush- 
ing and 241 passing. 

Quarterback Brandon 
Dando hit on 21 of 41 passes 



for 241 yards while backup 
Eric Yonish, saw limited 
time and rushed two times 
for 17 yards. Reciever 
Michael Byrd grabbed seven 
passes for 76 yards, while 
Tony Easterling had 6 catch- 
es for 87 yards. Freshman 
sensation Murzynski rushed 



Game Notes 

■Clarion was just 1-of- 
6 in scoring inside the 
red zone. 

■The Golden Eagles 
amassed over 100 
yards in penalties for 
the first time this 
season. 

■Mansfield has lost 
seven straight regular 
season games dating 
back to last season. 



Sports feature: 



Baseball transfer praises Clarion 



Josh Woods 
Sports Editor 

sjlwoodsl@clarion.edu 



Senior right-handed pitch- 
er and journeyman Dustin 
Minarchick transferred to 
Clarion University to play 
baseball. 

Minarchick, a native of 
West Decatur and graduate 
of Philipsburg-Osceola Area 
High School, spent time as a 
relief pitcher at Allegany 
Community College of 
Maryland and at West 
Virginia State University. 

Today, he can be found at 
his third college in four 
years, where he hopes to 
earn a spot on the Golden 
Eagle roster. 

Minarchick, who saw lots 
of action in the first two 
years of his college career at 
Allegany, put up good num- 
bers out of the bullpen. 

In fact, he finished his 
sophomore season with a 4- 
4 mark, a 2.71 ERA and 
recorded a most impressive 



12 saves on his way to 
receiving "relief pitcher of 
the year" honors. 

"Allegany is only a two 
year school so I had to go 
somewhere else to complete 
my degree," said Minarchick 
of his first of two transfers, 
"West Virginia State offered 
me a scholarship so I decid- 
ed to try things out there." 

Upon transferring to 
WVSU Minarchick found 
his college baseball experi- 
ence suddenly dishearten- 
ing. With a gamut of top- 
notch pitchers, WVSU pro- 
vided nothing but tough 
competition for playing 
time. As luck would have it, 
Minarchick, who despite 
putting forth an outstand- 
ing effort, was given little or 
no playing time. 

"I just love the game and I 
want to play," said 
Minarchick. After one full 
season at WVSU it was time 
to move on. Where would he 
go? 

The decision was an easy 
one for Minarchick. Before 




TTie Clarion Call file photo 

Batters uip - Golden Eagle oaseball team practices in April. Last 
season CU v^on the PSAC-West and look to better that mark in 
the 2006 season. 



he ever set foot on a college 
baseball diamond he had 
been in contact with Clarion 
manager Scott Feldman 
about playing baseball for 
the Golden Eagles. The 
choice was clear: it was 
time to call Coach Feldman. 
After a few lengthy discus- 
sions, the decision became 
final and the necessary 
paperwork was completed. 

"Coach Feldman has been 
great, he helps us improve, 
sticks to the basics and he's 
not afraid to be one on one 
with his players and tell 
them what they are doing 
right or wrong," said 
Minarchick. 

To this point Minarchick 
has been at every Golden 
Eagle baseball practice 
doing lots of running; a 
reminder of his glory days in 
high school cross country, 
and plenty of other condi- 
tioning. 

He has also been working 
on preparing for the upcom- 
ing spring season at the 
teams' 25 allotted fall prac- 
tices, where players take 
part in intrasquad contests 
to work on their pitching, 
hitting and fielding. 

"I really enjoy being here. 
It's a relaxed atmosphere 
and I like my teammates. 
It's a lot different than West 
Virginia State; there was a 
lot more pressure put on you 
there than there is here," he 
said. 

The team is not the only 
thing Minarchick likes here. 

"People here are more 
sociable and the students 
treat you with respect," 
Minarchick said. "I thought 
it would be tough, since it 



was my senior year and I 
was transferring, but I've 
found it's not hard to make 
friends here." 

Minarchick has enjoyed 
his educational experience 
at Clarion University. Citing 
smaller class sizes and the 
interpersonal communica- 
tion each professor provides 
to the students, Minarchick 
said he's impressed by the 
dedication to students. 

"The professors are easy to 
talk to and they are all more 
than willing to help you 
out," Minarchick said. 

In addition to the students 
and faculty, Minarchick has 
also grown to love the food. 
"People think I'm crazy, but 
I'm telling you Chandler 
food is awesome and so is 
Gemmell food; it's a lot bet- 
ter than West Virginia State 
food," Minarchick said. 

All in all it's safe to say 
that this Golden Eagles 
experience at Clarion has 
truly been "golden," and he 
has yet to play in an actual 
game. 

However, the regular sea- 
son is still a semester away, 
so Minarchick won't have to 
wait long. 

The annual Clarion 
University baseball alumni 
game is set for this 
Saturday at 11 a.m. 

"I'm excited; it'll be fun to 
finally get to play in a game 
against someone other than 
my teammates. It'll be fun 
to play against the team's 
former members," said 
Minarchick, "I'd like to see 
everyone come out and sup- 
port us, the more people 
that come out to watch the 
more fun it will be." 



Clarion soccer 
falls to iUP, 4-0 



Chris McKissick 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_cjmckissick@clarion.edu 

The Lady Eagles lost to 
IUP on Monday by the score 
of 4-0, downing their record 
to 1-8 overall and 0-4 in the 
PSAC. 

The Lady Eagles out shot 
IUP 7-3 in the first 25 min- 
utes. IUP scored on their 
first three shots and this 
reflects what Coach Nina 
Alonzo is feeling about her 
team, "It's just a matter of 
finishing our shots. We just 
need that one spark, that 
one opportunity to create 
wins." 

The season statistics show 
what the coach is talking 
about. Clarion has 98 shots 
on goal with only five goals. 

However, their opponents 
have taken 101 shots and 
have 25 goals. The Eagle 
women are also committing 
less fouls then their oppo- 
nents by the margin of 80- 
69. 

Coach Alonzo is pleased 
with how her players are 
playing, "The girls are play- 
ing hard, playing solid 
defense, and they are 
attacking much better. The 
breaks just aren't falling for 
us." 

Assistant coach Andy 



Swift coached the Lady 
Eagles on Monday due to 
Coach Alonzo receiving a 
red card against Cal in a 
double overtime loss on 
Friday. 

A red card is an ejection 
from the game. 

"Andy did a fantastic job 
coaching the girls," Coach 
Alonzo said. 

When asked about the red 
card, Coach Alonzo felt that 
the officials took away the 
game. 

The statistics make a com- 
pelling argument. Clarion 
had 20 fouls to Cal's 7. 

"I was taking a stand for 
the team. I don't believe we 
were given an opportunity 
to win that game." 

It was her first ejection 
from a game in her five 
years here at Clarion. 

The Lady Eagles take on 
Gannon this Friday at 2:30 
here at Clarion. Gannon 
enters the match with a 3-3- 
1 record. 

"It will be a very even 
match. If we can find a way 
to finish and get up on them 
early we'll be in good 
shape," Coach Alonzo said. 

The Golden Eagles will 
look for their second win of 
the season Friday as they 
host Gannon at Memorial 
Stadium. JCick off for the 
game is slated for 2:30 p.m. 



Attention sports fans! 

Want to write for The Clarion Call? 

Contact: 

Josh Woods, Sports Editor 

393-2380 



Local farmers market |^ 

see Features page 7 1^~^ 
One copy free 




Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 




Extreme Air 

see Entertainment page 8 




NCALL 



Volume 91 Issue 4 September 29, 2005 




Los Angeles Times - 

Washingto n Post News Service 

HI. Gov. corruption trial 
I CHICAGO — Former 
^Illinois Gov. George H. 
Ryan's corruption trial got 
under way Wednesday, 
with federal prosecutors 
painting him as an arro- 
gant politician who lived 
extravagantly and blithe- 
ly doled out millions of 
taxpayer dollars to his 
friends and family. 
"George Ryan lived large 
... and the money flowed," 
Assistant U.S. Attorney 
Zachary Fardon told the 
jury during his 90-minute 
opening statement. 

Saddam's Legal Team Is 
in Disarray 
I BAGHDAD, Iraq — 
"Three weeks before he is 
due to stand trial for mur- 
der, Saddam Hussein's 
defense is in turmoil. 
|: His attorney has asked 
for a delay in the proceed- 
ings. The deposed Iraqi 
president's defense team 
has been impaired by dif- 
ferences over strategy, 
limited access to their 
client, and an internal 
shake-up that recently 
stripped four of its five 
members of their authori- 
ty to represent him before 
the Iraqi High Criminal 
Court. 

Suicide Blast Balls Nine 
Afghan Soldiers 
KABUL, Afghanistan - A 
suicide bomber wearing 
Ian army uniform detonat- 
fed a motorcycle packed 
with explosives near 
Afghan troops boarding 
minibuses outside their 
base in Kabul on 
Wednesday afternoon, 
killing nine men and 
injuring 28, Afghan 
authorities and witnesses 
pBaid. 

p\. purported spokesman 

*ifbr the Taliban militia, 

Abdul Latif Hakimi, 

claimed that a Kabul resi- 

Ident named Mullah 

|Sardar Mohammad had 

carried out the attack on 

behalf of the insurgency. 

Gen. Mohammed Zahir 

Azimi, a spokesman for 

the Ministry of Defense, 

said authorities were still 

investigating who was 

behind the blast, one of 

the deadliest since 2001. 

Energy Supply Concerns 
Elevate 

WASHINGTON 
Gasoline and natural gas 
prices soared on the 
futures markets 

Wednesday as traders 
grew concerned that ener- 
gy operations damaged by 
hurricanes Rita and 
Katrina could be hobbled 
longer than expected. 
Analysts said that if 
futures prices remain at 
elevated levels, national 
pump prices for a gallon of 
regular could move above 
$3 a gallon, as they did 
following Hurricane 

Katrina. They added that 
a run-up in natural gas 
prices likely will mean 
increases for winter heat- 
ing bills. 



Vega, others speak at Katrina candlelight vigil 




above: John Santa/TTie Clarion Call right: courtesy of John Thompson 

Operation Clarion Cares - Above, members of the University 
community gather last evening for a vigil to show support fpr 
those affected by Hurricane Katrina. Professor Dr. Tony Vega 
has several family members who live in New Orleans now stay- 
ing with him. Pictured at right are Gina Beard, Vega's sister, 
and Samantha Beard, his neice. 




Lindsay Grystar 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJlgrystar®clarion.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 28 - Operation Clarion 
Cares hosted a candlelight vigil at the 
bell tower, in support of those affected by 
Hurricane Katrina, yesterday. 

The vigil was Clarion's way of showing 
support for those affected by the hurri- 
cane, and was hosted by Operation 
Clarion Cares. Jessica Bayer and Cody 
Ressel were the student presenters of 
the evening. The ceremony started at the 
bell tower outside the library, where the 
speakers were presented. 

Stephanie Marlow, a 20 year volunteer 
with the Red Cross, was the first speak- 
er of the evening. New Orleans was her 
nth assignment for the Red Cross, and 
she was in Baton Rouge for three weeks. 

"1 was asked by our regional manager 
to speak on behalf of the Red Cross and 
volunteerism," said Marlow. 

See CANDLELIGHT VIGIL page 3 



Some concerned French language major in danger after cuts 



John Santa 
News Editor 

sJmsanta@clarion.edu 



CLARION. Sept. 22 - "Are 
the goals of the university to 
make money and attract 
students or is it to give the 
best education possible to 
the students?" 

This question posed by Dr. 
Vince Spina, chair of the 
Department of Modern 
Languages and Cultures at 
Clarion University, is one 
that according to Spina 
should be an echoed senti- 
ment throughout the entire 
Clarion University commu- 
nity due to the $2.6 million 
budget cuts handed down by 
the Clarion administration. 
"I don't think this is a 
Clarion problem. This is a 



problem throughout the 
country at this point, that 
everything right now is the 
bottom line ~ how much 
money are you making," 
said Spina, "Universities 
aren't here to make money! 
universities are here to edu- 
cate stj^^^nts who will even- 
tualty taKe**S'vef"^d lead 
the country." 

The bottom line for Dr. 
Spina and his department is 
that some cuts have been 
made that, in Spina's opin- 
ion, will make "lots of prob- 
lems in maintaining profes- 
sors and a major" 
The modern languages and 
cultures department oper- 
ates on an ordinary fiduci- 
ary basis with seven full- 
time professors and usually 
two-part time professors, 




Dr-^VincenrSiDina 



according to Spina. After 
the university-wide budget 
cuts, the department is left 
with five full-time profes- 
sors to teach the course load 
it provides. 

There is also another pro- 
fessor that is facilitating an 
online course, but Spina 
noted the money to pay this 
professor's salary comes 
from the distance education 
budget. 



According to Dr Linda 
Nolan, provost and academ- 
ic vice president, "Yes, we 
are undergoing budget 
reductions, and no, I do not 
believe our instruction is 
suffering in quality. Our 
faculty and staff have used 
their creative ideas and 
technology resources to pro- 
vide our students with an 
exemplary educational 
experience. Yes, we are 
being challenged financially, 
but we are using our faculty, 
staff and financial resources 
more effectively." 

"At this point we have one 
French professor, one 
German professor and three 
Spanish professors," said 
Spina, "We have a German 
minor, and you can't do 
more than a minor with one 



professor You can't do a 
major with one professor 
Factually, we will have lots 
of problems; what we will 
have major problems in is 
maintaining professors and 
a [French] major because we 
only have one professor 
teaching French." 

According to Dr 
Grunenwald, president of 
Clarion University, the rea- 
sons for the changes in some 
university departments are 
not as cut and dry. "In gen- 
eral terms, the 
Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education has 
been consistently under 
funded by the office of the 
governor and the legislature 
for a number of years. This 
is compounded by the fact 

See LANGUAGES page 3 



White's bill aims to prevent 
price gouging at tiie pump 



Jeffry Richards 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJpnchards@clarion.edu 

HARRISBURG, Sept. 21-In 
the wake of this year's hur- 
ricane season, Bill 450 was 
passed by Pennsylvania 
senate, prohibiting price 
gouging during or immedi- 
ately after a state of disaster 
emergency. The bill was 
proposed by State Senator 
Mary Jo White with cooper- 
ation from the state attor- 
ney general's office. The bill 
was passed on Sept. 21 
immediately. 

White, Pennsylvania 21st 
district (which includes the 
counties of Clarion, Forest, 
Warren and parts of Butler 
and Erie counties), first pro- 
posed the bill in the after- 
math of the Sept. 11 terror- 
ist attacks and then again in 
2003. Hurricane Katrina 
and the sudden increase in 
gas prices have brought 
more attention to the bill. 

Attorney General Tom 
Corbett was asked for 
some input to the bill 
and showed much sup- 
port. Senate Bill 450 pro- 
hibits "unconscionably 
excessive" pricing during 



a state of disaster emer- 
gency, or 30 days after. 
State of disaster emergen- 
cies include results of a 
nautural disaster such as 
Katrina, labor strikes, acts 
of terrorism and other 
events. 

"Does the price shock the 
conscience?" is the question 
that Barbara Petito, Deputy 
Press Secretary, said is 
asked while investigating a 
possible act of price gouging. 
The attorney general's office 
has already begun investi- 
gations under the 
Consumers Protection Law, 
but they are hopeful to see 
Bill 450 pass as law because 
the bill makes it easier to 
enforce and make a case on 
corporations accused of 
price gouging. Petito also 
stated that "the bill gave 
consistency throughout the 
state," because they have a 
guideline to follow. 

In the bill price gouging is 
defined as an increase in 
prices by at least 20 pecent 
over the average price in a 
chain of distribution. 
Corbett will investigate any 
cases which seem question- 
able and if charged the cor- 
porations could face up to 
$10,000 in fines, which is 




considerably more severe 
than the punishment is 
under the Consumer 
Protection Law. If investi- 
gations show that the price 
raise is due to additional 
expenses then no charges 
will be made. Currently 
there have been about 500 
spot checks and about two 
dozen subpoenas, but no 
charges, according to the 
attorney general's office. 
Petito says they are anxious 
to see the bill pass as law in 
order to protect consumers. 
The bill is not to "scare" 
businesses, but the attorney 
general's office will also not 
let anyone get away with 
price gouging as easy as 
before. Any instances of 
price gouging can be report- 
ed to the attorney general's 
office. 



Clarion County recognized 
as good iiome for youtii 



Beth Kibler 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s eakibler@clarion.eclu 



CLARION, Sept. 26-The 
America's Promise Alliance 
named Clarion County one 
of the "100 Best 
Communities for Young 
People." The announcement 
was made to the public on 
Sept. 26 at 4 p.m. at a news 
conference held in the 
Clarion-Limestone 
Elementary School gym. 

Students, parents and 
administration of Clarion- 
Limestone Elementary, 
along with county leaders 
and other members of the 
community, gathered to cel- 
ebrate the county's great 
accomplishment. 

A number of leaders from 
the community spoke about 
how and why Clarion 
County was chosen as an 
excellent community for 
young people. 

Patty Anderson of the Penn 
State Cooperative 

Extension explained that, 
"We are doing tremendous 
things with our youth in 
this county." The America's 
Promise Alliance chose 
Clarion County as one of the 
"100 Best" because of these 
"tremendous things." 



One program that gives 
youth an advantage is Big 
Brothers/Big Sisters of 
Clarion County. Stan Bevin, 
of Big Brothers/Big Sisters, 
explained how his organiza- 
tion collaborated with the 
county and other programs 
like it. Bevin hopes that 
"this collaboration will con- 
tinue," to help youth in the 
community. 

Another program that 
helped Clarion County 
make the AlUance's list is 
the After Four Club held at 
Clarion-Limestone 
Elementary School. 

Students in the club stay 
after school where they are 
given snacks, helped with 
homework and have tutor- 
ing opportunities. 

College students from 
Clarion University help to 
tutor at Clarion-Limestone. 
Tanesha Pride, Adrian 
White and Jamel Hassan 
are three students from the 
university who are involved 
with tutoring at the After 
Four Club. Pride has been 
tutoring for three years 
while White and Hassan 
have been involved for two. 

These tutors return each 
year because of the fulfill- 
ment they get from their 
work. White believes the 
See 100 BEST page 2 



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Tlffi CLARION CALL 



September 29. 2005 



Kews 

Clarion professors win national videograpliy award 



Julia Perry 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjaperry®clarlon.edu 

CLARION. Sept. 27 - 
Clarion University profes- 
sors Jim Rose of the art 
department and Bill Adams 
of the communication 
department were recently 
presented with The 2005 
Award of Excellence by the 
Videographer Awards organ- 
ization. 

The award which bears 
the resemblance of a clear 
sohd plaque in the form of a 
clapper was awarded to 
Adams and Rose out of 
2,293 entries Adams and 
Rose earned this distinction 
for the documentary they 
created about famed 



American watercolorist 
John Pike. Pike, born in 
Boston, Mass. in 1911, 
received international 

acclaim for his exceptional 
works of art which mostly 
depicted natural scenes. 

"The competition was 
judged on a state of excel- 
lence. Artists whose work 
met the criteria were given 
awards of excellence," said 
Adams. 

Early in 2002, Rose was 
hired by the Pike family to 
do a documentary on John 
Pike, who was the youngest 
artist to become a member 
of the National Academy. 
Rose created the storyboard 
and wrote the entire docu- 
mentary while Adams shot 
parts of the video in Cook 



Forest. It took Rose and 
Adams two years to com- 
plete the film. 

"We had boxes of 
resources, of info. We 
worked very close with the 
family," said Adams. 

Throughout the process. 
Rose and Adams enlisted 
the help of their families as 
well as other Clarion 
University faculty members 
and students. In the film, 
professor Rob BuUington of 
the theatre department does 
the voice of John Pike. 

"Rob heard John Pike's 
voice and got all the inflec- 
tions and did a good job," 
said Rose. 

Young John Pike running 
through the snow in the 
beginning of the film is 



played by Rose's son Joseph. 
The voiceover of young Pike 
was performed by Rose's 
other son James. Rose's 
wife Linda plays Grace 
Callard Pike, John Pike's 
grandmother. 

Art professor Kaersten 
Colvin-Woodruff does the 
role of Betty Moeller, a 
woman from Hawaii, while 
former student Marlon A. 
Lyle plays Jamaican 
Vincent McCormack. Dr. 
Stanton W. Green does voice 
of William Blattner. 

The music was performed 
by John W. Pike Jr., who 
played the piano, and 
Bethany Reynolds, John 
Pike's great granddaughter, 
who played the classical 
pieces. 




Professor Bill Adams 



"When you combine cre- 
ative synergy of a lot of dif- 
ferent people, your creation 
is amazing. The end result 
is award winning. That's a 
thrust in why people pro- 
duce documentary projects, 
to share a message or con- 
tinue someone's legacy," said 
Adams. 

Rose and Adams will pro- 
vide the library with a copy 



Professor Jim Rose 

of the documentary so that 
students can view it. 

"I feel honored that I can 
do a video that memorial- 
ized John Pike because I 
liked his work even before I 
met his family. The way he 
painted and the way he 
lived will always be remem- 
bered," said Rose. 



Golden eagle band gets 
sousaphones 



Katie Fischer 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kcfischer@clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Sept. 28 - 
Buying new sousaphones for 
the Golden Eagles Marching 
Band was the hot topic at 
Monday night's student sen- 
ate meeting. The 
Department of Music had 
put in the request for four 
sousaphones last semester, 
and at the meeting, finally 
had their needs met. 

"It took a year of working 
on this, and planning to get 
this," said Dr. Hubert Toney 
Jr.v the Director of Bands, 
"This is a really good thing 
for the band, it helps for 
band recruitment, it's better 
for the students and it's a 
better sound for the band." 

The marching band's three 
current sousaphones, 

instruments which are simi- 



lar to tubas, have been in 
the department since 1970s, 
and despite repairs they are 
in poor condition. Toney 
said, at the meeting that the 
average life of a sousaphone 
is 15-20 years, making the 
purchase long overdue. 

"It's like working on a com- 
puter that's 10 years old," he 
explained, "it won't print out 
a document in Word, and 
you are constantly making 
repairs to it." 

The total cost of the sousa- 
phones will be $10,917 and 
will come out of the student 
senate's treasury. The 
marching band had initially 
asked for enough money to 
buy four sousaphones, but 
the student senate agreed to 
give them money to buy 
three. It will be about a 
week before the purchase is 
made. 




Senate allocates funds 




Dan Edington 
Managing Editor 

s_dedington@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 28 - 
Monday's student senate 
meeting saw the allocation 
of money for both the stu- 
dent senate and the Golden 
Eagles marching band. 

"We have one computer 
that works and no printer 
that works," said senate vice 
president Cody Ressel. 

Student senate approved a 
motion to request $1,977 to 
purchase a new computer 
and a new printer. 

$1,000 was also allocated 
from the senate's personal 
account to be donated to the 
Hurricane Katrina relief 
fund. 

In addition student senate 
appointed five senators to 
the University Conduct 
Board. 

"It's the representatives 




Melissa Hoiller/rhe Clarion Call 

HEATING UP - Thermometer measures fundraising progress 



for hearings related to dici- 
pline and academic hearings 
on campus," said Ressel, 
who was one of the five vol- 
lunteers. 

Senators were also 
reminded to review and pro- 
vide feedback to the cur- 
riculem changes for faculty 
senate. This year student 
senate is trying to take a 
more active role in review- 
ing curriculum changes. 
"We [student senate] can 



make any comments that we 
want," said Ressel. The sug- 
gestions are then forwarded 
to the Curriculum 

Commitee of faculty senate. 
Review of the curriculum 
changes aren't limited to 
senators. Students may stop 
by the student senate office 
and review the changes 
being made to their field of 
study. 



The Clarion Call provides a synopsis of all criminal 
investigations as conducted by the Clarion University 

Public Safety for the month of September 2005. All 
information can be accessed on the Public Safety Web 

page. 

■ On Sept. 25 an unknown person(s) removed a purse 
from the GM's office in Ralston Hall, without the per- 
mission of the owner. 

■ Michael Gilliland, 40, of Fairmount City, Pa., was 
stopped on Sept. 25 for an equipment violation and 
found to be under the influence of alcohol. 

■ On Sept. 25 campus police investigated a report of 
a simple assault that occurred this date in Wilkinson 
Hall by known actor. Further investigation was 
declined by request of the victim. 

■ Jeffery Rowland, 19, of Bethel Park, Pa., was found 
on Sept. 20 to be in possession of a small amount of 
marijuana. 

■ John Cessna, 19, of Shelocta, Pa., was found out- 
side of Wilkinson Hall on Sept. 20 smoking marijuana 
from a pipe. 



"lOOBESV contfnuetf from 
trontpaie 

best part of his work is the, 
"chance to be a driving force 
— a difference - in a young 
child's life." White 
explained, "I'm not just a 
tutor, I'm a life coach." 

The principal at Clarion- 
Limestone Elementary, 
John Johnson, praised the 
After Four program at the 
news conference. Johnson 
relayed to the audience a 
story about a young student 
who succeeded because of 
the program. Cassandra, 
the student, was failing 
most of her subjects when 
she joined the club. By the 
end of the year, she went 
from failing grades to all A's. 
Johnson feels the After Four 
Club, "is a major part of 
[Clarion-Limestone's] cur- 
riculum." 

The principal also proudly 
stated that Clarion- 
Limestone Elementary had 
a zero retention rate last 
year. "That's unheard of," 
Johnson added. 

Other programs that the 
county sponsors for young 



people include: An ATV 
Safety Fair, Northwest PA 
Healthy Schools Summit, 
Bike Safety Rodeo, 
Parenting Classes, 

Christmas Gift Wrapping 
and more. 

To help conclude the press 
conference, two students 
from the elementary school 
and leaders of Clarion 
County Promise presented 
the three Clarion County 
commissioners with the 
"100 Best" logo the county 
will use for the next year. 

Retired General Colin 
Powell started the America's 
Promise Alhance after the 
President's Summit for 
America's Future in 1997. 
All the living presidents at 
the time held this summit to 
come up with strategies to 
help guide America's youth. 
The Alhance claims every 
child needs, "a caring adult 
or role model in his or her 
life; a safe place to learn and 
grow; a healthy start; an 
opportunity to learn mar- 
ketable skills through effec- 
tive education; and opportu- 
nities to give back through 
community service." These 
five ideas, or Five Promises, 



as the Alliance calls them, 
were the main points upon 
which communities were 
judged for this contest. 

Communities interested in 
participating filled out an 
application at the Alliance's 
Web site. A panel of civic, 
business and nonprofit lead- 
ers, assembled by the 
Alliance, then reviewed 
these applications. From the 
many applicants, only 100 
communities (including 
towns, counties and other 
locally recognized bound- 
aries) were selected. 

Winners of the contest 
receive nation-wide recogni- 
tion as well as a chance to 
participate in a gala that 
will be held Nov. 2 in 
Washington D.C. Winners 
will meet to exchange ideas 
about opportunities and pro- 
grams that help young peo- 
ple in their respective com- 
munities. The hope of the 
Alliance is that this event 
will generate more thought 
and progress in all of the 
communities in attendance. 
Each winning community 
also receives a $2,000 
stipend for traveling costs. 



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Trustees' 

council 

approves 

operating 

budget 

Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_bekoebler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 27 - The 
Clarion University Council 
of Trustees approved a $62.9 
miUion 2005-06 operating 
budget, at a recent meeting 
in Oil City at the Venango 
Campus. 

"This budget would entail 
a cut of $2.4 million in order 
to balance the budget. This 
compares to a cut of $2.6- 
million last year," said Paul 
Bylaska, vice president for 
finance and administration. 
This cut may leave many 
people with questions about 
tuition fluctuation. 

However, tuition is calculat- 
ed by the change in enroll- 
ment each year. Every one- 
percent change in enroll- 
ment increases or decreases 
tuition. Consequently, this 
changes the overall budget 
by approximately $325,000. 
"The budget is based on 
budget guidelines and 
assumptions received from 
the Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher 

Education. The Board of 
Governors of the State 
System sets the tuition for 
all 14 state schools at their 
September meeting, but the 
state appropriation, the tax- 
payer contribution is set by 
legislation each year signed 
by the Governor. For this 
fiscal year then, the tuition 
rate for all universities as 
well as Clarion will increase 
by 2 percent. The 
Appropriation for Clarion 
will decrease by 4.2 percent, 
as you can guess, a primary 
cause of the budget cut," 
said Bylaska. 

In addition, private contri- 
butions for Clarion continue 
to increase. According to 
Harry Tripp, vice president 
of student affairs. Clarion's 
affiliated foundation. 

Clarion University 

Foundation, Inc., provided 
through its endowments 
and private giving $972,370 
in scholarships grants. The 
Clarion University 

Foundation, Inc. also pro- 
vided another $1,147,480 in 
other activities and pro- 
grams such as buildings, 
events, speakers and other 
needed areas for a total sup- 
port of $2,119,850 during 
that twelve month period. 



September 29. 2005 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



Page 3 






'I 



i 



lews 



"LANOUAQES" contfnirad 
from front pag9 



that tuition increases have 
not been large enough to off- 
set the rising costs of the 
university, hence, cuts have 
been made across all univer- 
sity departments." 

This is the first semester 
that these budget cuts have 
been in place, and according 
to Dr. Spina, the numbers 
for student enrollment in 
the Modern Language and 
Cultures Department are 
about the same. The danger 
for the department, accord- 
ing to Spina, begins with a 
"student population that 
doesn't know the reason 
why they should study a 
language." 

According to Dr. Nolan, 
responsibility for resolving 
problems institued with 
these budget cuts may fall 
back onto the faculty. 
"Departments which grow 
in majors will have the best 
chance of receiving faculty 
lines. Faculty members can 
assist their department by 



being actively engaged in 
the strategic planning 
process. During this 

process, faculty can work 
within their colleges to 
determine the best organi- 
zational structure for their 
departments and partnering 
with other departments to 
provide a curriculum which 
will attract more students," 
she said. 

"They [CU students] don't 
understand what the possi- 
bilities are in having a lan- 
guage major. When they 
enroll here they don't enroll 
to study a language. They 
only begin to study a lan- 
guage when they are in our 
classrooms and we can show 
them," said Spina, "all of my 
students get a job in their 
field in the first semester, 
every single one. This is my 
nineteenth year; two or 
three students haven't got- 
ten jobs within their first 
semester, so the jobs are out 
there. Students don't know 
about that." 

According to Spina, "What 
we are complaining about is 
the fact that while they are 



cutting faculty, they have 
plans to build new buildings 
and Reinhard Villages went 
up and what we are told is 
that that money is ear- 
marked; that comes from 
the state. So we have to buy 
that." 

"As for the nature of "ear- 
marked" funds, we are 
restricted to use certain 
funds like state capital 
funds, external funds from 
private giving or auxiliary 
funds only for the specific 
purpose for which they are 
raised. We do not have the 
freedom to redirect those 
funds into our basic educa- 
tional and general budget," 
said Grunenwald. 

The problem with this rea- 
soning, according to Spina, 
is that there are weaknesses 
on both the part of the facul- 
ty and the administration. 
"We don't protest against it 
and the problem with the 
administration... from what 
I can see, is that I don't 
know to what extent they 
are lobbying Harrisburg to 
change the earmark." 

"We are not a business," 



said Nolan, "but we are 
entrusted with public funds 
to use them efficiently and 
wisely to serve the sons and 
daughters of the 

Commonwealth of 

Pennsylvania. If we have 
limited resources, it is our 
responsibility to direct those 
resources to where they are 
needed to make sure our 
students will graduate in a 



...all of my students 
gets job in their field 
in the first semester, 
every single one... 

- Dr. Vince Spina 



timely manner." 

Dr. Spina is not positive 
that the university adminis- 
tration is taking the best 
course of action to alleviate 
the stressed budgetary situ- 
ation at Clarion. Spina 
pointed out that Clarion 



University uses a "model" in 
deahng with its academic 
departments which stipu- 
lates that if student enroll- 
ment is down, then courses 
and faculty are dropped. 

In departments such as 
Physics and the Modern 
Languages and Cultures 
Department, student enroll- 
ment is always low because 
the curriculum is especially 
challenging, but the admin- 
istration must be able to 
make sacrifices in order for 
the departments to be able 
to operate within an accept- 
able capacity. In the case of 
physics. Spina said, "The 
university takes a hit when 
it teaches physics but socie- 
ty gains. We can't do with- 
out our scientists." 

"So we are using this 
model right now. Clarion is 
really big into this and other 
universities are coming 
right along," said Spina, "it 
doesn't work like that; you 
offer the course even if you 
take a loss. You can't run 
this the way you run a busi- 
ness. We are not a busi- 
ness." 



'i^ANDLEUQHTVKilL'' 
oofitfnifad from front pag9 



"It's really important for 
people to be aware of the 
tragedy. As a community, 
we should be able to come 
together to raise our goal of 
$10,000. Hopefully, we will 
be able to exceed that," said 
Bayer, a member of UAB 
and Clarion Cares. 

Dr Tony Vega, another 
speaker of the evening, is 
originally from New Orleans 
and still has family in the 
area. 

"There has been amazing 
support for the hurricane 
and my family from the 



Clarion area. It has restored 
my fate in people, it isn't 
their issue but they are still 
showing great support." 

Following the speakers, 
students walked from the 
bell tower to the rotunda 
outside Gemmell, where the 
Lift Ever>rVbice gospel choir 
performed, and Tricia 
McCall, member of the Red 
Cross, explained things that 
are being done for the hurri- 
cane and how students can 
help. 

Ressel, member of the stu- 
dent senate and Clarion 
Cares, said, "This is a great 
way to unite with all of 
those who have been affect- 
ed by the hurricane, and a 
great way to kick off Clarion 



Cares' fundraising effort." 

Various clubs and activi- 
ties came out to show their 
support, including many 
sororities and sports teams. 

Victoria Sentz, member of 
Sigma Sigma Sigma, said, 
"One of our sorority sisters 
is in New Orleans, and all of 
her belongings were ruined. 
We are here to support her." 

Whitney Ragan, a teenag- 
er from Mississippi that lost 
everything in the hurricane, 
reflects on Clarion's efforts. 
"Those affected from the 
hurricane really appreciate 
that Pennsylvania cares, 
especially at a time like this 
when it seems like the rest 
of the world has already for- 
gotten." 




photo courtesty of John Thompson 
GREEKS REMEMBER VICTIMS OF KATRINA - Various mem- 
bers of Clarion University RSOs (^aij]e togetlier for a candle- 
iight vigil to honor those who fell victiom to Hurricane 
Katrina. The vigil culminated with a fashion show to raise 
funds funds for the "Clarion Cares" organization. 



CampusFest committee holds "brainstorming" meeting 



Jeannette Good 

Copy and Design Editor 

sjmgood@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 27 - 
Christopher Hall, 

CampusFest chair of the 
University Activities Board, 
held a preliminary 
CampusFest meeting on 
Sept. 27 at 9 p.m. in 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
Room to brainstorm band 
ideas for spring 2006. 

Meredith Boldizar, UAB 
president, also attended and 
wrote the names of suggest- 
ed bands. About 100 stu- 
dents showed up in response 
to Hall's e-mail sent to all 
student accounts, and they 
gave input as to bands they 
would like to see. Hall plans 
to do an online survey some- 



time soon to further deter- 
mine which bands interest 
students more. 

This meeting was to brain- 
storm performer ideas in the 
categories of urban, rock 
and country. Suggestions 
included Weezer, Green Day, 
Toby Keith, Foo Fighters, 
John Legend and Dave 
Matthews Band. The rock 
and country lists were 
longer than urban lists. 
Students may e-mail Hall 
with more suggestions. 

Hall will then take those 
suggestions and research 
them. These bands will then 
be taken to the financial 
board made up of student 
senate, UAB, PSA, Lee 
Krull, Harry Tripp and Jeff 
Waple. "They [financial 
board] want the biggest 



bang for their buck," Hall 
said. He continued to 
explain that the goal is to 
not lose money on 
CampusFest. 

"We're going to try to get 
the best band for the best 
amount of money. We're 
going to do the best we can 
to please as many people on 
campus as we can," Hall 
said. Hall also made it clear 
that they know it is impossi- 
ble to make everyone happy. 

Instead of having artists of 
all genres and multiple 
nights of CampusFest, this 
year is aiming toward one 
night with one performer, 
with over $100, 000 allotted. 
"We're just trying different 
ways to do this. If this does- 
n't work out this year, then 
we're all for changing 



CampusFest [in the 
future]," Boldizar said. 

"We're looking right now 
for the best way for 
CampusFest to work," Hall 
said. 

Some students did express 
concern about a lack of an 
urban performer, at the 
meeting. They felt it was 
unfair that CampusFest 
2005 ended up without an 
urban performer, and this 
year it is planned to be only 
one performer. According to 
Hall, the UAB and 
CampusFest committee did 
want Jadakiss to come. 
Byron Trice called approxi- 
mately two hours before the 
doors were to open for the 
show to say Jadakiss would 
not be performing. 

Regardless of whether the 



CampusFest performer is 
urban in genre, a step show 
is scheduled in late April as 
part of the multicultural 
committee. 

According to Hall and 
Boldizar, the funds for 
CampusFest are completely 
separate from the other 
funds in UAB. Boldizar 
stressed that however Mike 
McDonald, concert chair, 
spends money for smaller 
performers has no impact on 
the genre or funding of 
CampusFest. 

Currently, McDonald is 
looking toward having a 
small fall performance with 
either Staind or the Poverty 
Neck Hillbillies. The UAB 
concert committee meets on 
Mondays at 9 p.m. in the 
Gemmell Rotunda. 



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Indictment 
ends Delay 
era In 
congress 

Jeffrey H. Birnbaum and 
Dana Milbank 

Los Angeles Times - 

Washington Post News Service 

WASHINGTON, Sept. 28- 
The indictment Wednesday 
of Tom DeLay ended at least 
for now the reign of the most 
powerful leader the House 
of Representatives has seen 
in decades. 

Love him or hate him and 
pretty much everybody did 
one or the other DeLay was 
the man who, more than 
Newt Gingrich, Dick Armey 
or Dennis Hastert, consoli- 
dated the gains of the 
Republican Revolution of 
1994 and institutionalized 
an enduring Republican 
majority in the Congress. 

DeLay never became 
speaker himself and his 
indictment Wednesday in 
Texas makes it increasingly 
unlikely that he will reach 
his goal of succeeding 
Hastert but in practice he 
ran the legislative agenda 
on Capitol Hill for the better 
part of a decade. 

In opposition during the 
Clinton administration, he 
was a pivotal figure in the 
"Contract With America," 
and high-profile battles over 
health care, budgets and 
impeachment. During the 
Bush administration, he 
was responsible for the lock- 
step discipline in the House 
that passed Bush's agenda 
and forced action in a wob- 
bly Senate. 

"Tom DeLay is an histori- 
cally giant figure in the 
ascendancy to power of the 
Republican Party for the 
last quarter of the 20th cen- 
tury and into the 21st centu- 
ry," said former Republican 
congressman Bill Paxon, 
now a lobbyist. "If you look 
back at virtually everything 
we've accomplished, he's 
been vital to that success." 

Democrats grudgingly 
agree. "He's easily the most 
powerful Republican on 
Capitol Hill, and nobody's in 
his weight class," said 
Democratic strategist Jim 
Jordan. ''He exerts the kind 
of discipline that hasn't 
been seen in decades." 

Indicted by a Democratic 
district attorney in Texas, 
DeLay Wednesday said he 
was the victim of "blatant 
political partisanship" a 
complaint that echoed the 
protests of Bill Clinton and 
other DeLay foes when their 
ethical lapses were turned 
into major scandal by 
DeLay's personal, bare- 
knuckled brand of politics. 

"This is an old story that 
keeps repeating: the people 
who are way out there and 
pushing the limits of power, 
they eventually are pushed 
out themselves," said James 
Thurber, a political science 
professor at American 
University. "Jim Wright and 
Newt Gingrich did that and 
they went. Now Tom DeLay. 
It was just a matter of time." 
His network of former 
staffers among lobbyists 
and in the world of fundrais- 
ing was so extensive that it 
earned the nickname DeLay 
Inc. His people started sev- 
eral all-Republican lobbying 
firms, populated dozens of 
others and were the engine 
of a huge multimillion dollar 
fundraising machine that 
helped keep Republicans in 
the majority. 



- — 



^m 



Page 4 



l/im 



Ttffi CLARION CALL 



September 29. 2005 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex, Clarion, PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

Web: clarloncall.clarion.edu E-mail; call@clarion.edu 

Executive Board 



Tom McMeekIn, 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dan Edington, 
Managing Editor 

John Santa, 
News Editor 

Ashley E. Angle, 
Features Editor 

Josh Woods, 
Sports Editor 

Jeannette Good, 
Copy & Design Editor 



Melissa Hollier, 
Photography Editor 

Jamie Flanagan, 
Business Manager 

Chelsey Hummel, 
Ad Sales Manager 

Ashley Boynes, 
Advertising Designer 

Tina Sickler, 
On-line Editor 

Paul Anderson, 
Circulation Manager 



Staff 

Lorie Abraham. Ryan Aloia, Ambri Alexander, Jennifer 
Angelos. Michael Balchin, Kerri Ballina, David Banks, Adam 
Bauer. Eddie Baumcratz. Jason Bice, Elisa Borger, Eric 
Bowser, Kurt Boyd, Brandi Brady, Katie Bullers. Daniel 
Burr. Kimberly Cammuso, Ashley Carter, Tyler Crissman, 
Jonathan Cofer, Kevin Colonna, Ryan Cornman, Lisa 
Covington, Brandon Devennie, Hilary Dieter, Jonathan 
Donelli, Jeffrey Donston, Jonathan Egbert, Lori Elmquist, 
Katie Fischer, Audrey Fiske, Danielle Gais, Shawn Glancy, 
Lindsay Grystar. Grant Herrnberger. Chris Hofer, Robyn 
Holz. Sara Hoover. Andy Johnson, Jennifer Kalgren, Emma 
Kelly, Beth Kibler, Brittnee Koebler, Jason Kooser, Shasta 
Kurtz. Joe Kuszaj, Lauren Macek. Michael Marcello, Chris 
McKissick, Nicole Meyer, Heather Moore, Megan Mullins, 
Cheyenne Patterson, Mollie Pifer, Morris Pratt, Elizabeth 
Presutti, Gayathri Rajendran, Zach Ramsey, Stephanie 
Rawson, Ryan Rhoades, Jeffry Richards, Sarah Roesch, 
Roberta Rosati, Lisa Sagan, Lindsay Schnieder, Jared 
Sheatz. Vicki Sheeler, Jennifer Shetter, Melody Simpson, 
Nathan Stahlman, Kristen Staley, Darrell Stanyard, Marc 
Steigerwald, Tom Steinhagen, Lindsay Sturgeon, Kirwin 
Sutherland, Matt Topolski, Steve Trichtinger, Ariel Weaver, 
Kevin Wetter, Pam Wherry, Amber White, Jimi Wikander, 
Ryan Wolfe, Devon Yorkshire. Jessica Zelinsky 

Policies 

The Clarion Cidl is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communi- 
ties. The Call is published most Thursdays during the aca- 
demic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but 
reserve the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctua- 
tion, and obscenity; the determination of which is the respon- 
sibility of the Editor-in-Chief. 

Opinions expressed in this paper are those of the writer or 
speaker, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the 
newspaper staff, student body, Clarion University or the 
community. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact informa- 
tion. They must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If 
the author of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they 
must attach a separate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only 
based on available space and at the discretion of the 
Executive Board. Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-cui-ricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-cur- 
ricular when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill 
their responsibilities for the entire semester will be granted 
a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. 
One copy is free; additional copies are $1.00. 




The Native American V-Day participant. Tantoo Cardinal said, "IVIy mother 
died when a man punched her in the heart and broke the protective sac 
around her heart. It's like a metaphor..." 

Vaginas Wanted! 

Auditions for the Clarion University production of Eve Ensler's 



The Vagina Monologues 



Men. Oct. 16 - 5:30 to 9 p.m. 
lues. Oct 17 - 2 to 5 p.m. 
Thurs. Oct 19 - 2 to 5 p.m. 

209 Harvey Hall Women's Studies Center 

Previous sign-ups for auditions required in 209 Harvey Hall. 

Cold read no prepared monologue needed. 



Age, nothing but a number 



Ashley Boynes 
Advertising Designer 

s^arnboynesSclarionedu 

Age truly is nothing but a 
number. I say this because, 
over time, I have learned 
that substance and maturi- 
ty is what makes a person 
who they are. Common 
traits, trust, loyalty and a 
strong bond are what can 
make a friendship or rela- 
tionship work; not how old 
someone is. 

I am turning 22 years old 
this week and feel that I am 
mature for my age. I some- 
times find I cannot relate to 
people my own age, because, 
some individuals seem to be 
stuck in middle school. Then 
again, one of my dearest 
friends is my younger broth- 
er's girlfriend, who is only 
16. 1 also have a good friend 
who just turned 21 and is, 
married with a daughter, 
and on the other hand, 
friends who swear not to 
marry until they are at least 
30. It is really quite odd how 
eclectic the maturity levels 
of people in a certain age 
range can be. I have always 
gravitated to older guys and 
can carry on a conversation, 



with my parents' friends or 
high school students equal- 
ly- 

I wonder why people say, 
"act your age." What does a 
22 year old act like? At 22 
years old, I feel my age. 
However, on a recent online 
test to discover my "true" 
age, I scored 28. My broth- 
er's girlfriend, subsequently, 
scored 26 which is probably 
why we get along so well. 
My mom also scored 28 
which is probably why, at 
times, we butt heads. So 
maybe I act 28. But then 
again, 1 collect Barbie dolls 
(only mint-in-box collector 
dolls... NO I don't "play" 
with them), and will openly 
admit to loving Britney 
Spears. So, am I immature 
for those things? I am sort of 
a homebody at times, gener- 
ally hsten to more "adult" 
music like rock or country, 
and do not hke to date 
around; 1 prefer serious 
relationships. So, in those 
senses, am I now escalated 
b«^k up to 28? Or do the 
Barbies/Britney and the 
serious boyfriend/serious 
music equalize me to make 
me "act 22?" 
Age is truly nothing but a 




number, and this 
can be seen by 
attending a 
high school 
football 
game. At a 
recent 
game of my 
brother's, I 
was 

amazed at how much older 
some of these high school 
girls look than me. Tbday, I 
got carded for buying a lot- 
tery ticket. Apparently, I do 
not even look 18, but some 
of these high school girls 
look to be in their late 20*8! 
And, as sad as it is, many of 
them probably have "been 
there, done that" with many 
experiences (i.e. drug use, 
sexual experiences) as, say, 
a 25 year old. It amazes and 
appalls me! The peculiar 
thing is, teenagers 50 years 
ago were much more 
demure in those situations, 
but were more adult as far 
as dating went, and married 
a lot earlier, too. It was not 
uncommon for someone to 
marry at 19 or 20, yet nowa- 
days most women marry 
between the ages of 24-30, 
at the earliest. So, is acting 
like a 22 year old now the 



same as acting 
like a 22 year 
old in 1955? 
It doesn't 
seem so, 
but then 
again, 
how does a 
normal 22 
year old 
"act"? 

And someone, please tell 
me how to act my age? I go 
to bars and clubs, but 1 am 
"over" the huge, wild party 
scene. Is this normal for a 
22 year old? Is caring about 
more than just gossip and 
boys odd? Am I beyond my 
years? I find many people 
my own age immature, but 
maybe something is wrong 
with ME? I don't think so. I 
think a person's character 
and personality determine 
who they are, and age is just 
a labeling factor. Who cares 
how old someone is? I like 
people for who they are, and 
not how old they are. You 
can be 22 and act 17, and 
that's fine, that is your busi- 
ness. Or, you can be 17 and 
act 22. Or, somehow, you 
could be 22, and act 22.... if 
you can figure out what, 
exactly, that means. 



Response to 'Have fun 
at home' column 

In the Sept. 15 edition of 
The Clarion Call, Jason Bice 
authored a column that was 
critical of students who 
choose to go home on Week- 
ends. In articulating rea- 
sons to stay in -Clarion over 
the weekend, Bice suggeets 
that male students "looking 
for some action" simply find 
"some drunk girl" who 
would be "more than willing 
to help [them] out." Bice 
also refers to "luring" 
women to his apartment 
with the "promise" of a good 
time. 

I find Bice's column offen' 
sive and inflammatory in 
that it promotes the objecti- 
fication and exploitation of 
women. More disturbing, 
however, is Bice's statement 
later in the column that it 
would be "a good lesson" to a 
woman who later regrets 
the encounter once the 
influence of alcohol is no 
longer present. Bice's posi- 
tion seems to be that having 
sex with a woman who is too 
intoxicated to give informed 
consent is an acceptable 
way to behave. Perhaps the 
easiest reaction is to simply 
condemn the column and its 
author as being blatantly 
sexist and boorish. Looking 
beyond obvious inferences, 
however, the column pro- 
vides an interesting learn- 
ing opportunity for all stu- 
dents about the importance 
of responsible behavior and 
respect for all members of 
the university community. 

While a university experi- 
ence offers young women 
many rewards, unfortunate- 
ly, there are also significant 
dangers, and one of these 
dangers is men who are sex- 
ually aggressive. One of the 
greatest challenges in sexu- 
al assault prevention educa- 
tion is combating miscon- 
ceptions that being the vic- 
tim of unwanted sexual 
intrusions "can't happen to 
me." Jason Bice's column 
furthers an attitude that 
freshman women are objects 
to "score" upon and that 
deception and exploitation 
are acceptable practices. 
Bice's column should serve 
as a caution to all students 



about how a night of party- 
•' ing can lead to an unwanted 
sexual encounter that can 
have life-long emotional 
scars. 

Friends and bystanders 
also play an important role 
- in preventing sexual assault 
, by being proactive and 
ii assertive when situations 
! arise , that put women at 
risk. I encourage students 
who witness potential inci- 
' dents of sexual assault, dat- 
ing violence or harassment 
to intervene and help pre- 
vent these situations from 
occurring in 
' the first 

place. 

For as trou- 
blesome as I 
found Bice's 
column, I was 
just as 

pleased to see 
students 
speaking out 
: in several letters to the 
' Editor in the Sept. 22 edi- 
tion of The Call. We cannot 
change those who have 
' predatory views about 
women. However, by speak- 
ing out, we send a clear mes- 
sage as a University com- 
munity that sexually 
aggressive conduct is nei- 
ther tolerated nor accepted 
by students and employees 
at Clarion University. 
' Jason Bice has the right to 
express his opinion in The 
Call. Members of the 
University community have 
an equal right to point out 
the harmfulness that this 
type of inflammatory and 
derogatory language has on 
students and employees of 
Clarion University. 

- David G. Tedjeske, 

Director of Public Safety, 

Project Director of Clarion 

UDiversity^s Violence 

Against Women Project 

Response to 'Get in 
touch with your frat' 
column 

Think back to the first 
moment you arrived on 
Clarion University's cam- 
pus. You are finally at col- 
lege, you are growing up 
and you are becoming the 
person you are going to be 
for the rest of your life. One 




of the first things you do is 
try to find other people like 
yourself, who have common 
interests, goals and 
lifestyles as yourself. There 
are many options for new 
students to take part in. It 
can be writing for The 
Clarion Call, becoming a 
member of the debate team, 
playing a sport on campus 
or one of the other number 
of activities offered at this 
university. The choice I 
made as a new student was 
to become a member of a fra- 
ternity. 

In the 
Sept. 22 edi- 
tion of The 
Clarion Call 
I read an 
article that 
not only 
shocked me, 
it made me 
ashamed to 
be a staff 
writer for this paper. I am 
currently in my final semes- 
ter fulfilling my print co- 
curricular because I am a 
communication major trying 
to move on to the next step 
of my life. 

The article weakly titled 
"Get in touch with your 
inner frat" is the article I 
refer to. It was written by a 
mediocre writer named 
Jason Bice in attempts to 
amuse himself and all of his 
Magic the Gathering bud- 
dies. He goes into detail 
about a fictional fraternity 
named Delta Iota Chi (AIX, 
this is what it should look 
hke), that he states to be so 
much better than all of the 
real fraternities left on this 
campus. He forgot to include 
Delta Iota Kappa (AIK), 
Sigma Alpha Tau Mu 
Epsilon society (ZAT ME) 
and Pi Omicron Tau (nOT). 
See how easy it is to play 
with the Greek alphabet? 

One of my biggest prob- 
lems with the article was 
that this kid has no idea 
what he is talking about. 
The attention-seeking Bice 
states things such as who 
wants to do community 
service? Well, apparently 
the entire Greek system, 
fraternities and sororities 
alike. I just guess Mr. Bice 
doesn't pay attention to the 
countless blood drives put 



on by the Greek community 
every semester, or the food 
drive carried out by the 
Greek system every semes- 
ter. 

The Greek system at this 
University is in a very frag- 
ile state right now. We have 
just changed over to a com- 
pletely different system in 
its first semester of tnal, 
and the last thing we need is 
negative publicity. 

People may say it's just a 
joke; but the parents of stu- 
dents that read these arti- 
cles, along with the students 
themselves will still form 
the opinion that that is 
Greek life at Clarion 
University What this imma- 
ture, supposed writer does- 
n't understand is the power 
of words. Words leave a last- 
ing impression upon all who 
read them. The purpose of 
writing is to inform and to 
entertain. I saw nothing 
entertaining about this arti- 
cle whatsoever. It would be 
like me writing an article of 
slander about the marching 
band and expecting to get no 
reaction from it. 

I have been a member of a 
fraternity for four years 
now. I have made some of 
my best friends who will 
stay with me for a lifetime 
in those four years. Yes, I 
don't get along with all of 
my brothers, but we are like 
a family. In every family you 
have the ones you get along 
with and the ones you fight 
with constantly. Buying 
your friends, you say? The 
only thing you invest your 
money in is loyalty, integri- 
ty, honor, courage and 
becoming a gentleman 
leader of tomorrow. 

Every organization is the 
same on campus. You devel- 
op a family bond that will 
stay with you the rest of 
your life no matter what 
type of group or organiza- 
tion you decide to take part 
in. 

I am currently Vice 
President of Kappa Delta 
Rho (KAP), KDR for those of 
you that can't figure out, 
and I wouldn't trade a day of 
my four years as a member 
back for anything in the 
world. 

-Kurt Boyd, 
student 



September 29. 2005 



Tm CLARION CALL 



Page 5 



I 






We need a freshman ambassador! 



Paul Anderson 
Circulation Manager 

s_pmanclerson®clarion.eclu 

I didn't start writing The 
Dumping Ground until I 
was a sophomore, and so I 
never got to talk and rant 
about freshman stuff 
Actually, until this year, I 
never thought of college in 
terms of freshman, sopho- 
more, junior or senior. I 
thought of myself as what- 
ever level I was but never 
projected it. 

That idea was too high 
school for me. You remem- 
ber high school, right? The 
caste system of grades. The 
senior girls won't date fresh- 
men because that's just 
depressing. However, senior 
boys can date whomever. 
This wasn't true with every- 
one, but let us not lie to our- 
selves" it was true with 
most. The grades didn't 
associate. It was a rare, 
awkward thing, not because 
seniors were more mature 
or anything (hold on, I'm 
laughing my ass off at that 
thought), but because sen- 
iors were just more preten- 



idML 



tious about their station in 
high school life. Lo, I am 
Senior. Bow to me. 

Anyway, I never thought of 
college in the same way. 
Hell, I had classes with the 
other levels. There are the 
groupings of whether or not 
you're legally old enough to 
drink, but that doesn't 
count. 

However, as I end my first 
month as a senior and I 
walk around campus and 
see these little freshlings (a 
term I got from two profes- 
sors and how apt they were) 
scurry about, I can't help 
but think, college is like 
high school. 

This idea is only partially 
true, though. I hold no pre- 
tensions about being a sen- 
ior; the IQ level is not all 
that much higher than the 
freshmen or sophomore 
classes (and, depending on 



The 

Pumping 

.(Ground 



the test subjects, the 
younger ones may be 
smarter). I'm closer to grad- 
uation and that's it. 

But the gulf between, say, 
me, and the average fresh- 
ling is the experience that 
is — drum roll and trum- 
pets — Clarion life. Ta-da! 
Why isn't anyone clapping? 
I was in front of two fresh- 
men at a fast food joint and 
I heard them complaining 
about the lack of anything to 
do in Clarion. They had 
indignation in their voices. 
Seniors complain about the 
same thing, but we're 
resigned to the lack of activ- 
ity. 

And all this got me to 
thinking (because I'm like 
that): we need a Freshman 
Ambassador. We need a 
noble soul from the senior 
class to take the freshlings 
under his or her wing and 



show them the ins and out.s 
of being a college student in 
a town that looks at us with 
contempt (and don't bother 
arguing because you know 
it's true). 

Think of the wealth of 
knowledge a senior has 
about Clarion that he or she 
could bestow upon the 
freshlings. We seniors 
should have seminars about 
the stupid, irrelevant things 
we know! 

Do the freshlings know 
the best times to use the 
dorm bathrooms to avoid 
the utter filth everyone else 
leaves? 

We need an Ambassador. 
We need someone to bridge 
the gulf between seniors 
and freshmen. We will save 
you from meningitis and 
drunken jackasses and fail- 
ing class and throwing up 
Chandler meals (and the 
food was so good during our 
orientations, wasn't it?). We 
will make you veterans of 
Clarion University. 

However, off the top of my 
head, I can think of no one 
worthy of the job. So much 
for that idea. 



My appologies ... sort of 

(doat tkat . . . 



Jason Bice 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJabice@clarion.edu 

Did you ever see the 
Christmas episode of 
"Family Guy?" There's this 
part where Stewie and Peter 
are reenacting the nativity 
scene and Peter says some- 
thing "offensive." 
Responding to this a man in 
the crowd says, "This is out- 
rageous! We have to do 
something about this." 

"But Bob there's nothing 
we can do," responds his 
friend. 

'You're right," says Bob 
after thinking about it. "I 
guess I'll just have to get a 
sense of humor." 

I'm going to apologize 
right now to the two people 
that actually think my col- 
umn is funny. This week I 
was going to write about 
how Joey Gladstone from 
"Full House" was a deadbeat 
mooch, but due to the 
amount of hatred I've been 
receiving lately, I thought I 
should respond to my last 
two articles. 

When I write things I 
write them with one goal in 
mind: to be funny. To do this 
I portray myself as a huge 
jerk and exaggerate things 
to the extreme to ensure my 
readers will get that what I 
write is a joke. It's called 




if 



milk, 



satire. Unfortunately, a 
large number of people 
apparently have trouble 
reading between the lines 
and for some reason have 
taken what I've said as 
truth. 

To be honest, I'm surprised 
how much controversy the 
actual column has caused. I 
first heard that there was 
trouble when a friend of 
mine told me that one of the 
campus' feminist groups 
was upset. Apparently, I'm 
up to my old tricks of objec- 
tifying women. You know, 
saying all they're good for is 
cooking, cleaning and mak- 
ing babies. That's me, 
Chauvinist McGee. 

I don't hate women. I love 
women. My mom is a 
woman, my sisters are 
women, and my best friend 
is a woman. Well, I think 
she is at least. The point is, 
I think girls are the best 
thing on earth, and it's my 
belief that they should be 
entitled to the same things 



men are. 

I also work with all 
women. What do I do? I 
work with at-risk pre- 
kindergarten kids. That's 
right. This big, arrogant, 
woman-hating jerk teaches 
little kids. "I know I'd never 
let him get near my kids." 
(He might just teach them 
to have open minds!) 

I guess the feminists' 
biggest beef was that I was 
condoning date rape. Are 
you serious? If I seriously 
thought rape was OK do you 
think I would actually put it 
in the paper? 

I also seriously doubt that 
a guy reading my article will 
say, "Hey, Jason Bice says 
its ok to go wait outside the 
bar for a drunk girl to take 
advantage of Think I'll go 
do it." 

I wasn't trying to make 
anything factual. I was try- 
ing to be funny. 

I know that not everyone 
was conceived through a 
broken condom, I know not 



all significant others cheat 
on each other, and I know 
it's not acceptable to lure a 
drunk girl to your apart- 
ment. 

I admit I may have been 
wrong. 

My article on fraternities 
was not meant to offend or 
target any fraternity in par- 
ticular. When writing it, I 
tried to make use of the 
stereotypical fraternities 
portrayed in the media and 
in such films as "Animal 
House" and "Old School." I 
thought that this would 
make everyone including 
fraternities laugh, but I was 
wrong. 

Although I don't think 
someone is going to change 
their mind about joining a 
fraternity because of what I 
said, I do apologize for writ- 
ing about something I know 
nothing about. 

Finally, I'd like everyone to 
know that, in general, I'm a 
nice guy. I'm not creepy. I 
apologize to the girls in my 
creative writing class who 
think what I say is stupid 
and annoying. Some people 
laugh, so I must be doing 
something right. 

Anyway, in the future I 
hope my readers will take 
my columns as what they 
are meant to be. In turn, I 
will tone it down a bit. I 
hope you're happy. 




Lisa Covington 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJdcovington@clarion.edu 



Tlie power of "vaginas 
wanted" defined 

For the paat few years, this time of year the university 
community continues to remind me that the titlo frightens 
and infuriates many responses including: "Can't they 
change the name?" " Isn't that porn?" " That's .suppo.sed to 
be private!" These are just a few things that 1 have heard 
from people on campus. The answer is no; changing the 
name would change the message. The name is .staying. The 
issue is not private - it is a rude awakening of what i.s hap- 
pening in our backyards in our 
international community. In our 
home state, one in four girls will 
be sexually assaulted by age 
eighteen, of the college aged vic- 
tims, 90 percent know their 
attacker. If reported the person 
will (usually) spend a few 
months in jail. This is not some- 
thing that 'always happens to 
them', it happens in Clarion, 
"m ^^^^^■■T^ maybe to who you sit next to in 

MlS^^mUff'K^W class. On a larger scale, world- 

wide, one in three women will 
be beaten or raped in their life- 
time. These facts are as real as 

the clothes you have on. 

"The Vagina Monologues," by 
Eve Ensler does not bother me; the facts about the violence 
against half of the population that this performance has 
brought my attention to what I am sharing with you today, 
which is only the "tip of the... iceberg." 

What frightens me is that many of us can not even imag- 
ine what happens outside of our box. Women of all ages in: 
Africa and Asia have had their clitorises removed because 
it 'causes pleasure', Juarez, Mexico they have been missing 
with the numbers continuously rising with very little 
investigation, Kuwait can not vote, Italy can't wear blue 
jeans, Asia (along side their brothers) are being sold as 
toys, the United States can't walk home safely. All of these 
things trouble me and probably bother you, now. 

This show is the only reason that 1 know this informa- 
tion and the "V-Movement" that was born because of the 
show is raising money purely to support efforts where sex 
trafficking, violence. The official site of the movement 
states, "V-Day generates broader attention for the fight to 
stop violence against women and girls, including rape, bat- 
tery, incest, female genital mutilation (FGM) and sexual 
slavery." The non-profit organization created in lieu ot the 
success of the show. Last year alone, V-Day benefits took 
place in over 1,000 cities worldwide including Clarion that 
had over 12,000 people from our community helped raised 
a total of over 100,000! All of which, was donated to PAS- 
SAGES, Inc., SAFE, (Stop Abuse for Everyone) and the V 
•Day Spotlight: Women in Juarez. 
Does the name still bother you? If it does you may not rec- 
ognize the value behind it - it is supposed to get your 
attention, make you wonder what it is about, and inform 
you about the violence going on right before your eyes. If 
you hear people complain about the title even after learn- 
ing more about it, think about the women who benefit from 
this production: for girls in Africa a SAFE house was built 
because of V-Day. These girls are able to now live healthy 
lives without fear of genital mutilation. The 'comfort 
women' from World War II, of the Philippines now have an 
outlet for the abuse they endured as sex slaves. Women 
from both of these countries have been condemned from 
their families and communities because of their 'social dis- 
ruption.' 

Clarion will do its part to help from the university and 
community. This year it will start (again) during our ALF 
season, with men and women raising awareness for this 
worldwide movement more than any time in the six years 
the benefit performance has been on campus. Find resolu- 
tions to become part of this mission: "V-Day is an organ- 
ized response against violence toward women. V-Day is a 
vision: We see a world where women live safely and freely. 
V-Day is a demand: Rape, incest, battery, genital mutila- 
tion and sexual slavery must end now. "V-Day is a process: 
We will work as long as it takes. We will not stop until the 
violence stops. V-Day is a day. We proclaim Valentine's Day 
as V-Day, to celebrate women and end the violence. V-Day 
is a fierce, wild, unstoppable movement and community". 




David Dang 

Senior, Accounting 

"Usher - I'll help fundraise!" 



Call oi You 



by Sara Hoover 

"Who would you like to see perform at 
CampusFest? 




Jared Mlji.cahv 

Senior, Elementary Education 

"Billy Idol because he's my idol." 





Tylina Dow 

Senior, BioLociv 
"Linkin Park, because they're hot." 



Mandy Bi.ackhurst 

Sknior, El. Ed/ Library Science 

"Snoop Dogg - he's my full grown puppy." 




Mike Caracciolo 

Senior, Finance 

"Dashboard Confessional. 



Meghan Furia 

Senior, Sociology 

"Kelly Clarkson." 




^auafti^b^atf 



Page 6 



THE CLARION CALL 



September 29. 2005 



fatms 



'Macaroni at Midnight' chronicles life of hardship, misfortune 



Amber White 

Assistant Features Editor 

"We're going to go back to 
a small community in rural 
North Dakota," were the 
words Dr. Don Bartlette 
used to begin painting his 
story at Hart Chapel on 
Tuesday night. "Macaroni at 
Midnight: Growing Up As A 
Chippewa Indian," 

Bartlette's autobiographical 
profile, has been presented 
internationally and was pre- 
sented here at Clarion as 
part of the Martin Luther 
King, Jr. Speaker Series. 

Bartlette, a Chippewa 
Indian, was born not only an 
ethnic minority but physi- 
cally handicapped as well. 
At birth, he had only half of 
a nose, no upper lip and a 
large hole in the roof of his 
mouth. His father, having 
hoped for a son who would 
grow to be strong and ath- 
letic like him, was so severe- 
ly upset by this that he 
turned to alcohol and even 
became physically abusive 
in later years. The family 
lived in a tiny one-room 
cabin miles away from a 



white community, and if it 
was difficult for them, a 
family of minorities, to inte- 
grate, it was absolutely 
impossible for the young 
boy. A doctor, having grudg- 
ingly come to see the baby, 
told the mother, "send him 
away and let him die." 

His mother was a woman 
who "valued life," and 
refused to consider that her 
child should be treated any 
differently. The community, 
however, wanted nothing to 
do with him. For nine years, 
the young boy wasn't 
allowed anywhere near 
them. In vivid detail, 
Bartlette described how his 
mother would go into the 
community at night and 
steal food so that they might 
live. He then told the audi- 
ence of his discovery of the 
community's dumping 

ground. Seeing that they 
discarded food and clothing, 
he began stealing from it. 
He would stuff the food 
down the hole in his mouth 
and never learned how to 
chew. 

Teachers would not allow 
him to be around other stu- 
dents or attend classes. His 



first teacher picked him up 
from his desk and told the 
class, "I will not have him in 
our room," and locked him 
in the closet. Children 
taunted him, and several 
times went so far as to phys- 
ically abuse him. The police 
were no better, and in one 
incident, two policemen 
physically and sexually 
abused the then 12-year-old 
boy. It was at this point in 
the presentation that 
Bartlette gave a statement 
some found to be the most 
meaningful of the night: "If 
we don't understand the 
child, we may never under- 
stand the adult they 
become." 

Had it not been for the 
compassion of one woman, 
Bartlette's life would have 
turned to delinquency and 
most likely death. The irony 
of the identity of his bene- 
factress was that she was a 
white woman from the com- 
munity that had despised 
him all his life. Taking the 
young boy in, she taught 
him "how to survive in the 
white man's world." He was 
taught how to eat properly, 
how to read and write and 



even how to earn money for 
a living. After doing every- 
thing she could to learn 
about his disability, she 
attempted to teach him to 
speak. 

However, she went even 
beyond that, securing a job 
for Bartlette's father and a 
large house-within the com- 
munityfor his family. It 
was at this point in the story 
that the audience learned 
why the presentation was 
named "Macaroni at 
Midnight." Bartlette went 
home that night, eating a 
meal of hot macaroni, and it 
was at that time that his 
father showed him respect 
for the first time in his life. 
Through this woman's 
compassion, Bartlette was 
able to learn how to speak, 
gain friends at his school 
and graduate as the first 
handicapped Native 

American valedictorian of 
his school. From there, he 
went off to the University of 
North Dakota where he 
faced more prejudice from 
his peers. At that point his 
life turned for the worse 
again, and he became an 
alcoholic in an attempt to 




Jonathan Donelll/rhe Clarion Call 

DR. DAN BARLETTE - Barlette spoke of his hardships as a minori- 
ty and also the trials over having facial deformities. 



hide from his demons. 

It wasn't until roughly 30 
years ago, with the help of 
his wife, that he was able to 
finally start heahng. His 
story has been told around 
the world and is being 
turned into a book and a 
movie. Bartlette will soon be 
appearing on "The Oprah 



Winfrey Show." 

He ended his presentation 
with a challenge to the audi- 
ence, which he expressed in 
a song. "When will a young 
man learn how to learn? The 
answer will come from you." 
The entire room gave him a 
standing ovation. 



Jewelry making proves challenging yet fun 




Lori Elmquist 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

I went to the jewelry mak- 
ing event sponsored by the 
University Activities Board 
(UAB) this past Monday 
evening, which was held in 
248 Gemmell at 8 p.m. I 
actually arrived early and 
had a chance to talk with 
Esteban Brown, sophomore 
theatre major., as the UAB's 
arts chair, he decided to 
change things up a little 
this year by offering craft 
nights. "I thought this 
would be a good idea. I'm 
the arts chair, so why not do 
artsy things," he said. 

I was expecting to walk 
into a structured, instruc- 
tional jewelry making class 
but found myself in a room 
with a wide variety of beads 
and stringing materials 
spread out for people to use 
as they pleased. This 
relaxed atmosphere 

appeared less stressful; 
however I now had to come 
up with my own design. 

The room soon 
filled with both 
guys and 
girls look 
ing for 
ward 
to the 
evening's 
event, which 
was apparent by 
the comments being 
made such as, "I love 
making jewelry," and 
can't wait!" 

There were so many peo- 
ple that some had to sit on 
the floor. Everyone looked 
through the supphes avail- 
able and chose their beads 
and stringing material. 
There were lots of beads to 
choose from - wooden, shell, 



plastic, glass, and all kinds 
of sizes and colors. The 
chatter in the room quieted 
as people were concentrat- 
ing more and more on their 
projects. 

I have been beading for the 
past four years, so I didn't 
plan on having any prob- 
lems. There was a really 
neat multi-colored blue rib- 
bon that I had decided to 
string as a necklace. Well, 
the beads I wanted to use 
were not going to go on that 
ribbon. I spent a good 
amount of time trying, 
believe me! I tried a needle, 
I even bent the needle, and 
some wire, but nothing 
would work. I could have 
gotten different beads, but 
chose to try and learn to 
make a hemp bracelet 
instead. 

Jessica Criswell, a fresh- 
man biology major, has been 
making hemp jewelry for six 
years and was kind enough 
to show anyone who was 
interested how to tie the 
hemp cord. "I fell in love 
with the art. I give them 
[jewelry pieces] away and I 
sell them," she said. 

I had my first demonstra- 
tion and headed back to my 
seat to try the technique 
myself. This was not work- 
ing too well. Although I con- 
sider myself to be crafty, I'm 
not very coordinated when it 
comes to "string 
things" such as 
^^crocheting 
and now 



shoes then they can tie 
hemp jewelry. I chuckled 
out loud and then asked him 
to please help me. Now it 
was junior philosophy major 
Jeremy Swarm's turn to try 
and help me with my 
bracelet. He explained the 
technique in a slightly dif- 
ferent manner, but the idea 
was the same. I still had to 
really think about what I 
was doing and my bracelet 
didn't look very nice. I was 
trying!! 

Every so often, Esteban 
Brown would stop by and 
ask me how things were 



I held up my bracelet and 
looked at my wrist. There 
was no way that bracelet 
was going to fit. What I had 
originally measured to be 
about two inches larger 
than my wrist was now two 
inches shorter! Once again I 
found myself laughing. 

I cleaned up, thanked the 
people that had helped me 
and took a look at some of 
the other items people had 
made. There were some 
really neat things. I saw 
two hemp bracelets, one 
with shell beads and one 
with wooden beads, which 




Morris Pratt/ The Clarion Cal 
Many pieces of jewelry were made, including this beaded, hemp anklet. 




going, and we would both 
end up laughing. What hap- 
pened to my previous jewel- 
ry making experience? No 
one would have ever 
thought I had made any- 
thing before. I glanced to 
my left and the girl beside 
had finished making 



three items, while I still 

struggled with one. Hey, I 

had gotten a couple of 



were fantastic! 

I may not have made a 
viable piece of jewelry, but I 
did learn a new technique, 
though I still need to perfect 
it. I also had fun, laughed a 
lot and talked with some 
neat people. 

Everyone seemed to enjoy 
the project and the relaxed, 
"do- it -yourself atmos- 



m a k 

ing hemp 

jewelry. I kept plugging 

away. 

Okay, I overheard a guy 
beside me telling someone 
that if a person can tie their 



phere, which fostered visit- 
beads tied on, so things ing and making new friends, 
were beginning to look "Yeah, I love it; I've been 
up. using this kind of stuff to 
By 9 p.m. I had final- meet people, because I hve 
tied the last knot on my in Eagle Park and haven't 
hemp bracelet. A lot of the met a lot of people. I met 
participants had left by then two girls tonight," said 
with at least one item if not Alyssa Brown, a freshman 
more. There were still oth- communication major. 
ers that were busy being 
creative. 



askwcW'K^a(j£:e 



Dear Dr. Eagle, 

At the beginning of the month we received an e-mail 
about three attacks by a masked man. I know that they 
captured the man, but I am still worried. Do you have 
any tips on how I can protect myself? 
Signed, 

Afraid of the Dark 

Dear Afraid of the Dark, 

Residence Hall: If you live in the residence hall make 
sure no one follows you inside the building. If you see 

someone sitting outside 
and they look suspicious 
to you, don't hold the 
door open to let them in. 
Shut the door as soon as 
you are inside. If some- 
one knocks on your door 
don't just open it. Use 
the peephole to see who 
it is. If you are located oja 
the bottom level of the 
residence hall, close your 
blinds or drapes to stop 
people from being able to 
see in. 

Off Campus: If you live 
off campus lock your 
doors at all times, draw 
drapes and shades at 
night to avoid letting 
people see into your 
house. Have good out- 
door lighting so you can 
be aware of what is 
going on outside. Lock 
all of the windows in 
your house or apart- 
ment, even on the second floor. Make sure your room- 
mates have a key with them at all times. This way you 
keep the door locked at all times. Don't hide spare keys 
outside of your house. 

Vehicle: When you are walking to your vehicle at night 
have your keys ready. You can use them as a form of self- 
defense if needed. When you are at your car scan the 
area; if everything looks okay, unlock the door. Once you 
get in the car check the floor of the back seat, then lock 
the doors. 

Never walk alone at night: If you are going out make 
sure you are with your friends so you will always have 
someone to be with. If someone does approach you yell 
"Stop." "No," "Get back." This will get the attention of the 
attacker. If the attacker grabs you pull away as soon as 
you can. Once you get away run to the nearest place for 
help. 

Corporal Gregg Smith from Public Safety holds a class 
called Rape Aggression Defense Systems (R.A.D.). You 
can contact him at x2111. 

Doctor Eagle is written by Sarah Wilson, of the Keeling 
Health Center. For more information or to suggest a 
topic, please contact her at s_smwilson@clarion.edu 




» 



r 



September 29. 2005 



THE CLARION CikLL 



Page 7 



Farmers Market offers home grown produce, homemade crafts 



Kurt Boyd 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

On Saturday, Sept. 24 
local residents gathered to 
share their talents as farm- 
ers and craftsmen in the 
park across from the court- 
house in downtown Clarion. 
Between the six vendors 
present that day, everything 
from vegetables, potted 
plants and crafts were avail- 
able. 

Peter Burns, of Lake City, 
Pa., said, "I view it as a fes- 
tival kind of thing." 

All of the products are pri- 
vately farmed, crafted and 
sold. The farmers them- 
selves put on and run the 
farmers market. To sell 
products at the farmers 
market, each seller must 
produce at least 80 percent 
of the products for sale. 

"If it wasn't for us bringing 
our stuff to the market there 
wouldn't be one," said 10 
year veteran Barbara 
Shingledecker of Knox, Pa. 

Started up 20 years ago by 
the Community Support of 



Agriculture (CSA), located 
on Grant Street, this 
Farmers market gives farm- 
ers like Tammy Martin of 
Corsica, Pa., a chance to bet- 
ter distribute her product. 
Her family sells their crops 
alongside the road by their 
home seven days a week. 

"Some have different 
things, some have the same 
thing, if you run out of 
something you can send the 
customer to someone else," 
said Martin on her view of 
this friendly competition 
between farmers. According 
to Martin, the peak season 
for crop selling is between 
the end of July and the 
beginning of September. 

The official name for the 
market is the Clarion 
County Farmers Market 
Association. It originally 
was sponsored by Clarion 
County but is now an inde- 
pendent entity. Permission 
is obtained by writing to the 
county commissioners to 
give them dates and times. 
This grants them the space 
needed to set up the market. 
The Clarion Borough is then 



requested to grant them 
permi.ssion to use all of the 
parking spaces surrounding 
the park. There needs to be 
proof of insurance for the 
locations, and product 
insurance must also be pro- 
vided by the vendors. 

The market is run by a 
board of voting members 
residing in the local Clarion 
Area. The positions they 
have established are the 
president, market manager, 
treasurer, secretary and 
media liaison. The officers 
are elected in the spring 
before the start of the 
farmer's market season. 
The market runs every 
Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 
noon. May 3 through the 
Autumn Leaf Festival every 
year. 

"All of these vendors are 
families or private farmers 
in the surrounding areas, 
working hard to produce the 
best product for the con- 
sumers that they can," said 
Judith Eggleton of Clarion. 




Morris PratV The Clarion Call 

FARMERS MARKET - Vendors set up tables across from the Court House on Saturdays from 8 a.m. 
to noon and offers home grown produce and homemade crafts. 



STAR takes stand against rape 



Ariel Weaver 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Over the last month, 
Clarion may not have felt 
like the safest community to 
walk around, with the mug- 
gings and murder that had 
occurred. One thing that 
may always come to mind is 
the chance of being raped. 

Rape; it is such a scary 
word and an even scarier 
thought. However, rape is 
something that every 
woman or man may think, 
"Oh, it will never happen to 
me," when in reality 1.3 
women are raped every 
minute. That results in 78 
rapes each hour, 1,872 rapes 
each day, 56,160 rapes each 
month and 683,280 rapes 
each year. 

One of the most startling 
aspects of sex crimes is how 
many go unreported. The 
most common reasons given 
by women for not reporting 
these crimes is the belief 
that it is a private or per- 
sonal matter and the fear of 
reprisal from the assailant. 
Rape cannot be kept secret; 
it is as serious as murder. 
Another reason rape goes 
unreported is because many 
women don't even know 
they are being raped. 

On Jan. 6, 2003, The 
California Supreme Court 
created one of the country's 
toughest standards on what 
constitutes rape, ruling that 
if a person withdraws con- 
sent at any point during sex 
but their partner refuses to 
stop, it becomes rape. As of 
2003, Supreme Courts in at 
least five other states have 
made the same ruling. 

College, sadly enough, is 
considered one of the major 
hunting grounds for rape. 
In a national survey 27.7 
percent of college women 
reported a sexual experi- 
ence since the age of 14 that 
met the legal definition of 
rape or attempted rape, and 
7.7 percent of college men 
reported perpetrating 

aggressive behavior which 
met the legal definition of 
rape. 

An overwhelming majority 
of rape service agencies 
believe that public educa- 
tion about rape, and 
expanded counseling and 
advocacy services for rape 



victims, would be effective 
in increasing the willing- 
ness of victims to report 
rapes to the police. Clarion 
University offers this oppor- 
tunity. 

STAR (Students Together 
Against Rape) is a campus 
sponsored organization that 
helps people on campus who 
have either been raped or 
know someone who has and 
may need help. If you are 
someone that has a close 
friend that has been raped, 
STAR is a good organization 
to go to because they pro- 
vide one with answers to 
questions he or she may 
have or offer advice to give 
to the friend. 

Karen Nicodemus, a mem- 
ber of STAR, said, "Friends 
can be helpful, but the best 
help is professional help, so 
we are here to give them the 
right information to give to 
their friend." 

Nicodemus also said that 



STAR may help anyone who 
has been a victim of sexual 
or domestic violence. STAR 
focuses on any sort of 
domestic or sexual violence.; 
Anyone is welcome to ask 
members of STAR for help, 
advice or support. Every 
member has a good basis of 
what to say, including 
women who are trained to 
give professional h^lp. 

After becoming a member 
of STAR, meetings are held 
in order to think of ways to 
reach out to people on cam- 
pus. The group comes up 
with ideas for new posters 
or speeches that will help 
anyone who needs it. STAR 
sponsors Take Back the 
Night, V-day and "The 
Vagina Monologues" and 
Flame to Fire which will be 
held on October 11 at 6 p.m. 
outside of Gemmell. Flame 
to Fire is a mixture of differ- 
ent speakers that talk about 
domestic violence. October 



starts domestic violence 
awareness month. 

Nicodemus said that when 
• looking for speakers to tell 
their stories at these events 
she teams up with the social 
change organizations on 
campus that may know of 
someone good to speak. 

"Many people actually 
come up to me and tell me 
that they want to tell their 
story," she said. 

Flame To Fire is a great 
opportunity not only for the 
speaking victims to get out 
their story but for anyone in 
the audience who may have 
been through the same situ- 
ation. 

STAR, in the past, has 
teamed up with PASSAGES, 
the rape crisis center in 
Clarion, for a more profes- 
sional outlook. 



RAPE PREVENTION GROUPS 

STAR meets every other Tuesday at 5 p.m. in 209 
Harvey Hall. If you are interested in joining you may 
contact the advisors, Dr. Fleischer or Dr. Kennedy in 
Founders Hall, or join the group through iPortal. STAR 
is open to males and females. 

RAPE CRISIS CENTERS 

PASSAGES (814) 226-7273, 800-793-3620 
SAFE (814) 226-8481, 800-922-3039 

RAPE STATISTICS 

■ One out of every three American women will experi- 
ence sexual or domestic violence. 

■ The US has the world's highest rape rate of the coun- 
tries that publish such statistics. It's four times high- 
er than Qermany, 13 times than England, and 20 times 
higher than Japan. 

• One in seven women will be raped by her husband. 

■ 83 percent of rape victims are ages 24 or under. 

■ One in four college women have either been raped or 
suffered attempted rape. 

■ 75 percent of male students and 55 percent of female 
students involved in acquaintance rape had been 
drinking or using drugs. 

■ Only 16 percent of rapes are ever reported to the 
police. 

■ 68 percent of rapes occur between the hours of 6 p.m. 
and 6 a.m. 

■In 29 percecent of rapes, the offender used a weapon. 

■ In America, about 81 percent of rape victims are Cau- 
casian, 18 percent are African American; one percent 
are other races. (Violence against Women, Bureau of 
Justice Statistics, U.S. Dept. of Justice, 1994). 



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Page 8 



Eitertiiuett 



Tiffi CLARION CALL 



September 29. 2005 



Extreme Air makes extreme noise on campus 



Jeannette Good 

Copy and Design Editor 

CLARION. Sept. 28 - "We 
heard a loud noise and did- 



n't know what it was," Kim 
Cowell. sophomore psychol- 
ogy major said, while in line 
with Jessica Reed, sopho- 
more biology major, around 
3 p.m. to try the Extreme 




Melissa Holller/r/ie Clarion Call 
EXTREME EXCITEMENT- Students prepare to enter the Extreme 
Air skydiving simulator outside of the Recreation Center 



Air activity. After a friend 
told them that it was cool, 
they decided to give it a try. 

Extreme Air, skydiving 
simulation, made extreme 
noise outside of the 
Recreation Center on Sept. 
28 between 10 a.m. and 4 
p.m., sponsored by the 
University Activities Board. 

"It's going to get really 
loud soon," Mike Caracciolo, 
recreation chair of the 
University Activities Board, 
said. 

The event was brought 
back to campus because of 
the student participation. 
Caracciolo said, "It's been 
here in the past. A lot of stu- 
dents like it. We're always 
crowded. It's just a popular 
thing for people to do here." 
Students constantly wait- 
ed in line. A small group of 
students had a hacky sack 
circle going to pass the time. 

According to Caracciolo, 
approximately 100 students 
participated in the event. 
Two professionals took 
about six people in the sim- 
ulator every half hour. Each 
person stays in the simula- 
tor for about 30 seconds, but 
Caracciolo said it seems like 
a lot longer. 

"Everybody wants to go 
skydiving without spending 




September 29. 2005 



THE CLARION C JkLL 



Jeannette Good/The Clarion Call 

EXTREME- The Extreme Air machine makes noise outside of the Recreation Center on campus. 



the hundred-and-some dol- 
lars to do it," Caracciolo 
said. This event was free to 
students. 



Everybody wants to 
go skydiving without 
the hundred-and-some 
doilars to do it. 

- Mike Caracciolo, 
DAB recreation chair 



» 



"You don't feel like you're 
going to get hurt or any- 
thing inside it because there 
are two guys in there with 
you," Caracciolo said. 

All participants in 
Extreme Air wore a one- 
piece jump suit, helmet and 
ear plugs, all provided by 
the company. All garments 
worn must be tight. 

According to Caracciolo, 
the two professionals taking 
people into the simulator 
performed a demonstration 
first. They did tricks like 
spinning, flips and going to 



the top of the tent. 

He said that they would 
sometimes spin students, as 
long as the students were 
stable enough. "If you're 
steady and stable enough 
they'll let you do some of the 
little tricks and stuff," he 
said. 

Caracciolo described his 
first-time experience in the 
skydiving stimulater, "You 
feel like you're going to just 
fall right down, and then the 
wind catches you, and your 
cheeks are all puffed out." 



Game night welcomes all students 



I; 



II 



Jon Gofer 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Sept. 22 - 
Sorority Zeta Phi Beta held 
a game night in room 248 in 




X 





the Gemmell Student 

Center from 7^20 p.m. until 

9 p.m. At least 30 people 

showed up at the peak of the 

event, which provided 

games, food, drinks and 

music. 

"Our goal is to have lots of 

people come out. 

Anyone's welcome, not 

just minorities," 

Laquaya Garrett, 

member of Zeta Phi 

Beta, said. Zeta Phi 

Beta is a "minority 

sorority" according 

to Garrett, but 

they aren't trying 

■ to leave anyone 

out. 

"We hope to get 
lots of freshmen to 
come so they can 
make new friends 
and see there's stuff to 
do on campus," she said. 
"I'm enjoying myself," 
Shannon Musgrove, sopho- 
more communication major. 



said, while playing dominos. 
"Everyone's here having a 
good time and meeting peo- 
ple. It's a great chance for 
people to just mess around 
in a relaxed environment 
and wind down for the 
weekend." 

The atmosphere was, in 
fact, very laid back and 
friendly. The music was 
often drowned out by the 
laughter and conversations 
in the room as people played 
games. 

The most popular game 
was Scattergories, which 
had a table packed full of 
students playing and laugh- 



(( 



Our goal is to have 
lots of people come 
out. 

- Laquaya Garrett 
» 



ing. In Scattergories, every- 
one is given a random letter 
to use, and a category list. 



It's a great chance for 
people to just mess 
around in a relaxed 
environment and wind 
down for the weekend. 

- Shannon Musgrove 



Then they fill in the 
columns with words that 
answer the questions from 
the selected category list, 
and that start with the let- 
ter. 

Other popular games 
included Monopoly, Uno, 
Dominos and checkers. 

By 8:45 p.m., the crowd 
had started to thin out, but 



there were still a 
couple of tables of 
students enjoying 
themselves and 
playing games 
until the event 
ended. 

"I think we had 
a good turnout," 
said Yurie 

Fernand, fresh- 
man biology 
major, who 
then talked 
about the 
importance 
of the event. 
"A lot of 
minority 
students 
drop out of 
college 
freshman 

year because they feel like 
they have no resources or 
support, or even people to 
talk to. This is an opportuni- 
ty for everyone to get togeth- 
er and grow while showing 




I- 



sup- 

port for one another." 

Fernand also reinforced 
what Garrett said; every- 
one's invited to come have a 
good time. 



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Transition: a Pittsburgh band 



Steve Trichtinger 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

The kids all wait outsidt'. 
nervousness and excitement 
fills the air. Parents accom- 
pany some of the children 
because of their young ages. 
Tons of kids come out each 
show to see one of their 
favorite music groups. 
Gathered around the stage, 
they wait for their favorite 
songs. Yet. unlike a normal 
show with this number of 
people, this band isn't on 
MTV or Fuse. These guys 
don't have music videos or 
songs on the radio to draw 
the big crowds. Well, not yet 
at least. 

Pittsburgh-based band 
Transition has been paying 
its dues to the musical com- 
munity for years. Transition 
has rocked the pop/punk 
and emo world with their 
current lineup (minus a 
bass player) for two years. 

After extensive touring of 
the east coast, they started 
extending their horizons. 
They had been playing 
shows with bands such as 
Story of the Year, Sugarcult, 
Punchline, Waking Ashland, 
the Juliana Theory, Coheed 
and Cambria, Boys Night 
Out, Mae and Copeland and 
dates on last summers Vans 
Warped Tour for a while. 
Then this past summer, for 
weeks on end, they toured 
cross-country with the 
Warped Tour and on their 
own tour. 

The band also generated a 
wide following using 
Purevolume.com. The 
Purevolume.com Web site is 
a resource many bands use 
to have anyone with 
Internet access play their 
music. They were one of the 
leading unsigned artists on 
the site. Right now 
IVansition has over 264,000 




Photo courtesy of Transition 

TRANSITION - The member of this Pittsburgh-based band play a combination of metal and pop. 



plays. After the surge on 
purevolume.com, the sum- 
mer held some exciting 
news. 

While on tour in California 
their bass player left the 
group to join up with anoth- 
er band called My American 
Heart. Not to worry though, 
in the same week Transition 
signed a record deal with 
California indie rock label 
Floodgate Records (The 
Myriad, Yellow Second, 
Forever Changed). "Signing 
to Floodgate was really 
exciting for us," said gui- 
tarist Steven Biringer about 
the label. "Transition is a 
project that we have been 
working on for a really long 
time. It is awesome that we 
have the opportunity to 
make what we really love 
into a career. It is nice to see 
someone that believes in 
this project as much as we 
do and will help us reach 
our full potential as a band," 
Biringer said about the 
future of the band with 
Floodgate. 

Since being signed, the 
band has released an inde- 
pendently produced, self- 
titled EP. Within only a 



short time the EP has 
already sold 3,000 copies 
with no distribution. 

Clarion University stu- 
dent Ashley Kraskowski is 
familiar with the band's new 
EP. "The new CD is great, 
seeing how they have gotten 
better even since the last 
CD. I can't wait to see what 
will come next," she said. A 
booking agency, Lucky 
Artist Booking, that also 
books bands such as 
Terminal (Tooth and Nail), 
June. 

Transition played their 
CD release show with June, 
a band on Victory Records 
(Hawthorne Heights, 

Siverstien) at Mr. Smalls 
Theatre in Pittsburgh. They 
rocked the building to its 
core. Kids screaming and 
singing along to every word 
of every song. 

Robert Morris University 
junior Dom Denardis went 
to grade school and high 
school with members of the 
band. He said, "Transition 
has evolved into such a phe- 
nomenal group since their 
early years inSth grade 
with original band members 
Jim Caligiuri and Steven 



Biringer. Their hard work 
and dedication has paid off." 
Eli Rebich, vocalist in fel- 
low Pittsburgh based band 
Echo Jade (www.purevol- 
ume.com/echojade) has only 
good things to say about 
Transition. "Being close to 
them for the last 5-6 years, I 
can say that they're the def- 
inition of a hard working 
band. They are so apprecia- 
tive and thankful of their 
fans and modest about their 
success." Vocalist Dan 
Smyers loves the fan base 
they have around the 
Pittsburgh area and across 
the country." There's noth- 
ing better than seeing the 
same face twice. The loyalty 
and devotion of our fans 
keeps us from hanging up 
the cleats," he said. 

Why does Transition have 
such a loyal following? 
Smyers feels that it can be 
summed up easily, "We 
stand somewhere between 
pop in metal. If you want to 
put it simply, we've got 
something for everybody. 

The band is playing a show 
^Oct. 8 at Mr. Small's in 
Millvale, for the Berlin 
Project's farewell show. 



Till death do us part 




Nathan Stahlman 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

"Corpse Bride" 
Director: Tim Burton 
Warner Bros. 
rating:5/5l|n|r!^1$n|k' 



All does not go according to 
plan in Tim Burton's new 
stop- motion animated mas- 
terpiece. 

Victor Van Dort (voiced by 
Johnny Depp), son of a fish 
merchant, is arranged to 
marry Victoria Everglot 
(Emily Watson). This mar- 
riage is meant to raise the 
Van Dort family's social sta- 
tus and pull the Everglots 
from the poor house. 

When Victor, nervous and 
shy, can't remember his 
vows at the wedding 
rehearsal, he does what any 
of us would do. He goes for a 




walk through the woods to 
cool down and practice. 
When he finally gets them 
right, to his surprise, he 
finds himself married to a 
corpse bride (Helena 
Bonham Carter) and living 
in the underworld. Victor 
must now find a way to 
return to the land of the liv- 
ing and save Victoria from 
being forced to marry the 
evil Lord Barkis Bittern 
(Richard E. Grant). 

The only thing I can say 
about this movie is Tim 
Burton has done it again. 
Well, maybe I can say a lit- 
tle more than that. 

I know a lot of people were 
worried that this film was 
going to be too much like 
"Nightmare Before 

Christmas." I wasn't wor- 
ried because I have learned 
never to doubt Tim Burton 
or his creativity. He is one of 
the most original thinkers of 
any filmmakers. His films 
are always very dark, and I 
love dark films. I don't think 
I've ever watched a Tim 
Burton movie that I didn't 
love and you can add this 
one to the list. 

One thing that really 

caught my eye is how much 

brighter and more colorful 

the underworld is compared 

to the living world. "Why 

up there when 

people are dying 

to come down 

here?" 



Victor is asked. I think I 
would stay in the under- 
world, it seemed like a much 



(( 



The only thing I can 
say about this movie 
is Tim Burton has 
done it again. 



)> 



more fun place to be. 

Victor gets a hot dead wife; 
he gets his dead dog back, 
and he no longer has to deal 
with cold society or pushy 
parents and intimidating in- 
laws. This seems like a pret- 
ty sweet deal to me. You'll 
have to watch it to find out 
what Victor chooses. 

This movie, being only an 
hour and 15 minutes long, 
moves rather quickly. The 
musical numbers are also 
very strategically placed. 
You don't really predict 
when the characters are 
going to bust into song, but, 
once they do, it feels so right 
that you want to jump up 
and join them. 

The bottom line is you 
should see this movie. I did- 
n't give it a rating of five for 
no reason. 

I noticed it was only in the 
number two spot coming out 
of the weekend. It should be 
at number one. 

Don't let the PG rating fool 
.you. This film is great 
, entertainment for children 
and adults alike. 




Batman flies in Peirce 

'['he Univer.sity Activities Board sponsored the show- 
ing of "liatman Begins" in Peirce Auditorhim Sept. 22' 
25. Opening in a prison camp in an unidentified nation, 
"Batman Begins" shows Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) 
receiving continuous brutal treatment as a prisoner, as 
part of his research into the nature of evil. He is res- 
cued by the mysterious Henri Ducard (Liam Neeson). 

When Wayne refuses to kill someone as a member- 
ship requirement. Ducard becomes his enemyi the iso- 
lated raillioniare returns to Gotham City determined to 
fight evil, without realizing how much trouble he is in. 

The story of why he identifies with bats (childhood 
trauma) and hates evildoers (he saw his parents killed 
by a mugger) has been referred to many times in the 
various incarnations of the Batman legend, including 
the four previous Batman films. Wayne's character 
seems to be a slow learner, clumsy at times, taking fool- 
ish chances, inventing Batman as he goes along mak- 
ing this movie much more unpredictable. 

KIMBERLY CAMMUSO 

Seniors perform recitals 

Stacie Jo Pawlak, music education major, performed 
her senior flute recital in Hart Chapel on Sept. 24 at 7 
p.m. Pawlak's program included Claude Boilings 
"Suite for Flute and Piano" with Bonnie Ferguson. 
piano, Ben Hull, bass, and William Henry, percussion, 
Emily Malburg, music education major, performed 
her senior clarinet recital in Hart Chapel on Sept. 25 at 
3^15 p.m. She played Jules Moquet's "Solo de 
Concours," Ernesto (iavallini's "Adagio e Tarantella" 
and Carl Maria von Weber's "Concerto No. 2" with 
Janice Grunenwald, piano. 

There is an updated performance list on the music 
department's Web page www.artsci.clarion.edu/music/ 
index.htm, 

JEANNETTE GOOD 



Qocd & Random 

You know when you go in to see a movie, and they 
have that sign up with the big lips and the finger in 
front of it that says "Shhh," or the cell phone with a 
slash through it? I think they need to make these signs 
more clear, because there are a lot of people who either 
can't see the signs or can't understand them. 

I'm the movie reviewer for this newspaper. A couple 
weeks ago, I reviewed "The Exorcism of Emily Rose." 
Through reading my review, you got a little under- 
standing of the plot of the movie and my opinion of the 

movie itself. What yovi 

Shh... really 
means shut up 



Nathan Stahlman 
C/ar/onCa// Staff Writer 



missed out on was the 
experience of watching 
the movie in a crowded 
theater, on opening 
weekend. 

I went to the theater 
early, so I could get a 

good seat. I went alone 

because my friends were either working, or they talk 
too much during the movie for me to get a good enough 
viewing of the movie to accurately review it. 1 sat in 
"the seat," you know, the one right in the middle, about 
half way up the risers. It's the best seat to view a 
movie. There was a herd of kids, probably between the 
ages of 13 and 16, sitting a couple rows down, talking 
and giggling like schoolgirls. I remember thinking, 
"They better shut the hell up when this movie starts." 
Of course I knew in the back of my mind they wouldn't. 
What's even worse is the fact that some of their par- 
ents were in the theater also, apparently chaperoning. 
One woman yelled down to her daughter before the 
movie started and asked why she was sitting next to a 
boy. I thought, "Obviously they can't fool around during 
the movie if they're on opposite ends of the theater, stu- 
pid." My parents would never have done something 
like that to me. 

Then about five minutes before the movie started, a 
group of people came in and noticed that they could fit 
in the same row as me if I moved down a seat. You can 
imagine ray anger when they asked me to move from 
the seat that I had already warmed up. but then I real- 
ized I wasn't in the exact center anyways. I just didn't 
want to have people on both sides of me. So against my 
better judgment, I obliged them and moved down. 

There I was packed into a movie theater chair, sur- 
rounded by strangers, to watch a supposedly scary 
movie. 

The woman beside me was on her cell phone until half 
way through the opening credits. I think of movies as 
an escape from everyday life, and, if you can't handle 
being out of touch for two hours, don't go to the movies. 
Throughout the movie I thought I was hearing eerie 
background noise; being a "horror" movie, this seemed 
normal, but then 1 realized it was just the stupid kids 
in front of me whispering. I also heard several cell 
phones ring, including the woman beside me. 1 looked 
at her with the most evil glare I could and said a few 
choice words under my breath but loud enough for her 
to hear. Watching that movie was probably the worst 
theater experience I've ever had. 

What I'm trying to get across here is that if you're 
going to the movies, then go to watch the movie. Don't 
go so you can get away from your parents, even though 
they're sitting a few rows back. Don't go to keep an eye 
on your kids. Don't go to talk and giggle with your 
friends. Movie theaters are not social centers. That's 
why we have bars or, if you're not old enough, parties. 
Now. look at my picture. If you walk into a movie the- 
ater and see me: turn off your cell phone; shut your 
mouth, and do not ask me to move. 



Page 10 



TOS CLAMOJT CALL 



September 29. 2005 



tlissilieis 



Greek \k Travel. Kmplepenl. Fur KenI, kmuk and lieneml ids 



■ 6RE£KS 

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmtmmmtm 

Congratulations to our 
Sister of the Week, Kerry 
Ballina! 
Love, A<1>E 

Congratulations Karleen for 
making Homecoming Court! 
-AIT V Your Sisters 

Congratulations Caitlin on 
being Sister of the Week! 
■AIT 

Congrats to the Shlubby of 
the Week, Ryan Licht! 
■KAP 

Congrats to the Brother of 
the Week, Curtis Sneil 
■KAP 

Thank to the ZTA for letting 

us use their grill! 

■KAP 

Congrats Sister of the Week 
Marcle Schmidt and Chair 
of the Week Annie Bria! 
•Love. Your AZ Sisters 

All eyes are on you Tara!! 
•Love. Your AZ Sisters 

Congrats Fall 2005!! 
•Love, AZ Sisters 



next year! Call Barb at 814- 
226 0767 or 814-379-9721 
for more info. 

ROLL OUT OF BED AND 

GO TO CLASS! Houses and 
apartments next to campus. 
See them at www.grayand- 
company.net or call FREE 
Gray and Co. 877-562- 1020. 



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-IT Ash 



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PERSONALS 



Mr. Bice, 

Do not talk about what you 

do not know. By the way 

your column sucks. 

■KAP 



Join Bazaar! Clarion's new 
campus magazine! Come to 
the meeting next 

Wednesday the 5th at 5:00 
p.m. in 208 Davi.s Hall! 



Meghan, 






Can I go out on 


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-Love, Dusty 






Mindy, 






Are you going 


to pay 


my 


bill? 






■Love, Dusty 






P.S. It's $12.00 


now! 





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ple and HOUSES for 47 
people available for the Fall 
2006/Spring 2007 semes- 
ters. Get a great place for Happy 18th B-day bro! Love 



J-Money, 

I sure did have a Happy 
Hoss's Birthday with you. 
Thank you so much for tak- 
ing care of me. 
• Love Christina 

Pfiel, 

Stop eating all of the food. 
Save room for the others. 
- Love Money's Girlfriend 

Ashley, 

Happy 22nd Birthday! 

■ Love The Call Staff 

Ryan, 



Dan, 

I'm sorry I cut your eye with 

paper. I hope you still love 

me. 

■Ash 

Ash, 

It is ok, I still love you. 
Thank you for getting me 
the eye drops to make me 
feel better! 
Dan 

Em, 

Happy 2l8t Birthday early! 

Just remember, you do have 

class the next day, and you 

do need to function. Enjoy, 

but don't over do it! 

-Dan 

Jeter, 

Welcome to the Family! 

•Hugs and Kisses, John and 

Jill 

Jolly, 

Only 8 more days! 

-Mel 

Dan, 

When are we going to the 

movies? 

■Tina 

Tina, 

Whenever you're going to 

take me on our date. Psh. 

-Dan 

Beth, 

Happy 21st Birthday!!! 

-The Caii Staff 

Miss Sickler, 

To err is human. To forgive 
is divine. Maybe someday I 
won't crumble under the 
glare of your intense expec- 
tations. 
-Merry Christmas 

Mr. Wonderful, 
I can't wait until our elec- 
trons pair up and we form a 
bond. 
-Mrs. Wonderful 

Chris, 

Are you done with the mar- 
riage contract yet? 
■Love, Meghan ; 




Melissa Holller/rh« Clarion Call 
GREEKS PROMOTE ANTI-HAZING WEEK - The Greek community passed out Anti-Hazing Week 
fliers. 








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THE CLARION CAU. 



Page 11 



Scores 



Events 



Intramurals 




larion 
coreboard 




Cross Country 

Sept. 10 

@ Thiel 

W: 1 of 12; M: 1 of 9 

Sept. 16 
@ Slippery Rock 
W: 19-39, W; 
M: 42-19, L 

Sept. 24 

@ St. Vincent 

W: 1 of li; M: 1 of 11 

Football 

Aug. 26 

@ West Chester 

14-43 L 

Sept. 3 
Kutztown 
29-23, W (40T) 

Sept. 17 
Mansfield 
15-12, W 

Sept. 24 
California 
7-43, L 

Golf 

Sept 9-10 

@ Ohio Valley Invite 

4th of 16 



Sept 18-19 
Hal Hansen Invite 
( @ Clarion Oaks) 
3rd of 18 

Soccer 

Sept. 13 

@ Lock Haven 

0-1, L 

Sept. 16 
California 
2-3, L (2 OT) 



Sept. 19 
Indiana 
0-4, L 

Sept. 23 
Gannon 
2-1, W 

Sept. 27 
Slippey Rock 
1-4, L 

Tennis 

Sept 2 
@NJIT 
6-1, W 

Sept. 3 

@ Georgian Court 

6-3, W 



Sept. 10 
St. Vincent 
7-2, W 

Sept. 15 

@ West Liberty 

4-5, L 

Sept. 17 
Bloomsburg 
1-8, L 

VoUeybaU 

Sept. 17 
@ California 
0-3, L 

Sept. 20 
@ Indiana 
1-3, L 

Sept. 23-24 
PSAC Crossover 
@ East Stroudsburj 
3-1, W 

Shippensburg 
3-0, W 

West Chester 
3-0, W 

Sept. 27 
Edinboro 
3-0, W 



CU at Athletic Events 



Cross Country 

Oct.l 

Clarion United Way Invite 

Oct. 8 

@ Carnegie Mellon 

Football 

Oct. 1 

@ Edinboro 

Oct. 8 

East Stroudsburg 

Golf 

Oct. 2 

@ W & J Invite 



Oct. 3-4 

@ Wheeling Jesuit Invite 

Soccer 
Oct. 1 
@ Indiana 

Oct. 5 

@Edinboro 

Oct. 7 
Pitt-Johnstown 

Tennis 

Sept. 29 



Sept. 30 

@ East Stroudsburg 

Oct. 1 
@ Niagra 

VolleybaD 

Sept. 30- Oct. 1 
Holiday Inn Classic 

Oct. 4 

@ Lock Haven 

Oct. 7-8 

PSAC Crossover 



Do you need some help using the library? 



Carlson Library Open Sessions 



Open to all students and are offered on a first-come first-served basis. Reservations 
will not be accepted. 

Level 2 Instruction Lab in Carlson Library (Room # 201) 

Friday, Sept 30 

10:00-10:50 - Introduction to PILOT and General Periodical Databases 

1:00-1:50 - Introduction to Resources in Women's Studies 

Monday, Oct. 3 

10:00-10:50 - Introduction to Research Resources in Literature and Literary Criticism 

5:00-5:50 - Introduction to PILOT and General Periodical Databases 

Tuesday, Oct. 4 

10:00-11:00 - Introduction to Research Resources in Literature and Literary Criticism 

3:00-4:00 - Introduction to PILOT and General Periodical Databases 

Wednesday, Oct. 5 

10:00-10:50 - Introduction to Research Resources in Chemistry 

2:00-2:50 - Introduction to PILOT and General Periodical Databases 

Thursday, Oct. 6 

9:00-10:00 - Introduction to Research Resources in the Sciences 

3:00-4:00 - Introduction to PILOT and General Periodical Databases 

For more information, visit: 
www.ciarion.edu/library/teacliinqschedule.shtml 



-A 



Doug Knepp - Intramural, Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393-1667 



SKRun 

Saturday, 10/1 9:00 am. 

"Sponsored by the United Way". 

Part of the Autumn Leaf festivities include a 5K 
road race to benefit the United Way. For more 
info - stop by the Rec Center, Tippin Gym or call 
226-8760. First 200 registrants will receive a T- 
shirl and free lunch. Special cost is $12 for all 
CUP students. In addition, Intramurals will 
reimburse half the cost for CUP students that turn 
in a receipt after the race. Race day registration 
starts at 7:45 am. Stait ALF out right by 
supporting the United Way and having some Fun! 

Dodgeball Results 

Wednesday, 9/21 



Stop Woman Suffrage 

NADS 

KDR 

Team Beat It 



F 

2-0 
M 
2-0 

KDR 2-0 

Stop Woman Suffrage 2-0 

NADS 2-0 

Hx Baliaz 2-0 



Second to None 
S. H. Waffle Irons 
Ex Baliaz 
Trash Monkeys 

Monday, 9/26 

Second to None 
Trash Monkeys 
Team Beat It 
S.H. Waffle Irons 

'Tall into Fitness'' program 

Every Thursday at 4pm. Check the IM web-site for 
links to infonnation, including all BATTLE PLANS!! 



4 person GOLF SCRAMBLE 

RESCHEDULED due to rain - Tuesday, 10/4 
Clarion Oaks Coiintrv Club 

Register your team at the Rec center, ihcii call the 
coiu'sc at 226-8888 lo resent a tee time. This is an IS 
hole best ball scramble. Students golf lor '^2 price- $8,50 
- walk or $10 - ride. (You tiiust follow course policies.) 
To quality for the prize you must turn your conipleled 
scorccard into the Intramural oflkc by Wednesday, 
10/5. In case of a lie, a scorccard playoff will be used. 

Volleyball Results 



DPhiH 

BcihMudrev 
Sexy Women 
Delta Zcta 
('heerCU 



To Be Announced 21-12.21-19 
Girls 12-2K2I-17,21-18 

Delta Zeia 15-12,15-10 

W' e Suck 
Incredibles 



Ihe Tuna Tacos Athlct. Challenged 

Thursday, 9/22 

Don't Cha's Delta Zeia 

Beth Mudrey D Phi E 

Team R'F Se.xy Woman 

[n4Jne Hockey 



score n/a 
score 11/a 
score n/a 



F 
F 



score n/a 



(James begin Thursday, 9/29 
It's not too late to rcgisier your team!! 

*AII players must wear approved helmets 
with face shields!! (If you donT have a helnun, 
boiTow one from the Recreation Center.) 




WHITE WATER RAFTING 

AND CAMPING 

Thursday & Friday, Oct 7 - 8 

'Tipper' Gauley River (The Beast of (he East) 

Cost is only $25 for students, 

Trip will be leaving Clarion around 4:00 pni on 
Thursday and returning approximately 9:00 pm on 
Friday. Transportation, tents, and several meals 
will be provided. You need a sleeping bag. fhis 
is Class 1V+ Whitewater action and prior railing 
experience is reconuncnded! Sign up at the 
Recreation Center front desk. Space is limited to 
the first 21 people who register. 



Flag Football Results 

Tuesday, 9/27 



Just Ball 
Prime Time 
Free Bailers 
llardMuffmsS 
Beers 
Schlitz's 
Ballz Deep 
KDR 



Steelers 
StMU 

Bench Press This 
No Ma'am 
Quick 6 
The Heat 
Lady Canes 
Nuphies 



28-15 

56-0 

36-12 

56-26 

32-26 

41-18 

40-20 

3.5-24 



Outdoor Soccer Results 

Tuesday. 9/2/ 

Team No. 2 Team No. 1 

The Internationals The Brew Crew 



2-1 

2-1 



Page 12 



Tm CLARION CikLL 



September 29. 2005 



> 



Sf$rts 

Clarion soccer snaps losing skid; 
defeats Gannon in 2-1 victory 



Today: Soccer Earns Split Volleyball Takes First 

X-C teams 
finish first 
at St. VIn's 




Clarion Call File Photo 
GOLDEN EAGLE SOCCER EARNS SECOND WIN - The Clarion soccer team attempts a pass in last 
year's game against Gannon. The Golden Eagles defeated the Knights on Friday at home to snap 
a seven game losing streak. 



Chris McCissick 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_cjmcckissick@clarion,eclu 

The Clarion University 
Women's soccer team won at 
home on Friday against 
Gannon 2-1 to snap a seven 
game losing streak. 
In the win over Gannon, 



freshman Rachel Schmitz, 
with an assist from Maegan 
Connelly, started off the 
scoring by nailing in a goal 
at the 34:38 mark in the 
first half. 

Senior Jessie Zahner 
added a goal making it 2-0 
Clarion at the half Coach 



Nina Alonzo said, "They 
came out of the locker room 
knowing not to have a let 
down." 

This was put to the test 
pretty quickly with Gannon 
scoring a goal early in the 
second half. 

"I was sort of glad it hap- 
pened and it put us in panic 



mode," said Alonzo. "This 
taught us how to play with 
the lead and how to hold on 
to it." 

Clarion did hold on long 
enough for the 2-1 victory. 
Clarion out shot Gannon 9-7 
and goaltender Caitlin Dilal 
had four saves. 

"The girls deserved this 
win and they played well," 
said Alonzo. "Going into this 
game the team felt it was 
time to turn things around. 
The two practices we had 
this week went back to our 
roots. Why we play, to have 
fun, and to work to get out of 
losing." 

In addition, fan represnta- 
tion also played an impor- 
tant role in the Golden 
Eagles intensity. 

"The energy and support 
we've received from the fans 
is very much appreciated 
and I hope it continues," 
Coach Alonzo added. 

Things weren't quite as 
joyful on Monday, however; 
as the Lady Eagles lost to 
Slippery Rock 4-1. 

With the loss Clarion fell 
to 2-9 and 0-5 in the PSAC. 
Shppery Rock improved to 
5-2-2 and 3-0-1 in the PSAC. 
However, the final score 
doesn't indicate how well 
the Eagles played. 

Clarion out shot Slippery 
Rock 11-10 and it was the 
first time in four years that 
they have out shot Slippery 
Rock. "They took advantage 
of their chances and we 



didn't," said Coach Alonzo. 

Nikki Scott scored the 
lone Clarion goal just before 
the half to make it 2-1 
Slippery Rock. 

"We sveren't ready and we 
came out flat in the second 
half," said Coach Alonzo, 

"It's frustrating for the 
team and we are competing 
with teams that we didn't 
before. We have to go back 
and fix the little mistakes 
on defense and capitalize on 
our chances. We need some- 
one to step up and put the 
ball in the net." 

Next up for the Golden 
Eagles is a tough roadtrip to 
Indiana on Saturday. lUP 
leads the PSAC with an 8- 
1-1 record and they are 
undefeated in PSAC play 
with a 4-0-1 mark. 



Game Notes 

Clarion's win over 
Gannon snapped a 
seven game losing 
streak. 



I Clarion won despite 
having no corner kicks. 
Gannon had nine. 



I Nicole Scott's goal in 
the Slippery Rock 
game was her first of 



Sports feature: 

Student learns key to 
CU's athletic training 



Josh Woods 
Sports Editor 

sjlwoods@clarion.edu 



Clarion University sopho- 
more and Curwensville 
native Derek Bracken is 
learning the importance of 
athletic training in Golden 
Eagle sports. 

"Most people have this 
misconception that athletic 
training is just taping 
ankles and wrists, but it's 
more than that," said 
Bracken. "The number one 
goal of athletic training is to 
prevent injuries before they 
happen." 

Bracken chose athletic 
training as a major after 
careful consideration of 
what would be a potentially 
enjoyable career upon the 
encouragement of his high 
school athletic trainer 
Jessica Roberts. 

"I came to Clarion because 
of its location, but I chose 
the athletic training field 
because I've been involved 
with sports my entire life 
and I knew I'd be happy in 
that field for the rest of my 
life," said Bracken. 

Because of the nature of 
sports and how injuries are 
affected by them, prevent- 
ing injuries is essential to 
success. It could mean pro- 
tecting a star player from 
getting hurt before a big 
game or* preventing a minor 
injury from hampering an 
athlete from performing to 
the best of their ability. 



Each factor is equally 
important and both are 
issues that are taken seri- 
ously in the Clarion 
University athletic training 
program. 

Bracken, who is currently 
assisting the Golden Eagle 
soccer team, finds him self 
in the second year of that 
program and to this point 
has learned several valuable 
lessons. 

"As a freshman I was 
required to have hours and 
hours of observation and 
now as a sophomore I'm get- 
ting hands-on experience in 
dealing with injury preven- 
tion and treatment of 
injuries," said Bracken. 

Part of that hands-on 
experience is being at each 
of the university's team 
sports practices for a mini- 
mum of two to three hours a 
day for the duration of the 
students' four year college 
career. 

Currently the students 
are in rotation between 
teams. Bracken's schedule 
for example, began with 
football for the first three 
weeks of the semester, is 
now continuing with soccer 
for the next few weeks, and 
transferring to something 
else in the weeks to come. 

In addition, the students 
also participate in "mod- 
ules" or real-life simulations 
in which they learn how to 
deal with a variety of situa- 
tions that they are likely to 
experience in the field. 

"The certified athletic 



trainers and seniors here at 
Clarion have been extreme- 
ly helpful in the learning 
process," said Bracken as he 
took part in his daily rou- 
tine of practicing taping 
ankles on one of his neigh- 
bors. 

"If we can diagnose some- 
thing and get it taken care 
of before it becomes a more 
serious issue or do a good 
job in a rehabilitative situa- 
tion we can help our teams 
be that much more success- 
ful." 

For Bracken practice is 
the key "I've learned to tape 
ankles, wrists, and thumbs, 
as well as the evaluation 
process and how to make 
proper assessments of 
injuries," said Bracken of 
his commitment. 

Clearly, he is on the right 
track. Thanks to Bracken 
and all of the other students 
in the program, as well as 
the universities own certi- 
fied trainers the future of 
Clarion athletics looks to be 
in good hands. 

As for Bracken's future- 
well it looks to be in good 
hands as well. 

"I've already worked with 
my high school's football 
team during summer prac- 
tice and have gotten a taste 
of what that is Uke," said 
Bracken. 

"Right now though I'm 
considering going to grad 
school when I graduate and 
working here at the univer- 
sity, because I've really 
enjoyed helping out here." 



Josh Woods 
Sports Editor 

sJjlwoods®clarion.edu 

Both of Clarion's cross 
country teams finished first- 
place over the weekend in 
an invitational at St. 
Vincent College. 

With the win the women's 
team remained undefeated. 
Erin Richard, who has won 
all of Clarion's races, lead 
the way to victory over a St. 
Vincent squad that had 
been ranked in the top 25 in 
the NAIA. 

Katie Jarzab and Tasha 
Wheatley also contributed, 
with second and third place 
finishes, giving the Golden 
Eagles the top three spots. 

With the win the women 
have moved up the rankings 
from being unranked in the 
Region to 9th. 

On the men's side, despite 
missing two of their top five 
runners, the Golden Eagles 
annihilated the competition 
by a 30 point margin in an 
8K race. 

Sean Williams (26:56) 
won his first collegiate cross 
country race in the win, fin- 
ishing just ahead of team- 
mate Bill Herrmann (27:16). 

Next up for the Golden 
Eagle harriers is their only 
home contest of the season, 
the annual Clarion United 
Way Invitational that will 
kick off the Autumn Leaf 
Festival activities on 
Saturday. 



Volleyball takes first In 
weekend tournament 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ekbowser@clarion.edu 

EAST STROUDSBURG- 
This past weekend the vol- 
leyball team traveled to 
East Stroudsburg for a six- 
team PSAC Crossover tour- 
nament where they finished 
first place. 

The Golden Eagles faced 
host East Stroudsburg in 
their first round match up, 
prevailing 3-1, defeating 
Shippensburg in round two 
by a 3-0 count. 

The team then moved on 
to the finals where they 
impressively disposed of 
West Chester to become 
tournament champions. 
With the wins, Clarion 
improved to 13-5 on the sea- 
son. 

Coach Tracy Fluharty was 
very pleased with the per- 
formance of her team. "They 
played with much more con- 
sistency, the middles did a 
really good job of closing a 
block and the defense 
played very smart," she 
said. 

Overall the team lived up 
to Coach Fluharty's expecta- 
tions for the tournament: 
"Going in the focus was to be 
more consistent and we 



also met our goal of getting 
three regional wins." When 
all was said and done sever- 
al Golden Eagles stepped up 
each of their individual 
games in the consistency 
department and stood out 
with outstanding individual 
performances. 

"Sarah Fries has been 
doing a great job of hitting 
on the right side and overall 
has just done a great job 
making plays. 



« 



Going in the focus 
was to be more con- 
sistent and we were 
this weekend. 

- Coach Fluharty 

Also, Karen Stoklosa and 
Lindsay Banner have both 
done a great job blocking in 
the middle," said Coach 
Fluharty. 

After three straight losses to 
Slippery Rock, California 
and lUP respectively that 
had the Golden Eagles reel- 
ing, the tournament win 
was a huge confidence boost. 
With regionals approxi- 
mately a month away, mid- 
season success in a tourna- 



ment situation should be a 
big step in the right direc- 
tion for a Golden Eagle 
squad that is continually 
improving. 

"Our goal for the rest of 
the year is to continue to get 
stronger match by match to 
turn around the wins in our 
conference and to earn more 
regional wins," said Coach 
Fluharty. 

Next up for the Golden 
Eagles is their annual 
Holiday Inn Classic to be 
held this weekend in Tippin 
Gym as well as the Clarion 
University Recreational 
Center. 

Participating in the ten- 
team meet will be Anderson, 
East Stroudsburg, Edinboro 
Geneva, Lees-Mcrae, Lock 
Haven, Shippensburg, 
Slippery Rock and Virginia 
Union. 

Clarion will open play 
with their first of four tour- 
nament matches versus 
Geneva at 2 p.m. and follow 
up with a 6 p.m. match with 
Shippensburg, both on 
Friday. 

They will finish up tourna- 
ment play on Saturday 
afternoon at 12 and 2 ver- 
sus Anderson and East 
Stroudsburg. 



Attention sports fans! 

Want to write for The Clarion Cain 

Contact: 

Josh Woods, Sports Editor 

393-2380 



/ 






One copy free 

THE 



<«Ritual to reality'' 

See ''Features" page 6 



Phi Delta Tlieta's f asltion fundraiser 

See ''Features*' page 7 




Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 




I CALL 



Volunne 91 Issue 5 



October 6, 2005 




lots, Angates Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

Nine Charged With Wire 
Fraud in Katrina Fundi 

BAKERSFIELD,Calif. - 
Nine people have been 
charged with wire fraud 
in a icheme that siphoned 
off Red Cross funds 
intended for victims of 
Hurricane Katrina, the 
FBI said Tuesday. 

Four of those arrested 
were contract workers at 
a Red Cross national call 
center in Bakersfield, said 
Lawrence Brown, first 
assistant U.S. attorney in 
Sacramento, Calif. The 
other five were friends 
and relatives who picked 
up relief checks they 
weren't entitled to, he 
ijEtid. 

Storms Show a System 
Out of Balance 

WASHINTON - Four 
hurricanes had hit 
Florida in 2004, and the 
evidence was overwhelm- 
ing that the Federal 
Emergency Management 
Agency had botched its 
response. Some of the 
hardest - hit counties, 
coiriplained Florida law- 
makers, were overlooked, 
while other counties out of 
harm's way had received 
lavish relief - to the tune 
of tens of millions of dol- 
lars, much of it for dam- 
age that could not be doc- 
umented. 

Much (rf U.S. Armament 
Stored in S. Korea in 
Disrepair 

WASHINTON-Critical 
U.S. miUtary war stocks 
in South Korea fell into 
such significant disrepair 
in the past year that it 
could have slowed a U.S. 
ground response to North 
Korean hostilities or 
another Pacific conflict, 
unreleased classified and 
unclassified U.S. govern- 
ment reports show. 

Problems ranged from 
faulty engines to cracked 
gun tubes, with some 
tanks requiring more 
than 1,000 hours of main- 
tenance to fix fully - a 
condition that would have 
delayed for days their use 
in a conflict, reports by 
the Government 

AccountabiUty Office and 
Army officials say. 

Bush Concedes Social 
Security Restructuring Is 
Dead fbr Now 

WASHINTON- President 
Bush on Tuesday 
acknowledged for the first 
time that his plan to 
restructure Social 

Security, once his top sec- 
ond-term domestic priori- 
ty, is moribund because he 
has been unable to build 
public support for it. 
Citing the expensive and 

tore urgent task of 
(building New Orleans 
Mid other hurricane dam- 
aged regions of the Gulf 
states, Bush asserted that 
he retained "plenty, plen- 
ty^ of political capital to 
push his agenda through 
Congress. 



Roberts is confirmed 
as 17tli cliief Justice 



Maura Reynolds 

Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

WASHINGTON, Sept. 30 - 
Hours after the Senate con- 
firmed him overwhelmingly, 
John G. Roberts Jr. took the 
oath Thursday as the 17th 
chief justice of the United 
States. 

Now, President Bush must 
nominate another Supreme 
Court member, to replace 
retiring Justice Sandra Day 
O'Connor, and that selection 
will likely determine the 
direction of the Roberts-led 
court. On Monday, the 
Supreme Court begins a 
new term. 

The 78-22 confirmation 



(( 



...judging is different 
from politics. And I 
appreciate that vote 
very much. 



- John Roberts 



vote for Roberts, 50, was a 
triumph for Bush. Although 
Roberts is unlikely to dra- 
matically alter the court's 
political balance, he could 
serve for decades. 
Bush's choice of Roberts 
who combined stellar legal 
credentials with a modest 
manner - divided and dis- 
armed Democrats. Roberts' 
conservative legal record 
pleased Republicans, but his 
pledge during his confirma- 
tion hearing to respect legal 
precedent over ideology 
helped him win significant 
Democratic support. 

Roberts replaces the judge 
for whom he once clerked. 
Chief Justice William H. 
Rehnquist, who died Sept. 3. 
He is the youngest chief jus- 
tice since 45-year-old John 
Marshall was confirmed for 
the post in 1801. Roberts 
has lifetime tenure and 
could influence decisions not 
only about pressing social 
issues such as abortion 
rights and gay rights, but 
matters sure to grow in 



importance in the future, 
such as the reach of technol- 
ogy into the private lives of 
Americans. 

In Thursday's vote, 22 of 
the Senate's 44 Democrats 
joined all 55 Republicans 
and the chamber's lone 
independent, Jim Jeffords of 
Vermont, to confirm 
Roberts. 

The swearing-in ceremony 
at the White House also was 
a high point for Bush after 
weeks of criticism of his 
administration's initial 
response to the damages 
wrought by Hurricane 
Katrina. Bush praised 
Roberts, who two years ago 
was appointed a federal 
appellate court ji dge, as "a 
man with an astute mind 
and a kind heart." 

Surrounded by other 
Supreme Court justices, 
congressional leaders and 
his family, Roberts offered 
the simple promise "to do 
the best job I possibly can 
do. And I will try to do that 
every day." 

He also took note of the 
bipartisan backing he 
received, saying, "I view the 
vote this morning as confir- 
mation of what is, for me, a 
bedrock principle that judg- 
ing is different from politics. 
And I appreciate the vote 
very much." 

Even as Roberts was con- 
firmed and sworn-in, much 
of Washington's attention 
had shifted to who Bush will 
choose to replace O'Connor, 
who in July announced 
plans to retire. 
Roberts was initially tapped 
by Bush to replace 
O'Connor. But the president 
then picked Roberts to be 
chief justice after the death 
of Rehnquist, a staunch con- 
servative who had served on 
the court since 1972 and led 
it since 1986. 

One reason Roberts' con- 
firmation went smoothly for 
the White House was 
because his choice is not 
expected to cause a shift in 
the court. But O'Connor - 
poised between the court's 

See "ROBERTS" pag9 2 




Photo courtesy of University Relations 
HOMECOMING 2005 - Presenting 17 of the 18 nominatees for the Homecoming Court. 



Car accident In Alaska hits home 



Beth Kibler 
Assistant News Editor 

s_eakibler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 5 - The Clarion 
University community was 
affected when Mr. Lawrence 
Kosko and Mrs. Sue Kosko, the 
parents of two Clarion students, 
were involved in a fatal car acci- 
dent in Anchorage, Ak., early 
Sunday, Sept. 25. Mr. and Mrs. 
Kosko who were pronounced 
dead on the scene leave behind 
three children. 

Jarrett and Trevor Kosko, of 
Monroeville, Pa., and their 13- 
year-old brother, Gavin, learned 



about their parents' accident 
from their grandparents on 
Sunday Sept. 25. 

Earlier that Sunday, around 
9:30a.m., Lawrence and Sue 
Kosko were sightseeing along 
the Seward Highway about 40 
miles south of Anchorage, Ak., 
when a 1996 GMC pickup tmck 
crossed the center line and hit 
the Kosko 's rented 2005 Ford 
Focus head-on. The couple, both 
48, died before paramedics 
arrived on scene. 

The driver of the pickup truck, 
Nick L. Thurmond, 20, of 
Homer, Ak., was treated for 
minor injuries. A toxicology test 



was given to Thurmond, but the 
results are not yet available. 

A 1991 Dodge van, driven by 
Peter Taylor. 62, of Anchorage, 
was also involved in crash. 
Taylor was following the Focus 
and could not stop fast enough. 
Taylor was taken to a local hos- 
pital and treated for minor 
injuries. 

Lawrence was in Alaska on 
business for ABARTA Inc., a 
company based in Pittsburgh. 
His wife joined him and the two 
were taking advantage of some 
free time by sightseeing in the 
country. 



Business dept receives CFPB registration 



Katie Fischer 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kcfisclier@clarion.eciu 

CLARION, Oct. 4 - The 
business department 

received their registration 
with the Certified Financial 
Planning Board this 
September, for their 
Personal Financial 

Planning program. The 
business department had 
put in its application to the 
CFPB in June before receiv- 
ing it last month. 

The registration to the 
CFPB now makes Clarion 
University's program 

nationally recognized, 

meaning that the curricu- 
lum holds all the require- 
ments for taking the CFPB 
exam. Passing the CFPB 
exam will give the taker a 
certificate that is crucial to 
finding a job in the financial 
planning field. 



Clarion University's cur- 
rent PFP program has exist- 
ed in the business depart- 
ment for two years, with 30 
current students. The stu- 
dents take financial plan- 
ning classes such as 
Financial Institutions, Tax 
Planning, Retirement & 
Estate Planning, and of 
course Personal Financial 
Planning. While the 4 year 
B.S. in Business with a con- 
centration in Finance 
degree includes all of the 
CFPB approved curriculum, 
the actual CFPB certifica- 
tion comes from the exam 
taken after graduation. 

"This should help the pro- 
gram, and Clarion 
University, to attract stu- 
dents who are interested in 
careers in the financial serv- 
ices industry," said Dr. Jeff 
Eicher, a professor in the 
Financial Department, 
"Additionally, it should be a 



valuable addition for any 
student who has interest in 
personal financial planning 
for their personal situation." 
To become registered with 
the CFPB, the university 
first had to have all of the 
PFP courses reviewed by the 
CFPB, making sure all 101 
topics of financial planning 
was covered by the courses 
in satisfactory detail. After 
the courses were approved, 
the university completed its 
application to the CFBP, 
which included faculty biog- 
raphies, a class syllabus, 
and features of the program. 
The CFPB Board was 
founded in 1985 and holds 
today's standards for finan- 
cial planners all over the 
country. It exists to make 
sure that people can get the 
financial planning they 
need in an ethical and com- 
petent approach. 



Public safety releases annual "safety report" 



Brittnee Koebler 
Assistant Editor 

s_bekoebler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 4 - The 
Public Safety Department of 
Clarion University has 
recently gathered crime sta- 
tistics to produce the annual 
security report, which 
includes statistics for 2002 
through 2004. 

This report provides infor- 
mation for residence hall 
crimes, which is a sub-set of 
on campus crimes. Also, it 
presents the data for non 
campus crimes, which 
includes any off campus 
housing that provides hous- 
ing through a contract with 
the university, off-campus 
fraternity and sorority hous- 
es and the Reinhard 
Villages housing complex. 
In addition, crimes commit- 
ted on roads and sidewalks 
adjacent to the university 



are considered Public 
Property in the report. 

While some of the crime 
statistics show a decrease 
over the past three years, it 
is hard to use that as an 
indicator that crime is ulti- 
mately decreasing. 
However, since Campbell 
Hall closed last December, 
there have been fewer stu- 
dents on campus, as well as 
fewer crimes. 

"The fewer students living 
on campus, the lower the 
crime rates," said Director 
of Public Safety at Clarion 
University, David G. 
Tedjeske. "Although, even if 
we did have the same num- 
ber of students, I think we'd 
see a decrease. It's hard to 
pinpoint a reason." 

The report shows that 
there were 21 cases of non- 
forcible burglary which 
decreased to 16 cases in 
2004 and four cases of 



forcible burglary in 2003, 
which ceased to zero in 
2004. 

Some may accredit this to 
residence hall security 
aides. "I think their [resi- 
dence hall security aides] 
presence around campus 
makes people more aware of 
their actions," said sopho- 
more Bryan Coffey. 

In agreement, freshman 
Mark Winkler said, "Having 
security aides is a great 
idea, because that's another 
person you can go to for 
help, and having them walk- 
ing around at night will help 
the campus police prevent 
crime." 

"Residence Hall Security 
Aides have been an extra set 
of eyes in the halls." said 
Tedjeske. According to 
Tedjeske, closed circuit cam- 
eras were also installed with 
money that was raised from 
Violence Against Women, 



which have also helped to 
make arrests for theft in the 
library and dorms. 

"The library has been a 
great place to study, but do 
not leave your things go 
unattended for long," said 
Tedjeske. He also advises 



students to be cautious dur- 
ing the end of the semesters, 
due to a noticeable increase 
in criminal activity during 
this time, and also recom- 
mend keeping dorm doors 

See "PUBUC SAFETY" pagfi 2 




SAFETY REPORT 

crime statistics 



Melissa Holller/TTie Clarion Call 

Public Safety released its annual set of 



Page 2 



TOE CLARION CALL 



October 6. 2005 



lews 



"ROBERTS" cofltfniMd from 
frontpage 

liberal and conservative 
wings has been a swing vote 
in recent years on several 
close decisions on controver- 
sial issues. As a result, the 
approval process for her suc- 
cessor is expected to be more 
contentious. 

White House aides have 
acknowledged it will not be 
easy for the n "xt nominee to 
obtain the sup^jort Roberts 
received. 

Democrats increasingly 
have reminded Republicans 



that their party's threat 
stands to filibuster a nomi- 
nee who they believe is an 
ideological conservative. 
"If it's an ideologue ... there 
would be a good chance we 
would move to block the 
vote on the floor," Sen. 
Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., 
said Thursday, referring to 
the filibuster tactic the 
minority party can use to 
prevent a Senate vote. "The 
message to the president is 
we would eagerly embrace a 
consensus nominee, a nomi- 
nee who would be main- 
stream, who would not turn 



the clock back on basic 
rights." 

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D- 
Calif., said, "In the last 10 
years, the court has moved 
dramatically to the right, ... 
"I think the president is well 
advised to take heed of this. 
The nation is extraordinari- 
ly divided and polarized." 
Feinstein voted against 
Roberts' confirmation. 

Republicans also braced 
for a harsher fight over the 
next nominee, making a 
point of praising the "civili- 
ty" shown by Democrats 
during Roberts' confirma- 



tion process. 

"As we move forward to fill 
the second vacancy on the 
high court, I urge my col- 
leagues to be mindful of the 
lessons that we've learned 
from Chief Justice Roberts' 
nomination," Senate 

Majority Leader Bill Frist, 
RTenn., said after 
Thursday's vote. "By focus- 
ing on qualifications and 
judicial philosophy rather 
than political ideology, we 
can continue to preserve the 
integrity of the judicial nom- 
inations process." 



Act 72 attempts to lower property taxes 



Lindsay Grystar 
Assistant News Editor 

s_llgrystar@clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Oct. 4 - 
Governor Rendell will soon 
mandate Act 72, a home- 
owner tax relief act, to allow 
school districts to help lower 
property taxes to those 
schools that approve the act. 
Act 72 was introduced to 
move some of the school tax 
burden in Pennsylvania 
from property taxes to an 
income tax. Taxpayers with- 
out earned income, such as 
retirees, will pay no income 
tax. The Act vows to bring 
property tax relief to home- 



owners by lowering property 
taxes and makes up with 
funds from legalized slot 
machine gambUng. 

Because of the require- 
ment to raise income taxes 
and the impact on each 
school district is different, 
participation in the act is 
varied. 

Clarion Country school 
districts had to decide to 
either accept or deny the 
legislation by May 30. Ill 
out of 501 school districts 
opted in on the administra- 
tion decision, while 390 
opted out. All of the Clarion 
County schools did not 
accept the proposal. Schools 



that opt in will require the 
school district to impose an 
additional one tenth of one 
percent earned income tax 
to those living in that school 




Governor Edward Rendell 



district. 



Pennsylvania Department 
of Education Web site, the 
Clarion Area would receive 
a 26.54 percent reduction in 
residential real estate taxes 
if $1 Bilhon were available, 
which would result in a 
$219 reduction per house- 
hold. 

Fourteen new slot 
machine locations that were 
authorized by Act 71 will be 
built during the next few 
years. Depending on the 
revenue received, the esti- 
mates are between $500 
million and $1 billion, which 
could be generated for tax 
relief. 



According to the 



Flame To Fire holds fifth annual vigil 



Karen NIcodemus 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Oct. 4 - Flame 
to Fire is holding its fifth 
annual domestic violence 
vigil on Oct. 11 at 6 p.m. at 
the University Free Speech 
Zone outside of the Gemmell 
Student Center. 

The vigil is sponsored by 
Women United, Students 
Together Against Rape 
(STAR), Feminist Majority 
Leadership Alliance 

(FMLA), Women's Studies 
Center and Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 

The vigil is in remem- 
brance of the victims of 
domestic violence and in cel- 
ebration of the survivors. It 
is also intended to educate 
anyone who may not know 
the enormity of the problem 
of domestic violence. The 
goal of Flame to Fire is to 
try and change the now, so 
future generations do not 
live with domestic violence. 

Another goal of Flame to 
Fire is also to help SAFE 
(Stop Abuse for Everyone), a 
local safe house for anyone 
experiencing domestic vio- 
lence and PASSAGES 
(Prevention And Service for 
Sexual Assault through 
Guidance, Empowerment 



and Support), the local rape 
crisis center, raise money 
and supplies. All of the 
organizations are collecting 
supplies in the Women's 
Studies Center such as 
umbreiias, toiletries, sweat- 
pants, sweatshirts, canned 
goods, coffee and tea to 
donate to SAFE and PAS- 
SAGES. 

National activists and 
authors, Jennifer 

Baumgardner and Amy 
Richards of the Web site 
www.soapbox.com will be 
speaking alongside student 
survivors showing that 
domestic violence is a prob- 
lem in Clarion. 

"I want to help others who 
have experienced this 
(domestic violence) to know 
they aren't the only one by 
sharing my story," said sen- 
ior Missy Meyer who will be 
speaking at Flame to Fire. 
"It needs to be clear that it 
really happens closer than 
most people think." 

According to the National 
Center for Victims of 
Crimes, Web site 

www.ncvc.org, (NCVC) 
domestic violence is not just 
categorized as physical 
abuse. It includes emotion- 
al, mental and financial 
abuse as well; which is often 



the most difficult abuse to 
recognize. This abuse does 
not blacken your eye or 
wreck your home. This 
abuse is often insults, put 
downs and/or controlling of 
financial means. 

The vigil highlights the 
survivors who have the 
courage to stand and speak 
in front of many people who 
show up each year. These 
survivors are given the 
chance to elaborate upon 
their personal experiences 
to the assembled group. 
Survivors of abusive situa- 
tions point to the amount of 
courage it takes to stand in 
front of strangers. 



According to statistics 
from SAFE, one in four peo- 
ple will experience domestic 
violence in their lives. 
NCVC recommends ways 
to ' .respond if^ you are 
approached by « victim for 
help. According to NCVC, 
'"psychological first aid" 
involves establishing a rap- 
port with the victim, gather- 
ing information for short 
term assessment and serv- 
ice delivery, and averting a 
potential state of crisis." 

Counseling for anyone 
dealing with domestic vio- 
lence is available through 
SAFE or PASSAGES pro- 
grams. 




FLAME TO FIRE 



Clarion Call file photo 

There was a strong turr)out in 2004. 



CUP adds winter intersession program 



Jeffry Richards 

Assistant Circulation Manager 

sjprichards@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 4 - Clarion 
University recently added a 
Winter Intersession 

Program to their program of 
studies. The intersession 
falls between the fall and 
spring semesters. It will run 
from Dec. 19 until Jan. 9, 
just over three weeks. 

"It is very much like pre- 
session, a lot of work in a 
very short amount of time," 
said Arthur J. Acton, Ph.D., 
assistant vice president for 
academic affairs and 
extended programs. 

The idea of a winter inter- 
session was proposed by a 



faculty member so that stu- 
dents would be able to pick 
up an extra class, raise a 
student's GPA, or even 
make up an extra class so 
that they are able to gradu- 
ate on time, making this 
program very beneficial to 
graduate students. 

This program is an on-line 
program and students are 
only able to take one class. 
No on-campus facilities or 
services will be available 
during this time. This 
includes the on-campus 
libraries. There is also a 
separate tuition charge, and 
no addition financial aid is 
available. 

"We hope the students will 
find this an opportunity 



that they find valuable," 
Acton said. 

Junior Ashley Evanick 
stated, "Yeah it's great. It 
provides students with an 
opportunity to get ahead 



It is very much like 
presession, a lot of 
work in a very short 
amount of time. 

- Dr. Arthur J. Acton 



with their education. I 
would do it, because I have 
other stuff going on during 



the summer so the summer 
classes take up more time." 

Sophmore Teddy Dunn 
commented on the new 
intersession saying, "You 
lost the hands on action, but 
you get it done quicker. I 
would rather do stuff on- 
line." He liked the fact that 
a student would not have to 
actually go to class in order 
to complete a course. 

Freshmen Elyse Marlier 
and Stacey Grapkowski said 
this about the program. "It's 
winter break. You only have 
so much time off," said 
Marlier. Grapkowski fol- 
lowed her stating, "I don't 
like it because the on cam- 
pus libraries and services 
are not available." 




The Clarion Call provides a synopsis of all criminal 
investigations as conducted by the Clarion University 

Public Safety for the months of September and 

October 2005. All information can be accessed on the 

Public Safety Web page. 

■ Jonathan Weber, 18, of Clarion, Pa. and Jordon 
Andrulonis, 18, of Clarion, Pa., were both cited for 
causing damage to an elevator in Nair Hall on Sept. 
29. 

■ Brandon Murphy, 19, of Bakerstown, Pa., at about 
i:i4 a.m. on Sept. 30, was seen staggering in Lot 5 by 
university police. Murphy was issued citations for 
underage consumption and public drunkenness. 

■ Joshua Hill, 19, of Lewistown, Pa., was stopped for 
an equipment violation on Oct. 3. Hill was under the 
influence of alcohol and was in possession of an open 
container of alcohol. 



"PUBUC SAFETT' contlnuwl 
tnm front pagB 

locked. 

Undercover cops have also 
been used to make arrests 
for burglary. "We are active, 
we have security aids, cam- 
eras and we're not afraid to 
use undercover cops," said 
Tedjeske. 

"I think they (Public 
Safety of Clarion 

University) do a very good 
job because they have the 
alert booths all over cam- 
pus, and I always see cam- 
pus police driving around. 
Once those robberies hap- 
pened on Main Street, there 
were postings immediately 
placed on campus and 
escorts were available," said 
sophomore Brandon Long. 

With similar thoughts, 
freshman Jo Marie Rankin 
said, "We are constantly get- 
ting emails about the securi- 
ty or crimes that are going 
on, so we know how to take 
action and try to protect 
ourselves." 

The security report also 
shows three cases of arson 
which occurred in 2002 
between Nov. 7, and Nov. 21. 
These incidents involved a 
fire in a garbage can, the 
ignition of a bulletin board, 
and also toilet paper being 
set on fire. These events 
occurred in Nair, which 
ceased after an arrest was 
made after the third fire. 
There have been no reported 
incidents of arson since 
2002. 

One murder was also 
recorded in the statistics 
which occurred in 2002. In 
this incident, a 19-year old 
student was charged with 
criminal homicide in the 
death of her new-born baby 
that was discovered outside 
of Becht residence hall, in a 
trash bin. No incidents of 
murder or negligent 
manslaughter have 

occurred since this incident. 
Two arrests for weapons 
occurred in 2002, while none 
transpired in 2003. 
However, in 2004 three 
arrests were made concern- 
ing weapons. In one 
instance, pictures were post- 
ed on the internet of two 



students in a residence hall, 
with what seemed to be 
weapons. These students 
were then investigated. 
Police then found knives 
and other illegal weapons in 
their room, and they were 
arrested. 

Also, in 2004, a faculty 
member noticed a gun on 
the waistband of a student 
and reported this. The stu- 
dent was then arrested. 

"I feel safe at Clarion 
because security really 
seems to be on top of 
things," said freshman 
Sarah Dent. 

As opposed to the 37 
arrests made in 2001 involv- 
ing drugs, 16 arrests were 
made in 2004. "Resident 
Assistants calling or the 
results of a traffic stop are 
primarily the ways we are 
made aware of drugs," said 
Tedjeske. 

The most arrests, howev- 
er, involved liquor law defi- 
ances. In 2004, 93 arrests 
were made on campus con- 
cerning alcohol. "My policy 
has been the same since I 
got here. My officers do not 
have discretion for charges 
against liquor laws. If 
there's enough for a case, 
then they [the suspect] are 
charged," said Tedjeske. 

Tedjeske, who formerly 
worked for Penn State 
University and Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania, 
said, "I have been working 
on campuses for 17 years. I 
see a correlation between 
alcohol and drug use and 
crime. If the university 
works to actively address 
alcohol and drug problems, 
serious crimes won't occur." 
While these annual 
reports make it possible to 
more easily compare statis- 
tics between universities, 
Tedjeske says he's only com- 
paring Clarion against 
itself 

These crime reports are 
compiled in accordance with 
the provisions of the Jeanne 
Clery Disclosure of Campus 
Security Policy and Crime 
Statistics Act. A report is 
also published in compli- 
ance with Act 1988-73, the 
College and University 
Security Information Act. 



OCTOBER BLOOD DRIVES FOR CLARION COUNTY 
Thursday, Oct. 13 - Union High School, Rimersburg 
Friday, Oct. 14 - Redbanit High School, New Bethlehem 
Monday, Oct. 24 - Clarion American Legion, Clarion 
Thursday, Oct. 27 - Owens, Brocltway Clubhouse 



V. 



>) 



t 



October 6. 2005 



TmCLAMONCALL 



Page 3 



l/IMilB 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmeil Student Complex, Clarion, PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

Web: clarioncall.clarion.edu E-mail: cail®clarion.edu 

Executive Board 



Tom McMeeldn, 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dan Edington, 
Managing Editor 

John Santa, 
News Editor 

Ashley E. Angle, 
Features Editor 

Josh Woods, 
Sports Editor 

Jeannette Good, 
Copy & Design Editor 



Melissa Holiier, 
Photography Editor 

Jamie Flanagan, 
Business Manager 

Chelsey Hummel, 
Ad Sales Manager 

Ashley Boynes, 
Advertising Designer 

Tina Sickler, 
On-line Editor 

Paul Anderson, 
Circulation Manager 



Staff 

Lorie Abraham, Ryan Aloia, Ambri Alexander, Jennifer Angelos, 
Michael Balchin, Kerri Ballina, David Banks, Adam Bauer, Eddie 
Baumcratz, tfason Bice, Elisa Borger, Eric Bowser, Kurt Boyd. 
Brandi Brady, Katie BuUers, Daniel Burr, Kiiaberly Cammuso, 
Ashley Carter, Tyler Crissman, Jonathan Cofer, Kevin Colonna, 
Ryan Cornman, Lisa Covington, Brandon Devennie, Hilary Dieter, 
Jonathan Donelli, Jeffrey Donston, Jonathan Egbert, Lori Elmquiat, 
Katie Fischer. Audrey Fiske, Danielle Gais, Shawn Glancy. Lindsay 
Grystar, Grant Herrnberger, Chris Hofer, Robjm Holz, Sara Hoover, 
Andy Johnson, Jennifer Kalgren, Emma Kelly, Beth Kibler, Brittnee 
Koebler, Jason Kooser, Shasta Kurtz, Joe Kuazaj, Lauren Macek, 
Michael Marcello, Chris McKiseick, Nicole Meyer, Heather Moore, 
Megan MuUins, Karen Nicodemus. Cheyenne Patterson, Mollie 
Pifer, Morris Pratt, Elizabeth Presutti, Gayathri Rajendran, Zach 
Ramsey, Stephanie Rawson, Ryan Rhoades, Jeffry Richards, Sarah 
Roesch, Roberta Rosati, Lisa Sagan, Lindsey Schnieder, Jared 
Sheatz, Vicki Sheeler, Jennifer Shetter, Melody Simpson, Nathan 
Stahlman, Kristen Staley, Darrell Stanyard, Marc Steigerwald, Tom 
Steinhagen. Lindsay Sturgeon, Kirwin Sutherland, Matt Tbpolski, 
Steve Trichtinger, Ariel Weaver, Kevin Wetter, Pam Wherry, Amber 
White, Jimi Wikander, Ryan Wolfe, Devon Yorkshire, Jessica 
Zelinsky 

Policies 

The Clarion Call is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding commimities. The 
Call is published most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the 
right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; 
the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They 
must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author of a let" 
ter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter 
of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are pubhshed only based on 
available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Comraimication majors may earn a print cq-ciurricular as a mem- 
ber of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when 
scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsibilities 
for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the Clarion 
Students" Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One copy 
is free! additional copies are $1.00. 

■ Opinions expressed in this publica- 
tion are those of the v^rriter or speaker, 
and do not necessarily reflect the opin- 
ions of the newspaper staff, student 
body, Clarion University or the com- 
munity. 



Correction" 
In the Sept. 29 edition of The Clarion Call, the 
story "Golden Eagle band gets sousaphones" said the 
Department of Music requested the instruments. The 
request was actually made by the Golden Eagle 
Marching Band, which is a separate recognized stu- 
dent organization. The Clarion Call regrets the error. 



Knowing current events is criticai 



S^If§lfii|^li 




Jeannette Good 

Copy and Design Editor 

sjmgood®clarion.edu 

Before Hurricane Katrina 
hit, a professor asked anoth- 
er girl and me if we'd heard 
anything new about the 
hurricane. Her response 
was simple, "What hurri- 
cane?" I would find it hard 
to believe at this point that 
there is one person who 
doesn't know about Katrina. 
However, what about FEMA 
and all of the problems? 
What about the London 
bombings that occurred this 
summer? 

I got my kick in the face 
last year when I applied for 
internships at newspapers 
and needed to know current 
events. Also, my roommate 
is very politically minded 
and aware. It was hard for 
me to keep much of a con- 
versation with her and not 
feel blatantly stupid. Since 
then, I've listened, watched 
and read more. I watch the 
news in the morning; I read 



the newspaper when possi- 
ble. Last semester I read 
The New York Times almost 
everyday. Why do you care? 
Because it matters. 
Knowing politics or what is 
going on is critical. Many 
things going on in our coun- 
try and government today 
directly affect the majority 
of students at Clarion 
University. 

How can we allow our- 
selves to grow so simple and 
narrow-minded? I under- 
stand that students are 
training for positions in 
future careers and some- 
times get caught up in all of 
the work and involvement. 
It's not an excuse. When so 
much of education is based 
on history, are we forgetting 
to learn about the present 
day we live in? 

I'm a busy person. I'm fin- 
ishing a double major. I 
often don't have time, but I 
prioritize so I can follow cur- 
rent events. Many students 
do not seem to do so. 

It bothers me that profes- 
sors passed out issues of 
The Clarion Call and held 
an entire lecture about 
Jason Bice's article "Have 
fun at home on weekends." 
Since when is there time for 
such a thing? Major events 
occurred this semester, 
school-wide and nationwide, 
but I have yet to hear about 
any of it in a class. I have 



(( 



Do yourself a favor: 
read the policy box. 



» 



yet to hear of anyone else on 
campus hearing about it in a 
class. 

The policy of The Clarion 
Call states, "Opinions 
expressed in this paper are 
those of the writer or speak- 
er, and do not necessarily 
reflect the opinions of the 
newspaper staff, student 
body. Clarion University or 
the community." Do yourself 
a favor: read the policy box. 

Otherwise, if you're my 
friend and you stop me to 
voice your opinion about 
something in this paper, I'll 
listen. I'll listen even if you 
aren't my friend. There is a 
line, though. Don't cross it. 
Don't go with five people to 
gang up on one person. 

What did Bice's column 
mask? The school had to 
severely cut employees and 
costs, due to budget cuts. Is 
it that hard to notice that 
we are so cheap now that 
professors can't pass out 
paper syllabi? Few students 
even stop to wonder why 
this is. A graduate student's 
body was found less than 
two weeks before school 
started. Once school started, 
there was very little talk of 



it at all. 

It bothers me that we 
allow some not-as-impor- 
tant issues to mask larger, 
more important issues. 
Abortion has been a mask- 
ing issue nationally, as 
Bice's column has been a 
masking issue campus- 
wide. 

Supreme Court Justice 
Sandra Day O'Connor 
stepped down on July 1. 
Chief Justice William 
Rehnquist passed away on 
Sept. 3. President George W. 
Bush appointed John G. 
Roberts Jr. who since 
became the new chief jus- 
tice, and Bush just appoint- 
ed Harriet E. Miers. It's 
rare for a president to have 
the opportunity to appoint a 
new justice in the first 
place. Yet, President Bush 
has had the opportunity to 
appoint two new justices. 
The Supreme Court is cru- 
cial at this time because of 
the possible overturn of Roe 
V. Wade, the case that cur- 
rently allows abortion. 

My point is simple^ we're 
so one-track. Sometimes we 
lose sight of the big picture, 
leaving us to dwell on the 
smaller, less important 
things. 

The author is a senior 
communication/music edu- 
cation major. 



Language skills important in real life situations 




Julia Perry 



There's an old saying about 
how no one ever forgets 
their first love. I know I'll 
never forget mine. At the 
age of 12 I proclaimed my 
love for one of the sexiest 
languages on earth, 
Spanish. In eighth grade I 
bought my first Spanish 
album by late Mexican 
artist Selena Quintanilla 
Perez titled "Todos Mis exi- 
tos" (All my hits). With 
lyrics printed from the 
internet, I sang the words to 
"Tu robaste mi corazon" 
(You stole my heart) and my 
favorite, "No quiero saber" (I 
don't want to know). 

I enrolled at Clarion as a 
Spanish and English major. 
At the end of my sophomore 
year, I asked my advisor 
when Spanish 340 would be 
offered. "How many years 
are you going to be here?" he 
asked. "Maybe two and a 
half," I replied. I was infuri- 



ated because the classes I 
needed weren't being 
offered. I didn't want to wait 
around staying in school 
longer than necessary until 
the course was offered. My 
advisor suggested that I 
take French classes. 

Spanish will always be my 
first love. I must admit after 
my sophomore year I did 
have a little crush on 
French. I took French I and 
II. When I went to register 
for French III, I learned that 
the class wasn't being 
offered because there was 
no one to teach it. Soon I 
found myself perusing the 
Web sites of other universi- 
ties like Temple and Pitt, 
which offer many more 
Spanish classes than 
Clarion, not to mention 
classes in Italian and 
Chinese. I wondered if these 
students had to wait around 
for their required classes to 
be offered. 

Although I haven't been 
able to take all the Spanish 
classes I wanted, I'm proud 
of the fact that the three 
Spanish professors we have 
at Clarion are doing the best 
they can. Dr. Vincent Spina, 
Dr. Katy 0' Donnell and Dr. 
Yun Shao have taught me a 
lot about the Spanish and 
Hispanic worlds. It's a 
shame that the department 




of modern languages doesn't 
have the funds to fully meet 
the needs of its students 
because what we learn in 
the classroom can definitely 
be applied to real life situa- 
tions. This summer I 
worked as a film processor 
at K-mart where I put my 
knowledge learned in class 
to use. I came in contact 
with Spanish speakers daily 
at K-mart. Some of these 
Latinos can't speak English, 
so they're happy when they 
discover I can speak 
Spanish and understand 
them. 

Hispanics are now the 
largest minority group in 
the U.S. Their music is 
played constantly on hit 
radio stations across the 
nation. Latino rappers like 
Daddy Yankee, Fat Joe and 
Pit Bull are collaborating 
with top hip hop artists like 
Nelly and Lil Jon. The 
videos of Columbian artist 
Shakira are played on MTV 



even though she's singing in 
Spanish. 

After Spanish, the third 
most spoken language in the 
U.S. is Chinese. They ar« 
carving out their little niche 
in the U.S. as well. 

Everyone in the world 
doesn't speak English. If the 
administrators of Clarion 
want to prepare us to suc- 
ceed in this world, they need 
to equip us with a language. 
Companies are now seeking 
individuals who are fluent 
in other languages besides 
English. If you can speak a 
second language you stand a 
much better chance of get- 
ting a job. If the university 
continues to decrease the 
funding for the department 
of modern languages, they 
are decreasing the chances 
for Clarion University stu- 
dents to survive in a multi- 
lingual country as well. 

The author is a senior 
Spanish and English major. 




Reader responds to 
recent columns 

I must confess that I 
rarely read opinion pieces in 
any paper. I find that they 
are very seldom informa- 
tive, are usually poorly writ- 
ten and not occasionally 
foolish. However, after hav- 
ing been recently subjected 
to the writing of Jason Bice, 
and because of the outrage 



that his opinion pieces 
evoked in a substantial part 
of the Clarion student body, 
I have found a new standard 
by which drivel will be 
judged. 

I have always been, and 
will always be, a supporter 
of anyone's right to speak 
their mind regardless of 
how small it might be. 
However, it seems to be a 
common misconception that 
"free speech" and the "free 
press" are one and the same. 
Freedom of speech guaran- 
tees that an individual will 
not be tossed in jail or forfeit 
their rights as a citizen for 
expressing their views. It 
does not guarantee that any 



individual must be given a 
platform from which to 
make their proclamations. 
That right must be earned! 
Although, in America 
there is an outlet for any- 
thing someone wants to say 
if they look hard enough. I 
think that if Mr. Bice works 
very hard on the technical 
skills of his writing, perhaps 
he could become a marginal- 
ly competent writer for 
"Hustler," "Penthouse," var- 
ious restricted Web sites or 
most network television pro- 
grams. He does not have 
any business in anything 
that professes to be a "news" 
outlet. 

Freedom of the press 



means that publications are 
free to print anything that 
they see fit to, without being 
restricted by the govern- 
ment or other outside forces. 
The above raises the issue of 
responsibility. Mr. Bice was 
clearly not imparting any 
information that is of use to 
the Clarion University com- 
munity. Where were the edi- 
tors? Why did they not say, 
"we will use our freedom of 
the press to say no to this 
joker, and put something 
worthwhile in the space he 
would waste?" 

Perhaps I am being too 
harsh. Perhaps Bice just has 
a tasteless sense of humor, 
and the editorial staff, 



knowing this, read the 
whole of his articles as if 
they were the material of a 
really bad stand-up comic. 
Unfortunately, there is 
nothing funny about Bice's 
jokes. 

I have since had a chance 
to hear from some people 
that know Bice personally 
and, even though they were 
uniformly offended by his 
articles, they all say that he 
is a good guy. I have also 
had the opportunity to look 
at Bice's blogs. 

After reading all of his 
material, I feel that Bice is 
only somewhat more obnox- 
ious to women than he is to 
anyone else. Mr. Bice does 



clearly understand the easi- 
est way to get attention: 
pander to the lowest com- 
mon denominator of your 
audience. Wit takes work, 
and does not attract as 
much attention even when 
done I do not withdraw any 
of my assertions, but it is 
nice to know that you are a 
good guy, Mr. Bice. I prefer 
people of benevolent igno- 
rance to those of malevolent 
intent, even if they say the 
same foolish things. 

-Robert Shoemaker, 
student 



Letters to the Editor 
continue on page 5 



Page 4 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



October 6, 2005 




Ashley Boynes 
Advertising Designer 

s_amboynes@clarion.eclu 



If you're happy and 
you know It ... 

If you are happy and you know it, clap your hands! 
No, in all seriousness ... when you are happy, why do 
others insist on putting a damper on the situation? 

You love your new hair color, but your friend has to 
point out that the cut isn't for you. Or you are super 
excited about your new faux Prada bag, and someone 
has to point out that it's fake (as though you didn't 

know.) Or the ubiquitous 
situation where you are 
dating somebody, but your 
friends or family insist on 
pointing out their every 
flaw. Why do people do 
this? Yes, it's quite annoy- 
ing... but the worst is 
when people say, "As long 
as you are happy..." or "I 
just want you to be 
happy." Obviously, there 
is nothing wrong with it 
on the surface, but the 
problem is, most people 
are lacking the sentiment 
behind it. 

Yes, this is something 
I've noticed within the 
past year or so. People are 
always wishing you happiness, but it is almost like 
they only want you to be happy if it is on their own 
individual terms, or at their personal convenience. For 
example^ 

ALL your best friend wants is for you to be happy 
with your new beau ... really ... as long as it does not 
lessen the amount of "best friend" time you two have 
together. Your boss "truly" wants you to be happy and 
will work around your schedule ... as long as it is con- 
venient for him and his needs. Your parents want you 
to be happy and go to college ... as long as you gradu- 
ate from their alma mater or their university of choice. 
Your family is SO HAPPY you are engaged ... as long 
as the potential spouse meets their 
religious/racial/financial/age expectations and stan- 
dards. Your peers respect your religion and are happy 
that you are so engrossed in it... as long as you don't 
talk about it in front of them. If someone wishes you 
happiness under certain conditions only, then they are 
just being self-satisfying and not wanting pure happi- 
ness for you. Sure, they may truly want you to be 
happy... but they want a piece of it too. So, if you are 
happy and it, in turn, makes them unhappy or uncom- 
fortable, then forget it. These people do not want you 
to be happy if the terms come to that, now do they? 

I have come to the conclusion that these people can 
actually affect your happiness. We cannot let these 
quasi-happiness-wishers put a strain on what fills us 
with joy! So, if you are in a situation similar to any of 
the above-mentioned... forget about it ... Uve your life, 
on your own terms. Move on. If you ARE happy and 
you know it, smile, and enjoy your bhss. If you are 
unhappy about something, change it even if it means 
upsetting someone else. People who TRULY want you 
to be happy WILL understand, even if it takes them 
awhile to come around. 

After all ... all they want is for you to be happy ... 
right? 

My apologies ... next issue's column (Oct. 13) will fea- 
ture the article about why women feel that they must 
wear makeup. Feel free to send me any comments on 
this topic! 



Alumni Association Scholarships available 



Applications are available at the Center for Advancement (on the corner of Corbett St. and Wilson 
Ave.) and are due at the center by Oct. 28. Up to $3,200 in scholarships will be awarded, and the 
remaining $3,000 may be awarded as leadership awards. 

Full-time undergraduates who have completed at least 30 credit hours prior to the 2006-2007 aca- 
demic year and will not be graduating before December 2006 are eligible. 



Auditions for "The Vagina Monologues" 



by Eve Ensler 

Mon. October 16 
Tues. October 17 
Thurs. October 19 



5:30 - 9 p.m. 
2-5 p.m. 
2-5 p.m. 



209 Harvey Hall Women's Studies Center 

Previous sign-ups for auditions required. Cold read - no prepared monologue needed. 



Dead leaves on the dirty ground 



Paul Anderson 
Circulation Manager 

s_pmanderson@clarlon.eclu 

I'm recovering from a 
hangover (ah, to be 22) and 
worrying about my dead- 
Une. Of all the things I could 
be worrying about — my 
stomach, which I've reached 
an uneasy truce with; my 
head, which is responding 
nicely to the aspirin I took; 
the world, which doesn't 
give a damn about me any- 
way — I've focused on my 
deadline. Over the summer, 
I wrote out all the columns 
for this semester, but 
haven't used one yet. 
Looking over them, they 
didn't work. The trials of a 
writer with a deadline — we 
can never think beyond the 
next one. 

Anyway, it's Autumn Leaf 
Festival and am I the only 
one noticing how morbid 
this Clarion event is? 
C'mon, we spend a week cel- 
ebrating how everything's 
dying and dead. Wheel 
Bring the kids, let's watch 
things die! Who's got the 
camera? 

As Clarion fills up with 
tourists and alumni for the 
week, we should really look 
at the week-long event 
known as Autumn Leaf 
Festival. It's morbid, first 
off, but we covered that. I 
love autumn more than any 
other season, but it doesn't 
make me want to throw a 
carnival for the fact — I tend 




to just enjoy looking at the 
sky. But that's me. Other 
participants in higher edu- 
cation here celebrate it with 
cheese-fries, buck-a-slice 
and drinking. What, did you 
honestly think that college 
students enjoyed A.L.F. for 
the changing foliage and 
abundant flavors of fudge? 

I was at the bar on "A.L.F. 
Eve" (what a dumbass 
term), hence the hangover 
now (it's only Saturday 
when I'm writing this in my 
office, hstening to 105.9 The 
X over the Internet), and it 
was packed. In spite of my 
anti-social tendencies, of 
which there are many, I 
enjoy going to the bar. I 
think a part of it may be my 
raging alcoholism (hi. 
Mom!), but a larger part of it 
may be to feel a bit human 
for once. 

I don't tend to like people 
much, as a rule — I don't 
make friends easily and 
have a hard time keeping up 
my side of a conversation 
with utter strangers 
because I couldn't care 
less — but I enjoy congregat- 
ing around others so I can at 
least pretend to be margin- 
ally normal. And what bet- 
ter time to go to the bar 



The 

Dumping 
,G round 



than at the beginning of 
A.L.R? 

Here's what I see at the 
bar; men in large groups, 
sometimes playing pool, 
sometimes just shooting the 
bull by the arcade games, all 
of them looking for someone 
to leave with. Men, as a 
rule, don't dress up and 
dance just for the experi- 
ence. They're looking for a 
woman for, depending on 
the man in question, a one- 
night stand or an actual 
relationship. But I have ht- 
tle love for my gender and 
think the former. How gen- 
eralizing of me, right? 
Whatever. 

Women also go to the bar 
in large groups and here's a 
bit of a problem; I've never 
been quite sure why. I've 
discussed this with a few 
people. Is it just for the 
experience of dressing up, 
dancing and having a night 
out with the girls? Is it to 
find a man? It seems that it 
can be both, hence my 
assumption that women are 
weird. But weird in a good 
way. 

Here's a side rant; I was 
disgusted to learn that there 
are still women who come to 
college merely for the task of 



finding a husband, thus 
turning Clarion into a ten* 
thousand-dollar-a-year ver- 
sion of Love Connection. 
While it's fine and dandy to 
want to think of the future, 
and there are people here 
who come to college because 
their parents force them to, 
I always tended to think 
that college should be career 
first and husband/wife 
searching second. But, as 
I've been told often, my way 
of thinking isn't all that 
mainstream. What a pity. 
However, I will now wish 
you ahead of time to have a 
Happy New Year and I hope 
1955 will be a good one for 
you. 

Anyway, I enjoy the bar 
even though, as a rule, I 
don't drink much, and I 
enjoy A.L.F. for the sheer 
fact that it seems to be noth- 
ing more than an excuse to 
drink heavily. -But I also 
realize that not everyone's 
legal and may be having fun 
under the radar. Be careful 
though. That's all I have to 
say 

And for those few shocked 
parents reading that, think- 
ing that their twenty-year- 
old child may be drinking 
illegally, I'd like to ask this; 
what were you doing at that 
age? Being fine and 
upstanding members of the 
community, I'm sure. 

Have an enjoyable A.L.F., 
friends and neighbors. 
Watch the corpses fall. 



Dance-offs are how real men solve disputes 



Jason Bice 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJabice@clarion.eclu 

Remember the old days 
when a dispute was 
resolved with a good old- 
fashioned punch to the face? 
Say "Willy Womanizer" was 
trying to put the moves on 
your girlfriend. You, and 
possibly some of your bud- 
dies, would take this fine 
gentleman to the side and 
calmly start beating the 
crap out of him. But now, 
thanks largely in part to the 
rise of the metrosexual and 
the release of the epic block- 
buster "You Got Served," 
things are different. Now 
things are settled with a 
"Dance-Off" 

Gone are the days of 
"Randy Roids" and "Peter 
Pecks" being the bullies. 
Their giant muscles only 
weigh them down when 
they are challenged to "take 
it to the streets," leaving the 
smaller, more limber oppo- 
nent with the faster feet to 
"serve" them. This not only 
levels the playing field but 
is also more amusing than 
watching some nerd get his 
butt kicked. 

"But, Jasor Bice, 1 don't 




<f. 



^/V*< 



f 




al)0(it t/vat . . , 



know the first thing about 
dancing off! What should I 
do?" 

Well, sir, the first thing 
you should do is go out and 
rent. . . no go out and buy the 
aforementioned 'You Got 
Served." For those of you 
who've been living under a 
rock, 'You Got Served" is 
the story of two break 
dancers and their dance 
team whose goal in life is to 
beat "Wade's crew", a rival 
dance group from Orange 
County. In the end their 
dancing proves superior and 
the boys get to star in a Lil 
Kim video. I give this movie 
the highest rating of all 
time. Its only downfall was 
that Steve Harvey, and not 
Tony Danza, played the part 
of Mr. Rad. Make sure you 
watch this movie 50 times 
before you even attempt a 
dance -off. 

"Ok Jason Bice, I watched 
the movie and it sucked! 



Now what?" 

You watch that damn 
movie again until you think 
it's the greatest movie 
you've ever seen! 

"Ok Jason Bice, that was 
the greatest movie 1 have 
ever seen in my life. Now 
what?" 

Now you wait for an 
opportunity to challenge 
someone. An opportunity is 
basically when you take 
exception to what someone 
is doing. How's this for an 
example? Suppose you're in 
the "Sex in the City" fan 
club and you reserved the 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
Room to watch season six. 
Unfortunately, when you 
get there, the geology club 
has already taken over and 
is having a mineral extrava- 
ganza. Oh well, looks like 
you'll all have to crowd into 
your little dorm room and 
watch season six, right? 
Hell no. You march in there 



and tell those geology nerds 
you're going to "rock" their 
socks off! (Get it "rock"? 
hahahaha... God, I'm lame.) 
Now it's on. From this 
point you can either go five 
on five or one on one. I usu- 
ally prefer one on one 
because I'm such a great 
dancer and don't want some 
slow-foot tarnishing my 
record. 

Basically, there are three 
rounds and three unbiased 
judges. Round one is the 
pure moves round. The time 
limit is the length of the 
song that the judges pick. 
You and your opponent bet- 
ter be ready to showcase 
some, not all, of your best 
moves in this round. 

When the song ends the 
both of you face the judges. 
Each of them tells you what 
they liked and they didn't 
like and end with a vote of 
who wins the round. Don't 
worry if you lose this round, 
though. If you're creative 
you can certainly make up 
for it in the second round. 

Round two is basically the 
same as round one but with 
one crucial difference - 
props! Not only are your 
moves reviewed but now 
you're judged on your choice 
of props and how you use 



them. So remember, if 
you're facing a geology kid 
and he pulls out a hand lens 
and his rock hammer, it's 
pretty much over unless you 
have something to combat 
it. When time is up in this 
round, you face the judges 
again and go through the 
same process as before. If 
after both rounds there is a 
tie, you must move on to 
round three. 

Now round three is where 
you show off the moves you 
didn't use in round one. Let 
me tell you about this round 
from my own experience. 

It was my first dance-off 
ever. What was worse was 
that one of the judges was 
one of the most famous 
dancers in Clarion, Dan 
Check. I also was at a disad- 
vantage being that I was 
facing a rather attractive 
girl and two of the judges 
were men. How was I to 
compete with that? 

As the music began for 
round one, I took a deep 
breath and started dancing 
all over the place. My choice 
moves are ridiculously quick 
feet and jazz hands. My 
opponent did the running 
man. It's plain to see who 
took the round! Jason Bice, 
that's who. 



Round two wasn't as suc- 
cessful. I tried using chop- 
sticks as my props but 
ended up poking myself in 
the eye. Meanwhile, my 
opponent just flaunted her 
large chest at the judges. 
Needless to say, we were fac- 
ing a tie and went on to 
round three. 

Round three is no cake- 
walk. You have to leave it all 
on the dance floor. We start- 
ed our respective moves and 
I could tell the judges were 
just not impressed. I knew I 
had to do something drastic. 
In between toe taps, I 
searched around the room. 
Then I had it. I quickly 
danced onto a chair and 
hopped from the chair on to 
the top of the meat freezer. 
The judges were astonished. 
Such a move had never been 
done. I tasted victory that 
day and it will remain with 
me the rest of my life. 

Anyway, the point of my 
story is that dance-offs are 
cool. They are so cool in fact 
that even lumberjacks and 
pirates partake of them. 
Therefore, if you want to be 
as cool as these men, gather 
up a crew and find someone 
to dance off against. Make 
sure to tell them, 'Tou got 
Served!" 



October 6. 2005 



THE CLARION CALL 



PafleS 



ti<' 




Presidential 
Commissions and 
STAR respond 

As part of the mission to 
foster a campus climate 
favorable to women, the 
Presidential Commission on 
the Status of Women, along 
with the other Presidential 
Commissions and STAR, 
would like to address the 
issue of recent Clarion Call 
editorial columns that pro- 
mote negative attitudes 
towards women. A recent 
article in The Call (Sept. 15, 
2005, "Have fun at home on 
the weekends," by Jason 
Bice) suggests that a "fun" 
and "cool" weekend for male 
students at Clarion 
University can be had by 
finding "some drunk girl" 
and having sex with her. "If 
she wakes up in the morn- 
ing and regrets it, let that 
be a lesson to her," the col- 
umn states. This can be 
interpreted as encouraging 
male students to commit 
the crime of date rape. 
Sexual relationships 

require consent. Seeking 
out someone who is drunk 
for the purpose of having 
sex with that person consti- 
tutes unethical, if not ille- 
gal, behavior. Female stu- 
dents cannot feel safe in an 
environment where they are 
seen as prey, with predators 
ready to take advantage of 
them whenever the occasion 
presents itself. 

In the Sept. 22 issue of 
The Clarion Call, Mr. Bice 
again expresses attitudes 
that are disrespectful to 
females. This column also 
reflects negative images of 
male students, giving the 



impression that our male 
students are only interested 
in drinking and using 
female students. In fact, the 
first two re-spondents in The 
Call to Jason Bice's column 
of Sept. 15 were both male 
students who were greatly 
offended to be depicted the 
way they were in that col- 
umn. The attitudes 
expressed in these columns 
cannot go unchallenged. 
Clarion University strives 
to create an environment 
that fosters respect for all 
individuals. To advocate 
irresponsible or potentially 
criminal behavior violates 
the principles for which 
Clarion University stands. 

It may be true that, for 
some young people, the col- 
lege years represent their 
first experience with inde- 
pendence. However, a stu- 
dent who is learning to live 
independently should be 
learning responsible and 
appropriate adult behav- 
iors. The behaviors suggest- 
ed in the cited articles are 
no joking matter and defi- 
nitely are not "cool." The 
ramifications of drunken 
behavior and date rape are 
not funny. Women may 
experience prolonged psy- 
chological distress, preg- 
nancy or sexually transmit- 
ted diseases. These ramifi- 
cations affect men as well. 
Learning responsible 

behaviors in regard to 
drinking and sexual rela- 
tionships is an important 
part of maturing. 

Tiie Clarion Call board 
and staff members should 
also realize that the atti- 
tudes expressed within the 
paper are transmitted to 
the entire campus, as well 
as off campus. A community 
member may take these 
"jokes" as a reflection of the 
kind of person they can 
expect to have in their com- 
munity. Needless to say, 



many community members 
will not view students posi- 
tively when they see such 
views. High school students 
deciding whether to attend 
Clarion University may 
read The Call and decide 
that if the university paper 
is willing to print such 
columns, this is not the 
place for them. This column, 
and others like it, promote 
attitudes that will harm 
others. 

Clarion University admin- 
istration, faculty, staff and 
students are committed to 
making this campus an 
environment in which young 
people can learn the skills 
and behaviors necessary for 
responsible roles in our soci- 
ety 

- The Presidential 
Commiaaion on the Status 

of Women and its chaira, 

Meliaaa K Downea and 

Laurie Occbipinti 

- The Preaidential 
Commiaaion on AfGrmative 
Action and ita chaira, Todd 

Lavin and Kaenten Colvin- 
Woodruff 

- The Preaidential 
Commisaion on Sexual 

Haraaament and ita chaira, 

Liaa Turner and Carl 

Callenhw^ 

- The Preaidential 
Commiaaion on Human 

Relatione and ita chaira, 

Mark Kilwein and Jocelynn 

Smrekar 

- The Preaidential 
Commiaaion on Diaabilitiea 

and ita chair, Shirley 
Johnaon 

- STAR (Studenta Together 

Againat Rape) and ita preai- 

dent, Idea Covington, and 

faculty adviaora, Kathy 

Fleiaaner and Cindy 

Kennedy 



HR 177 and Free 
Speech issues 

In the Sept. 8 edition of 
The Clarion Call, it was 
reported that HR 177 was 
adopted over the summer, 
meaning that a special com- 
mittee will begin combing 
state-affiliated colleges and 
universities for evidence of 
retribution, both subtle and 
overt, directed against stu- 
dents and faculty members 
whose ideological views dif- 
fer from those that have tra- 
ditionally been associated 
with institutions of higher 
learning. Or, more truthful- 
ly, the committee will begin 
the arduous task of ferret- 
ing out all the liberalism 
that infects any given cam- 
pus to the detriment of 
those who wish to voice an 
opposing doctrine. All this 
is to play out under the 
guise of protecting free 
speech. 

The standard-bearer for 
HR 177, Gibson Armstong 
(R, Lancaster County), 
pointed out that the resolu- 
tion was a bi-partisan ani- 
mal, but he failed to qualify 
that assertion with the 
numbers-of the nearly four- 
dozen sponsors, only a 
handful were democrats. 
This degree of commitment 
more closely resembles trep- 
idation than it does zeal, as 
well it should. 

College campuses have 
long been held to be bas- 
tions of free exchange, and 
not without reason. 



Certainly the term "liberal- 
ism" implies as much, just 
as "conservatism" implies 
constraint. So in order to 
stamp out the liberal mes- 
sage that so offends 
Armstrong, he must under- 
mine the mechanism that he 
claims to embrace. No way 
of thinking is more erro- 
neous, except for the notion 
that handcuffing professors 
and feeding the fire of 
hype"-sensitivity will ulti- 
mately make the education- 
al process more fruitful. 

Armstrong claims an ally 
in his fight-the Foundation 
for Individual Rights in 
Higher Education (FIRE). 
He didn't bother to let this 
alliance simply remain dubi- 
ous, but instead went out of 
his way to make assurances 
that FIRE could not be 
assailed as "being some 
right-wing nut group," 
which immediately drew my 
suspicion. 

Fortunately, when I 
browsed through FIRE's 
website (www.thefire.org). I 
was able to get a sense of the 
outfit's non-partisan 

approach that Armstrong 
lauded: "Illiberal university 
policies and practices must 
be exposed to public criti- 
cism and scrutiny so that 
the public is made aware of 
the violations of basic rights 
that occur every day on col- 
lege campuses." Slyly using 
the term "illiberal" kind of 
says it all. 

- Henry Guthrie, 
atudent 



"Corpse Bride" movie 
not worth five leaves 

I have a bone to pick with 
movie reviewer Nathan 
Stahlman. How can you 
give "Corpse Bride" five 
leaves? 

I just went to see this 
movie last Friday, and 
although I walked out of the 
movie saying, "It was a good 
movie," it definitely was not 
worth five leaves, unless it's 
out of 10. There were a lot of 
discrepancies in the movie. 

The major discrepency was 
that when Victor was prac- 
ticing his vows in the forest 
and put the ring on Emily's 
finger, she came out of the 
ground and nearly chased 
him around town. However, 
when they both wanted to 
come back to the living 
world to meet his parents, 
she had to go to that old 
man to do so. Furthermore, 
when they did get up there 
she was like, "It's been so 
long since I've seen the 
moonlight." Please! She was 
just up there chasing him. 

OK, maybe this isn't a dis- 
crepancy, but the movie just 
ended and I wanted to know 
more. I hope Tim Burton 
doesn't believe this story 
needs a sequel. I hope that 
Mr. Stahlman would pay 
more attention to the movie 
instead of what's going on 
around him. Yeah, I read 
your other article as well. 

-LaAja Wiggina, 
atudent 





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LEGAL NOTICE 



If you rented U-Haul moving equipment from a U-Haul center or Independent dealer 

in the state of Pennsylvania after August 7, 1992 and were charged for a second 

rental term despite returning the equipment within 24 hours, then you are 

a member of a Class Action Lawsuit against U-Haul International, Inc, 

and its subsidiary U-Haul Company of Pennsylvania, Inc. 

You are not being sued, The class is suing U-Haul for a refund of any improper 

charaes. There has not yet been any determination of the merits of the lawsuit 

The defendants deny any liability. You will be bound by the result of this 

lawsuit unless you exclude yourself from the Class. 

If you exclude yourself you will not be entitled to share in any recovery but 
you will still have the right to file your own lawsuit. 



If you do not wish to be a member of the Class, you must say that you do not want to be a 

member of the class by letter or post card (postmarked on or before December 15, 2005) 

sent to U-Haul Litigation, RO. Box 2081, Philadelphia. PA 19103. You must sign the 

correspondence and print your name, address and telephone number. 

If you do nothing, you will continue to be a member of the Class and your 
rights will be determined by the result of the case. 

You can obtain additional information about this lawsuit and your rights by calling 

1-877-745-4148 or by visiting www.UHAULPennsylvaniaLitigation.com . 

You can also call or e-mail any one of plaintiffs' three attorneys; 

Michael Gehring - 215-814-6750 - mgehring(S)bolognese-law.com 

Richard D. Greenfield - 410-745-4149 - whitehatrdg@earthlink.net 

Ann Caldwell - 215-248-2030 - acaldwell@classactlaw.com 

Reference: Boyle, et al. v. U-Haul International, Ltd., et al., August Term 
1998. No. 0840 (Court of Common Pleas, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) 




Stephanie Cooper 

Senior, Education 

"Getting 'crazy' with my friends from here 
and back home." 



Vanessa Benkov ich 
Freshman, Business Financinc; 

"Watching the floats at the parade." 





Sara Hoover 
and Jenna Angelos 

g ^^^"^— — ■^w^" ■'■■! ■■'■ LM IlilJIMl^B 

"What is your favorite 

thing about A.L.R, 

besides the 

Poor Man's 

caramel apples?" 




Carlos Burns 

Freshman, Psychology 

"The funnel cakes." 



Brian Pinkney 

SiNioR, Sphixh Communication 

"The overabundance of beautiful women. 
I really love women." 




Anna Goldman 
Senior, Secondary Education Math 

"Walking around with wing sauce 
all over my face!" 



A J Graves 

Freshman, Business Management 

"The Louisiana chicken" 




•^B 



wmmmmt 



Page 4 



TOE CLARION CALL 



October 6. 2005 



i 



October 6^2005 




Ashley Boynes 
Advertising Designer 

'- ,inih(iviies®clarion.edu 



If you're happy and 
you know It ... 

If you arc happy and ymi know it. clap your hands! 
No. in all seriousness ... when you are happy, why do 
others insi.st on piittinji a damper on the situation? 

You love your new hair color, hut your friend has to 
point out that the cut isn't for you. Or you are super 
excited ahout your new faux Prada hag. and someone 
has to point out that it's fake (as though you didn't 

know.) Or the uhitiuitous 
situation where you are 
dating somehody. but your 
friends or family insist on 
pointing out their every 
tlaw. Why do people do 
this? Yes, it's quite annoy- 
ing... but the worst is 
when people say, "As long 
as you are happy..." or "1 
just want you to be 
happy." Obviously, there 
is nothing wrong with it 
on the siu'face. but the 
prohletn i.s. most people 
are lacking the sentiment 
behind it. 

Yes. this is something 
_— i—— ->———— ^.^ I've noticed within the 

past year or so. People are 
always wishing you happiness, but it is almost like 
they only want you to be happy if it is on their own 
individual terms, or at their personal convenience. For 
example^ 

ALL your best friend wants is for you to he happy 
with your new beau ... really ... as long as it does not 
lessen the amount of "best friend" time you two have 
together. Your boss "truly" wants you to be happy and 
will work around your schedule ... as long as it is con- 
venient for him and his needs. Your parents want you 
to he happy and go to college ... as long as you gradu- 
ate from their alma mater or their university of choice. 
Your family is SO HAPPY you are engaged ... as long 
as the potential spouse meets their 
religiou.s/racial/financial/age expectations and stan- 
dards. Your peers respect your religion and are happy 
that you are so engrossed in it... as long as you don't 
talk about it in front of them. If someone wishes you 
happiness under certain conditions only, then they are 
just being self-satisfying and not wanting pure happi- 
ness for you. Sure, they may truly want you to be 
happy... but they want a piece of it too. So. if you are 
happy and it, in turn, makes them unhappy or uncom- 
fortable, then forget it. These people do not want you 
to be happy if the terms come to that, now do they? 

I have come to the conclusion that these people can 
actually affect your happiness. We cannot let these 
quasi-happiness-wishers put a strain on what fills us 
with joy! So. if you are in a situation similar to any of 
the above-mentioned... forget about it ... live your life, 
on your own terms. Move on. If you ARE happy and 
you know it, smile, and enjoy your bliss. If you are 
unhappy about something, change it even if it means 
upsetting someone else. People who TRULY want you 
to be happy WILL understand, even if it takes them 
awhile to come around. 

After all ... all they want is for you to be happy ... 
right? 

My apologies ... next issue's column (Oct. 13) will fea- 
ture the article ahout why women feel that they must 
wear makeup. Feel free to send me any comments on 
this topic! 



Alumni Association Scholarships available 



Apphcations are available at the Center for Advancement (on the corner of Corbett St. and Wilson 
Ave.) and are due at the center by Oct. 28. Up to $3,200 in scholarships will be awarded, and the 
remaining $3,000 may be awarded as leadership awards. 

Full-time undergraduates who have completed at least 30 credit hours pnor to the 2006-2007 aca- 
demic year and will not be graduating before December 2006 are eligible. 



Auditions for "The Vagina Monologues" 



by Eve Ensler 

Mon. October 16 
Tues. October 17 
Thurs. October 19 



5:30 -9 p.m. 
2-5 p.m. 
2 - 5 p.m. 



209 Harvey Hall Women's Studies Center 

Previous sign-ups for auditions required. Cold read - no prepared monologue needed. 



Dead leaves on the dirty ground 



Paul Anderson 
Circulation Manager 

s_^pmc3nderson(S'Clanon.e(lii 

I'm recovering,' tVoni a 
hangover (ah. to be 22) and 
worrying about my dead- 
hne. Of all the things 1 could 
be worrying about — my 
stomach, which I've reacherl 
an uneasy truce with: my 
head, which is respondnig 
nicely to the aspirin I took: 
the world, which doesn't 
give a damn about me any- 
way — I've focused on m\- 
deadline. Over the summer. 
I wrote out all the columns 
for this semester, but 
haven't used one yet. 
Looking over them, they 
didn't work. The trials of a 
writer with a deadline — we 
can never think beyond the 
next one. 

Anyway, it's Autumn Leaf 
Festival and am I the only 
one noticing how morbid 
this Clarion event is? 
C'mon, we spend a week cel- 
ebrating how every thmgs 
dying and dead. Wheel 
Bring the kids, let's watch 
things die! Who's got the 
camera? 

As Clarion fills up with 
tourists and alumni for the 
week, we should really look 
at the week-long event 
known as Autumn Leaf 
Festival. It's morbid, first 
off. but we covered that. I 
love autumn more than any 
other season, but it doesn't 
make me want to throw a 
carnival for the fact — 1 tend 




to just enjoy looking at the 
sky. But that's me. Other 
participants in higher edu- 
cation here celebrate it with 
cheese-fries. buck-a-slice 
and drinking. What, did you 
honestly think that college 
>tudents enjoyed A.L.F. for 
the changing foliage and 
abundant tlavors of fudge? 

I was at the bar on "A.L.F. 
Fat" (what a dumbass 
term), hence the hangover 
now (it's only Saturday 
when I'm writing this in my 
office, listening to 105.9 The 
X over the Internet), and it 
was packed. In spite of my 
anti-social tendencies, of 
vvhich there are many. I 
enjoy going to the bar. I 
think a part of it may be my 
raging alcoholism (hi. 
Mom I), but a larger part of it 
may be to feel a bit human 
lor once. 

I don't tend to hke people 
much, as a rule — I don't 
make friends easily and 
have a hard time keeping up 
my side of a conversation 
with utter strangers 
because I couldn't care 
less — but I enjoy congregat- 
ing around others so I can at 
least pretend to be margin- 
ally normal. And what bet- 
ter time to go to the bar 



The 
Dumping 

Ground 



than at the beginning of 
A.L.F.'.' 

Here's what I see at the 
bar: men in large groups, 
sometimes playing pool, 
sometimes just shooting the 
bull by the arcade games, all 
of them looking for someone 
to leave with. Men, as a 
rule, don't dress up and 
dance just for the experi- 
ence. They're looking for a 
woman for. depending on 
the man in question, a one- 
night stand or an actual 
relationship. But I have lit- 
tle love for my gender and 
think the former. How gen- 
eralizing of me. right? 
Whatever. 

Women also go to the bar 
in large groups and here's a 
bit of a problem: I've never 
been quite sure why. I've 
discussed this with a few- 
people. Is it just for the 
experience of dressing up. 
dancing and having a night 
out with the girls? Is it to 
find a man? It seems that it 
can be both, hence my 
assumption that women are 
weird. But weird in a good 
way. 

Here's a side rant: I was 
disgusted to learn that there 
are still women who come to 
college merely for the task of 



finding a husband, thus 
turning Clarion into a ten- 
thousand-dollara-year ver- 
sion of Love Connection. 
While it's fine and dandy to 
want to think of the future, 
and there are people here 
who come to college because 
their parents force them to, 
I always tended to think 
that college should be career 
first and husband/wife 
searching second. But, as 
I've been told often, my way 
of thinking isn't all that 
mainstream. What a pity. 
However, I will now wish 
you ahead of time to have a 
Happy New Year and I hope 
1955 will be a good one for 
you. 

Anyway, I enjoy the bar 
even though, as a rule, I 
don't drink much, and I 
enjoy A.L.F. for the sheer 
fact that it seems to be noth- 
ing more than an excuse to 
drink heavily. But I also 
realize that not everyone's 
legal and may be having fun 
under the radar. Be careful 
though. That's all I have to 
say. 

And for those few shocked 
parents reading that, think- 
ing that their twenty-year- 
old child may be drinking 
illegally. I'd like to ask this: 
what were you doing at that 
age? Being fine and 
upstanding members of the 
community. I'm sure. 

Have an enjoyable A.L.F., 
friends and neighbors. 
W^atch the corpses fall. 



Dance-offs are how real men solve disputes 



Jason Bice 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjabice@clarion.edu 

Remember the old days 
when a dispute was 
resolved with a good old- 
fashioned punch to the face? 
Say "Willy Womanizer" was 
trying to put the moves on 
your girlfriend. You. and 
]3ossibly some of your bud- 
dies, would take this fine 
gentleman to the side and 
calmly start beating the 
crap out of him. But now. 
thanks largely in part to the 
rise of the metrosexual and 
the release of the epic block- 
buster "You Got Served." 
things are different. Now 
things are settled with a 
"Dance-Off." 

Gone are the days of 
"Randy Roids" and "Peter 
Pecks" being the bullies. 
Their giant muscles only 
weigh them down when 
they are challenged to "take 
it to the street.s." leaving the 
smaller, more limber oppo- 
nent with the faster feet to 
"serve" them. This not only 
levels the playing field but 
is also more amusing than 
w-atching some nerd get his 
butt kicked. 

"But. Jasor Bice. I don't 




<f. 



^/V^. 



f 




dodt tkat . . . 



know the first thing about 
dancing off! What should I 
do?" 

Well. sir. the first thing 
you should do is go out and 
rent... no go out and buy the 
aforementioned "You Got 
Served." F'or those of you 
who've been living under a 
rock. "You Got Served" is 
the story of two break 
dancers and their dance 
team whose goal in life is to 
beat "Wade's crew", a rival 
dance group from Orange 
County. In the end their 
dancing proves superior and 
the boys get to star in a Lil 
Kim video. I give this movie 
the highest rating of all 
time. Its only downfall was 
that Steve Harvey, and not 
Tony Uanza. played the part 
of Mr. Rad. Make sure you 
watch this movie 50 times 
before you even attempt a 
dance-off. 

"Ok Jason Bice. I watched 
the movie and it sucked! 



Now what?" 

You watch that damn 
movie again until you think 
it's the greatest movie 
you've ever seen! 

"Ok Jason Bice, that was 
the greatest movie 1 have 
ever seen in my life. Now 
what?" 

Now you wait for an 
opportunity to challenge 
.someone. An opportunity is 
basically when you take 
exception to what someone 
is doing. How's this for an 
example? Suppose you're in 
the "Sex in the City" fan 
club and you reserved the 
Gemmell MuIti-Purpose 
Room to watch season six. 
Unfortunately, when you 
get there, the geology club 
has already taken over and 
is having a mineral extrava- 
ganza. Oh well, looks lik( 
you'll all have to crowd into 
your little dorm room and 
w^atch season six. right? 
Hell no. You march in there 



and tell those geology nerds 
you're going to "rock" their 
socks off! (Get it "rock"? 
hahahaha... God. I'm lame.) 
Now it's on. From this 
point you can either go five 
on five or one on one. I usu- 
ally prefer one on one 
because I'm such a great 
dancer and don't want some 
slow-fo;)t tarnishing my 
I'ecord. 

Basically, there are three 
rounds and three unbiased 
judges. Round one is the 
pure moves round. The time 
limit is the length of the 
song that the judges pick. 
You and your opponent bet- 
ter be ready to showcase 
some, not all, of your best 
moves in this round. 

When the song ends the 
both of you face the judges. 
Each of them tells you what 
they liked and they didn't 
like and end with a vote of 
who wins the round. Don't 
worry if you lose this round, 
though. li' you're creative 
you can certainly make up 
for it in the second round. 

Round two is basically the 
same as round one but with 
one crucial difference - 
props! Not only are your 
moves reviewed but now 
you're judged on your choice 
of props and how you use 



them. So remember, if 
you're facing a geology kid 
and he pulls out a hand lens 
and his rock hammer, it's 
pretty much over unless you 
have something to combat 
it. When time is up in this 
round, you face the judges 
again and go through the 
same process as before. If 
after both rounds there is a 
tie. you must move on to 
round three. 

Now round three is where 
you show off the moves you 
didn't use in round one. Let 
me tell you about this round 
from my own experience. 

It was my first dance-off 
ever. What was worse was 
that one of the judges was 
one of the most famous 
dancers in Clarion. Dan 
Check. I also was at a disad- 
vantage being that I was 
facing a rather attractive 
girl and two of the judges 
were men. How was I to 
compete with that? 

As the music began for 
round one. I took a deep 
breath and started dancing 
all over the place. My choice 
moves are ridiculously quick 
feet and jazz hands. My 
opponent did the running 
man. It's plain to see who 
took the round! Jason Bice, 
that's who. 



Round two wasn't as suc- 
cessful. 1 tried using chop- 
sticks as my props but 
ended up poking myself in 
the eye. Meanwhile, my 
opponent just flaunted her 
large chest at the judges. 
Neetlless to say. we were fac- 
ing a tie and went on to 
round three. 

Round three is no cake- 
walk. You have to leave it all 
on the dance floor. We start- 
ed our respective moves and 
I could tell the judges were 
just not impressed. I knew I 
had to do something drastic. 
In between toe taps. I 
searched around the room. 
Then I had it. I quickly 
danced onto a chair and 
hopped from the chair on to 
the top of the meat freezer. 
The judges were astonished. 
Such a move had never been 
done. I tasted victory that 
day and it will remain with 
me the rest of my life. 

Anyway, the point of my 
story is that dance-offs are 
cool. They are so cool in fact 
that even lumberjacks and 
pirates partake of them. 
Therefore, if you want to be 
as cool as these men. gather 
up a crew and find someone 
to dance off against. Make 
sure to tell them. "You got 
Served!" 









I * 



> I' 






y 

i 
I 

■ 




THE CLARION CALL 



Page 5 



Presidential 
Commissions and 
STAR respond 

As part of the mission to 
foster a campus climate 
favorable to women, the 
Presidential Commission on 
the Status of Women, along 
with the other Presidential 
Commissions and STAR, 
would like to address the 
issue of recent Clarion Call 
editorial columns that pro- 
mote negative attitudes 
towards women. A recent 
article in The Call ii^ept. 15, 
2005, "Have fun at home on 
the weekends," by Jason 
Bice) suggests that a "fun" 
and "coor weekend for male 
students at Clarion 
University can be had by 
finding "some drunk girl" 
and having sex with her. "If 
she wakes up in the morn- 
ing and regrets it. let that 
be a lesson to her," the col- 
umn states. This can be 
interpreted as encouraging 
male students to commit 
the crime of date rape. 
Sexual relationships 

require consent. Seeking 
out someone who is drunk 
for the purpose of having 
sex with that person consti- 
tutes unethical, if not ille- 
gal, behavior. Female stu- 
dents cannot feel safe in an 
environment where they are 
seen as prey, with predators 
ready to take advantage of 
them whenever the occasion 
presents itself. 

In the Sept. 22 issue of 
The Clarion Call, Mr. Bice 
again expresses attitudes 
that are disrespectful to 
females. This column also 
reflects negative images of 
male students, giving the 



impression that our maU' 
studi'nts are only interested 
in (hiiiking and using 
female students. In fact, the 
first two respondents in The 
Call to Jason Bice's column 
of Sept. 15 were both male 
students who were greatly 
offended to be depicted the 
way they were in that col- 
umn. The attitudes 
expressed in thi'se columns 
cannot go imchailenged. 
Clarion fJniver.-iity strives 
to creati' an environment 
that fosters respect for all 
individuals. To advocate 
irresponsible or potentially 
criminal behavior violates 
the principles tor which 
Clarion Univt'rsity stands. 

It may he true that, for 
some young people, the col- 
lege years represent their 
first experience with inde- 
pendence. However, a stu- 
dent who is learning to live 
independently should be 
learning responsible and 
approjiriate adult l)ehav- 
lors. The behaviors suggest- 
ed in the cited articles are 
no joking matter and defi- 
nitely are not "cool." The 
ramifications of drunken 
behavior and date rape are 
not funny. Women may 
experience prolonged p.sy- 
chological distress, preg- 
nancy or sexually transmit- 
ted diseases. These ramifi- 
cations affect men as well. 
Learning res|)oiisible 

behaviors iii regard to 
drinking and sexual rela- 
tionships is an important 
part of matin-ing. 

The Clarion Call board 
and staff member.-^ should 
also realize that the atti- 
tudes expressed within the 
paper are transmitted to 
the entire campus, as well 
as off campus. A community 
member may take these 
"jokes" as a reflection of the 
kind of person they can 
expect to have m their com- 
munitv. Needless to sav. 



many community members 
will not view students posi- 
tively when they see such 
views. High school students 
deciding whether to attend 
Clarion University may 
read The Call and decidi' 
that if the university paper 
is willing to print such 
columns, this is not the 
plai'e for them. This column, 
and others like it. promote 
attitudes that will harm 
otheri. 

Clarion University admin- 
istration, faculty, staff and 
students are committed to 
making this campus an 
environment in which young 
people can learn the skills 
and behaviors necessary for 
responsible roles in our soci- 
ety, 

- The Presidential 
Commission on the Status 

of Women and its chairs, 

Melissa K. Downes and 

Laurie Occhipinti 

- The Presidential 
Commission on Affirmative 
Action and its chairs, Todd 

Lavin and Kaersten Colvin 
Woodruff 

- The Presidential 
Commission on Sexual 

Harassment and its chairs, 

Lisa Turner and Carl 

Callenburg 

- The Presidential 
Commission on Human 

Relations and its chairs, 

Mark Kilwein and Jocelynn 

Smrekar 

- The Presidential 
Commission on Disabilities 

and its chair, Shirley 
Johnson 

- STAR (Students Together 
Against Rape) and its presi- 
dent, Lisa Covington, and 
faculty advisors, Kathy 
Fleissner and Cindy 
Kennedy 





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HR 177 and Free 
Speech issues 

111 the Sept. S ecHtioti of 
The Clarion Call, it was 
reported that UK 177 was 
adopted over the summer, 
meaning that a spi'( lal eonr 
mittee will begin combing 
state-affiliated colleges and 
universities for evidi'iice ol' 
retiubution. both subtle and 
overt, directed against stu- 
dents and faculty members 
whose ideological views dif- 
fer from those that have tra- 
ditionally been associated 
with institutions of higher 
learning. Or. more truthful- 
ly, the committee will begin 
the arduous task of ferret- 
ing out all the liberalism 
that infects any given cam- 
pus to the detriment of 
those who wish to voice an 
opposing doctrine. .Ml this 
is to play out under the 
guise of protecting free 
speech. 

The standard-bearer for 
HR 177. Oibson xArmstong 
(K, Lancaster County), 
pointed out that the resolu- 
tion was a bi-partisan ani- 
mal, but he failed to qualify 
that assertion with the 
numbers-of the nearly four- 
dozen sponsors, only a 
liandful were democrats. 
This degree of commitment 
more closely resembles trep- 
idation than it does zeal, as 
well it should. 

College campuses have 
long been held to be bas- 
tions of free exchange, and 
not without reason. 



Certainly the ti-rm "iibi'ral- 
ism" implies as much, just 
as "conservatism" implies 
ccinstraint. So in order to 
stamp out the liberal mes- 
sage that so offends 
Armstrong, he must undi r- 
inine the mechanism thai he 
claims to embrace. No way 
(•!' thinking is more erro- 
neous, except for the notion 
that handcuffing professors 
and feeding the fire of 
hype"-sensitivity will ulti- 
mately make the education- 
al process more fruitful. 

Armstrong claims an ally 
in his fight the Foundation 
for Individual Rights in 
Higher Education (FIRK). 
He didn't bother to let this 
alliance simply remain dubi- 
ous, but instead went out of 
his way to make assurances 
that FIRE could not be 
assailed as "being some 
right-wing nut group." 
whii'h immediately drew m>- 
suspicion. 

Fortunately. when I 
browsed through FlRK's 
website (www.thefire.org). I 
was able to get a sense of the 
outfit's non-partisan 

approach that Armstrong 
lauded: "Illiberal university 
policies and practices must 
be exposed to public criti- 
cism and scrutiny so that 
the public is made aware of 
the violations of basic rights 
that occur every day on col- 
lege campuses." Slyly using 
the term "illiberal" kind of 
says it all. 

- Henry Guthrie, 
student 



"Corpse Bride" movie 
not worth five leaves 

I have a bone to pick with 
movie reviewer Nathan 
Stahlman. How can you 
give "Corpse Bride" five 
leaves? 

1 just went to see this 
movie last Friday, and 
although I walked out of the 
movie saying. "It was a good 
movie," it definitely was not 
worth five leaves, unless it's 
out of 10. There were a lot of 
(li.screpancu's in the movie. 

The major discrepency was 
that when Victor was prac- 
ticing his vows in the forest 
and put the ring on Kmily's 
linger, she came out of the 
ground and nearly chased 
him around town. However, 
when they both wanted to 
come back to the living 
world to meet his parents, 
she had to go to that old 
man to do so. Furthermore, 
when they did get up there 
she was like, "It's been so 
long since I've seen the 
moonlight." Please! She was 
just up there chasing him. 

OK, maybe this isn't a dis- 
crepancy, but the movie just 
ended and I wanted to know 
more. I hope Tim Burton 
doesn't believe this story 
needs a sequel. I hope that 
Mr. Stahlman would pay 
more attention to the movie 
instead of what's going on 
around him. Yeah. I read 
your other article as well. 

-LaAja Wiggins, 
student 



LEGAL NOTICE 



It you rented U-Haul moving equipment from a U-Haul center or independent dealer 

in the state of Pennsylvania after August 7. 1992 and were charged for a second 

rental term despite returning the equipment within 24 hours, then you are 

a member of a Class Action Lawsuit against U-Haui International, Inc. 

and its subsidiary U-Hau! Company of Pennsylvania, Inc. 

You are not being sued, The class is suing U-Haul for a refund of any improper 

charges. There has not /e( been any determination of the merits of the lawsuit 

The defendants deny any liability. You will be bound by the result of this 

lawsuit unless you exclude yourself from the Class. 

if you exclude yourself you will not be entitled to share in any recovery but 

you will still have tfie right to file your own lawsuit, 

If you do not wish to be a member of the Class, you must say that you do not want to be a 

member of the class by letter or post card (postmarked on or before December 15, 2005) 

sent to U-Haul Litigation, RO. Box 2081. Philadelphia. PA 19103. You must sign the 

correspondence and print your name, address and telephone number. 

If you do nothing, you will continue to be a member of the Class and your 
rights will be determined by the result of the case. 

You can obtain additional information about this lawsuit and your rights by calling 

1-877-745-4148 or by visiting www.UHAULPennsylvaniaLitiQation.com . 

You can also call or e-maii any one of plaintiffs' three attorneys; 

Michael Gehring - 215-814-6750 - mgehring(g)bolognese-law.com 

Richard D, Greenfield - 410-745-4149 - whifehatrdg@earthlink.net 

Ann Caldwell - 21 5-248-2030 - acaldwell@classactlaw,com 

Reference: Boyle, et al. v. U-Haul International, Ltd.. et al., August Term 
1998. No. 0840 (Court of Common Pleas. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania) 






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"Getting 


'crazv' with mv friends fr 


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hero 






and back home." 








Sara Hoover 
and Jenna An^elos 

"What is your favorite 

thing about A.L.F., 

besides the 

Poor Man's 

caramel apples?" 




Carlos Bi kns 

FurSllMAN, PSN ( IK )l <)<i> 

"The funnel cakes." 





Vankssa Bi nk<>\ i< 


II 


Fri 


SIIMAN, Bl SINl 


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ANC IMi 


"Watching the floats 


at the 


parade." 







Brian Pi 


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NitiK. Sim 1 I 11 C 


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"The 


overabundance o 


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women. 




I really love 


women." 






Anna CjOI.dman 

Si Niou, SicoNDAKN Fi)i c viioN Mahi 

'Walking around with wing sauce 
all over mv face!" 



A J <Jrav|.:s 

Fri SHMA\, Hi siNKss M.AN.xtif mint 

"The Louisiana chicken" 




Pages 



Tm CLARION CALL 



October 6. 2005 



Feitms 



'From Ritual to Reality' 

Callais gives anti-hazlng lecture at Clarion University 



Amber White 

Assistant Features Editor 

A presentation on "anti" 
hazing" would probably 
make most people think of a 
long, tedious lecture on the 
importance of risk manage- 
ment. This is exactly the 
reason why Dr. Mari Ann 
Callais, Theta Phi Alpha 
National President, was 
asked to present her pro- 
gram "From Ritual to 
Reality" on Sept. 29. This 
presentation was one of the 
events held during National 
Hazing Prevention Week 
and sponsored by 

Interfraternity and 

Panhellenic Councils. 

Though the program was 
open to everyone, many of 
the general populace were 
unsure what it had to do 
with preventing hazing. 
Callais opened with a brief 
introduction of herself fol- 
lowed by picking several vol- 
unteers to sing "Lean On 
Me." The audience was 
encouraged to sing along, 
and when most people kept 
quiet, Callais teased them 
about wearing their "cool 
caps." By the end of the first 



song, most of the fraternity 
and sorority members were 
singing along and continued 
to sing along to the follow- 
ing two songs. 

The purpose of opening 
with these songs, Callais 
later explained, was to show 
that during those few min- 
utes, everyone allowed 
themselves "to see brother- 
hood and sisterhood." The 
program had very little 
mention of hazing or risk 
management at all, which is 
what proved so confusing to 
those not in a Greek organi- 
zation. Another activity 
involved eight members of 
different Greek organiza- 
tions, each holding a part of 
a large blanket that repre- 
sented the Greek communi- 
ty on campus. Callais then 
proceeded to ask several 
questions such as whether 
any of them had ever missed 
a chapter event, spoken neg- 
atively about people in their 
organizations or another 
group on campus, or partici- 
pated in underage drinking. 
Whenever someone had 
done one of those things, he 
or she had to remove one 
hand from the blanket. It 
didn't drop to the floor, 



which was what Callais said 
usually happened, but it 
still made her point: mem- 
bers of Greek organizations 
frequently contradict what 
they say they stand for. 

The point of her program 
was to remind these organi- 
zations of their Ritual, the 
ceremony usually performed 
at the time of initiation. The 
Ritual, Callais explained, 
was created by the founders 
of each sorority and frater- 
nity as an example of what 
they wanted their organiza- 
tion to be. 

"Do you think they were 
out there doing the Walk of 
Shame?" she asked, refer- 
ring to an infamous act of 
hazing. "If your founders 
were alive today, would they 
be proud of who you are?" 

When asked why they had 
joined a sorority or fraterni- 
ty, one male immediately 
shouted "To meet girls!" 
which made the audience 
laugh. Other people said 
they wanted an opportunity 
for leadership roles. Callais 
asked if the right people 
were joining their organiza- 
tions. When the founders 
created these groups, they 
only allowed people who fit 




Melissa Holller/The Clarion Call 
ANTI-HAZING - Dr. Mari Ann Callais, along with some of Clarion University's Greeks, sang "Lean on 
Me" as part of her antl-hazing lecture. 



their ideals; was that still 
the case, with the organiza- 
tions of today? 

"Our actions speak a lot 
louder than anything we 
can be or do," she said. 

The actions of these soror- 
ities and fraternities and 
Greek organizations on all 
different campuses often 
give the public a completely 
different idea of what 
they're about. Callais point- 
ed out that they're all "in a 



relationship with their 
organization," and as such 
need to really think about 
the impression that they're 
making on people. "You've 
joined something that's 
much bigger than you." 

In the end, her main point 
was that Greek organiza- 
tions should go back and 
take a look at their Ritual. 
"Living the Ritual" meant 
being who they say they are. 
The implied message was 



that by following the Ritual, 
and truly believing in the 
words that their founders 
wrote 80 long ago, hazing 
would no longer be an issue 
because the atmosphere in 
each organization would be 
a more positive one. 

"If you don't really live 
what you say you are," 
Callais said, "you'll say 'I 
was a member of...' If you 
read the ritual, you say 'I 
am. 




Cultural Night 



Spirit On The Hill per- 
fomed Tuesday night in 
front of the court house 
as part of the 11th 
Annual Clarion University 
and Community Cultural 
Night This performance 
was just one of many 
that took place from Oct. 
3 to Oct. 7. 



Melissa Holller/TTie Clarion Call 



U-ASC gives academic advice 



Kevin Wetter 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

"The answers to schedul- 
ing aren't hiding in that lit- 
tle space they call a freezer." 
That slogan comes from 
a service that helps guide 
unsure students in the right 
direction. And since college 
is a time when a person 
must figure out what career 
is right for them, it would 
seem then that there would 
be a line out the door to such 
a service. The truth is the 
majority of students don't 
even know this place exists. 
The Advising Services 
Center (U-ASC) acts as a 
place where undecided stu- 
dents and anyone else can 
go get academic advice. 

U-ASC was created seven 
years ago. It was originally 
created to help undecided 
and liberal studies students. 



Coordinator Trudi Tedjeske 
said, "The Advising Services 
Center is for liberal studies 
students and undecided stu- 
dents; these students don't 
have a typical department 
to go to." 

U-ASC isn't just limited to 
liberal studies and undecid- 
ed majors though; it is avail- 
able to every student on 
campus. 

"The Advising Services 
Center also acts as a drop in 
center. Anyone can drop- in 
and get academic advising," 
Tedjeske said. 

The center works in con- 
junction with counseling 
and career services. They 
coordinate and distribute 
the ACES binder. ACES 
stands for Academic Career 
Essentials Success. 

Tedjeske said, "Every 
incoming freshman receives 
this blue three-ring binder. 
It has information on finan- 



cial aid, registration, with- 
drawing from a class and 
also things like career infor- 
mation and how to build a 
resume and portfolio so a 
student can use it their sen- 
ior year." 

Last week U-ASC promot- 
ed "Meet Your Advisor 
Week." This week encour- 
ages freshmen to go in and 
meet with their advisor. 

"We work with other 
departments to promote 
advisees to meet their advi- 
sor," said Tedjeske. 

This event allows students 
to get to know their advisor, 
and the advisors can tell 
students what classes they 
need to take next semester 
and also guide them in their 
academic careers. 

"The most difficult part 
is that students don't know 
we are here," Tedjeske said. 



Jeff Donston 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 



One walks by them every- 
day. Oh, they might 
acknowledge them with a 
head nod or a simple smile 
or maybe even a hello, but 
that's all. These people are 
a part of each others lives 
for a split second. These 
people are strangers. 
Students will spend four or 
more years here at Clarion, 
but we won't get to know 
most of our fellow students 
that we see everyday. Well 
what if you stopped and 
talked to one of those 
strangers that you pass 
everyday on your way to 
class. What if you found out 
that same person you see 
everyday on your way to 
Gemmell is actually a pret- 
ty amazing person. 

Ali Davis is a 20 year old 
junior special education 
major. She grew up with 
one younger sister in the 
town of Latrobe, Pa. and 
graduated from Greater 
Latrobe High School. 

Davis's hometown of 
Latrobe is the hometown of 
Mr. Rogers of "Mr. Rogers 
Neighborhood" and golf leg- 



end Arnold Palmer. Latrobe 
is also the home of the 
Rolling Rock brewery and 
home of the Pittsburgh 
Steelers training camp at 
Saint Vincent college. 

As a child, Davis was in 
the band for eight years and 
in the marching band for 
two years in high school. 
She was involved in the 
youth ministry at her 
church and was also 
involved in the girl scouts 
when she was younger. As a 
girl scout, she received the 
"Gold Award," which is the 
highest recognition that a 
girl scout can receive. 

Davis chose to come to 
Clarion Univer&ity after 
visiting Clarion in high 
school while trying to 
decide what college to go to. 
She chose Clarion because 
she liked the people she met 
during her visit. Davis said 
she loves the people at 
Clarion. 

"I love that I can walk 
down the street and talk to 
anybody," she said. 

As a freshman, Davis was 
a student worker with 
Clarion University's human 
resources and helped plan 
and run the 2004 Wellness 
Fair. The Wellness Fair was 



J 



an event that explored the 
seven aspects of wellness, 
which include physical, 
social, emotional, intellec- 
tual, occupational, spiritual 
and environmental well- 
ness. 

Davis is a former Resident 
Assistant of the fifth floor in 
Wilkinson Hall. She said 
the best part of being an RA 
was "getting to know peo- 
ple." Davis loves to lead 
people and that is why she 
is a part of the Transitions 
program and has been an 
orientation leader for the 
last two years. The 
Transitions program helps 
incoming freshmen adapt to 
college life through orienta- 
tion during the summer, 
discovery, which is two days 
of intensive programming 
for incoming freshman and 
exploration, which are co- 
curricular programs and 
activities beginning fresh- 
man year and extending 
into alumni years. 

Davis is also the secretary 
for the Newman 

Association. The Newman 
Association is an officially 
recognized student Catholic 
organization that holds 
educational, spiritual and 
business meetings and cam- 



Campus Ctoie«u 





Shasta Kurtz, Kristen Staley, Devon Yorkshire The Clarion Call 



pus mass every Sunday. 

Also in her spare time, 
Davis volunteers for the Arc 
of Clarion county, helping 
with the Special Olympics. 
She also volunteers and 
helps out on Saturday 
Service Day, a community 
service program. 

When Davis is not volun- 
teering her time or involved 
in other activities, she 
enjoys hanging out with her 
friends and roommates. 



Davis loves to read Nora 
Roberts' romance novels 
and hkes country music, 
especially Toby Keith. She 
enjoys going to concerts and 
likes to collect movies. She 
is excited about the upcom- 
ing Autumn Leaf Festival. 
It is her, "favorite, favorite 
week," she said. Davis has 
been dating her boyfriend, 
who is a student at 
Pittsburgh Technical 

Institute, for four and a half 



years. She lives in Reinhard 
Villages and has three fish 
for pets, one of which she 
has had since her freshman 
year. 

After college, Davis plans 
on teaching and getting her 
masters degree. She would 
like to get married and have 
"lots" of kids. She eventual- 
ly would like to get her doc- 
torate and be a college 
professor. 



October 6, 2005 



THE CLARION CALL 



Page? 



f 



y* 



I 






Phi Delta Theta's fashion fundraiser 



Jeff Donston 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Fraternities and sororities 
joined together for a com- 
mon cause ... add pulsating 
music and the latest fash- 
ions. This equals just one of 
the fundraisers put together 
as part of Operation Clarion 
Cares to raise money for vic- 
tims of Hurricane Katrina. 
On Wednesday, Sept. 28 in 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
Room, Phi Delta Theta fra- 
ternity and Crooks Clothing 
held a fall fashion showcase. 

The night started off with 
the hosts of the fashion 
show, Candice Pipino and 
Adam Whitaker, explaining 
the motivation behind the 
fashion show. The total in 
donations taken at the door 
would be matched by Jim 
Crooks of Crooks Clothing 
up to $1,000 and put 
towards Operation Clarion 
Cares, whose goal is to raise 
$10,000 for Hurricane 
Katrina victims. 

The idea of holding a fash- 
ion show to benefit Katrina 
came from the brothers of 
Phi Delta Theta. 

Jessica Bayer, special 
events chair for the 
University Activities Board, 
said, "It was all Phi Delta 
Theta. The Phi Delts con- 
tacted the UAB and got the 
paperwork going." 



Cody Ressel, vice presi- 
dent of student senate, said 
that the fashion show was, 
"a great way to help the 
fundraising effort for 
Hurricane Katrina." 

The models were members 
of Delta Zeta. Delta Phi 
Epsilon, Alpha Sigma Tau 
and Zeta Tau Alpha sorori- 
ties and Phi Delta Theta 



fraternity. They wore fall 
clothing from lines such as 
Polo, Calvin Klein, Tommy 
Hilfiger, Mauve and Buffalo, 
which were donated by 
Crooks Clothing for the 
show. They strutted the run- 
way two at a time for a half 
hour to an assortment of hip 
hop, techno and rock music 
and a cheering crowd. 



Derek Parker, a member of 
Phi Delta Theta and an 
employee of Crooks clothing, 
helped model clothes at the 
show. Parker said he volun- 
teered because this is a good 
way to help Katrina victims 
and to help out his "Phi 
Delt" brothers. 

"Even though I am a grad 
student, I am willing to help 




Photo courtesy of John Thompson 
FUNDRAISER FOR KATRINA VICTIMS - At the conclusion of the fashion show, the brothers of Phi 
Delta Theta made Jim Crooks, owner of Crooks Clothing, an honorary brother and presented him 
with their letters. The fashion show raised $1,807.20 for the victims of Hurricane Katrina. 



Phi Delts any time," Parker 
said. 

The show ended with the 
models all coming out one 
last time and dancing on the 
runway. While the dona- 
tions were being counted, 
the audience was treated to 
a rendition of the song 
"There Are Worse Things I 
Could Do" from the movie 
soundtrack "Grease," sung 
by model Sara Hoover. 

Terria Dotson, a spectator 
of the show said, "I went to 
the show to help raise 
money for Katrina and also 
to support the brothers of 
Phi Delta Theta because I 
know they worked hard to 
organize the show. I think 
everyone did a really good 
job modeling the clothes and 
Sara Hoover did a great job 
singing at the end." 

After Hoover's perform- 
ance, hosts Pipino and 
Witaker came back out and 
thanked all parties that 
were involved with the 
show. When the night was 
said and done, the show 
raised $903.60 in donations. 
After Crooks matched the 
amount, the grand total was 
$1,807.20. After the amount 
in donations was 

announced, the brothers of 
Phi Delta Theta came back 
out and made Jim Crooks an 
honorary brother and pre- 
sented him with their 
letters. 



Academic Enrichment program serves over 400 students 



Kurt Boyd 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

So, how many students 
understand everything that 
professors teach in class? 
The transition from high 
school to college can be one 
that confuses many stu- 
dents at Clarion University. 
That is why Clarion has a 



Center for Academic 
Enrichment located in 
Ralston Hall. 

First estabhshed in Egbert 
Hall in 1971, the Academic 
Enrichment program has 
helped countless students 
reach their full potential at 
the collegiate level. 

"We started out with only 
four faculty members; now 
we have 20," said Dr. Lou 



## 



Family Health 
Council, Inc. 



1064A. East Main Street 

814-226-7500 
www. fhcinc.org 



Providing birth controL emergeric> 

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Free STl) festinti c^ treatment. 



Mosi insiii aiuf piaiis accepted. 

Sli(lin<» scale tVcs lor Ihusc without insiiraiicc 

All .sc!\iccs arc conlitlciUial. 



Tripodi, director of the 
Center for Academic 
Enrichment. In its first 
semester on campus, the 
enrichment program had a 
total of 10 tutors, and today 
they have 26 helping over 
400 students with their col- 
lege courses. 

There are two components 
that go into the Center for 
Academic Enrichment, the 
learning skills lab and the 
tutorial center. The learn- 
ing skills lab gives students 
an opportunity to under- 
stand the basic principles, 
ideas and processes needed 
to become an independent 
thinker. This is done by 
individual instruction, com- 
puter-assisted instruction, 
small group instruction, 
classroom lectures, study 
groups and the use of their 
study room. The tutorial 
center is an aid to the 
instructions students 



receive in their classrooms. 
If a student is having diffi- 
culty grasping a certain part 
of a course, a one-on-one or 
small group instruction ses- 
sion will take place to help 
the student better under- 
stand the material. Help is 
offered in most lower-divi- 
sion subjects and some 
select upper-division sub- 
jects. Two classes given at 
the Enrichment Center are 
AE 100 and AE 260. The 
purpose of these classes are 
to teach students how to 
take college level classes, 
while also giving them a 
taste of classroom life. 

Some of the other pro- 
grams that are available are 
not just for Clarion 
University students, but 
also for students in sur- 
rounding counties. The 
, Upward Bound program 
deals with students from 
eight local school districts in 



grades nine to 12 to help 
them prepare for the next 
step of their higher educa- 
tion. It currently has around 
80 students that take part. 

Another program is the 
Talent Search Program, 
which looks for people mid- 
dle school aged all the way 
10 adults with the willing- 
ness and potential of success 
at the collegiate level. 
There are approximately 
950 people currently 
involved with this program. 
It affects the counties of 
Jefferson, Clarion and 
Venango. 

The majority of students 
who take advantage of the 
programs offered at the 
Center for Academic 
Enrichment are freshmen 
and sophomores, but it is 
open to any student on cam- 
pus seeking aid for their 
studies. 



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ASK. 



Dear Dr Kagle, 

A,s everyone knows 
Autumn Leaf Festival is 
coming up, and it is a big 
deal in Clarion. The 
weekend of homecoming 
there are a lot of parties 
going on, but I am not 
interested in drinking. 
My friends are all going 
out and they want me to 
come. How can I go out 
with them and have fun 
while thev are all drink- 



ing/ 



Signed, 
Drinkless 



Dear Drinkless, 

You can still go out and 
enjoy A.L.F. with your 
friends without the party- 
ing. During the entire 
week there are carnival 
rides, great food and dif- 
ferent events every day, 
Ask your friends to go 
down there with you one 
night and have some fun. 
You can remind them 
that A.L.F. is not just 
about partying. You 
should all be able to find 
something that can inter- 
est you and your friends. 
If your friends insist 
that you go with them to 
a party tell them you will 
be the designated driver. 
This will allow you to go 
out and have a good time, 
but you will also have an 
excuse as to why you are 
not drinking. Here are 
some facts that you can 
share with your friends 
about students drinking 
in Clarion. 

■ Over % of students 
drink four drinks or less 
per week 

■ 77 percent of the stu- 
dents drink 1/5 of all the 
alcohol consumed 

■ Over % of the students 
drink 1/5 of the alcohol 
consumed. 

■ 40 percent of students 
do not drink at all 

If you and your friends 
go out during A.L.F., 
make sure you stay safe. 
Make sure you go out 
with a group of people 
and you leave with the 
people you went with. Be 
careful walking late at 
night and try to walk on 
well-lit streets. 

Overall, try and make 
smart decisions when it 
comes to A.L.F. 
Remember that there are 
plenty of other activities 
that you can do during 
the week that do not 
involve partying and still 
allow you to have fun. 
* Information was gath- 
ered from the CORE 
Survey conducted in 
March 2005* 

Doctor Eagle is written 
by Sarah Wilson of the 
Keeling Health Center. 
For more information or 
to suggest a topic, please 
contact her at s_smwil- 
8on@clarion,edu. 




i*^ 



^■^a 



Page 8 



Tm CLARION CALL 



October 6. 2005 



tiUrtiinnt 

KMA presents self love safety, techniques 



Jeannette Good 

Copy and Design Editor 

CLARION, Oct. 2 - Keeping 
Minds Aware (KMA) pre- 
sented "The Art of Self Love" 
on Oct. 2 at 9 p.m. in 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
Room. 

About 75 people showed up 
for this seminar on mastur- 
bation. 

Samm Krigbaum, presi- 
dent and co-founder, said, 
"It was demanded by the 
people." She explained that 
this presentation is often 
requested. "It's our kickoff 
event for our organization," 



she said. KMA offers educa- 
tional programs geared to 
college students and takes 
requests from students. 

The presentation started 
with a video about the histo- 
ry of masturbation and then 
moved on to an icebreaker. 
Krigbaum split the room in 
half and had everyone play 
"the penis game." She then 
had each group shout either 
penis or vagina to decide 
which presentation would 
go first. Penis won. 

Kavetski presented male 
masturbation, explaining 
the parts of the genitalia 
and technique. Dustin 
Weber, sophomore second- 
ary education social studies 



major, volunteered to help 
demonstrate. 
The parts and technique of 



(( 



It was demanded by 
the people. 

- Samm Krigbaum, 
president of KMA 



» 



the vagina and female mas- 
turbation were presented. 

Krigbaum reviewed and 
stressed safety for all forms 



of masturbation. 

Krigbaum then went over 
mental masturbation, and 
she said, "Just get into it." 
Use sounds and visual aids 
to help yourself get into it. 
They showed a video of two 
chairs having fun. 

They squashed common 
myths and then explained 
four ways of mutual mastur- 
bation^ non-mutual, one- 
way mutual, standard 
mutual, topAjottom mutual. 
No one asked questions, 
but the presenters did ask 
for them. The evening ended 
with a recruitment video for 
KMA. 




Jeannette Good/The Clarion Call 

DEMONSTRATION - Dustin Weber helps Kelly Kavetski demon- 
strate male masturbation techniques at KMA's presentation 
'The Art of Self Love.' 



Nezhukumatathll kicks off Spoken Art series 



Steve Trichtinger 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Sept. 29 - The 
English Department, along- 
side A.S.I.A. (Asian Student 
Integrated Association), pre- 
sented poet Aimee 
Nezhukumatathll to a 
packed house in the 



University Art Gallery in 
the Carlson Library. The 
gallery set the atmosphere. 
Many of those in attendance 
were discussing the room, 
the craft of writing, if they 
left the oven on and most 
importantly the focus of the 
night, Aimee 

Nezukumatathil. 

The crowd sat waiting to 




Photo courtesy of A.S.I.A. 

SPOKEN WORD ART - Aimee Nezhukumatathll reads poetry for 
audience in the University Gallery 



hear selected poems from 
Nezhukumatathil's award- 
winning book "Miracle 
Fruit." 

She is a half-Indian, half- 
Asian poet from Chicago. 
Her first writing experience 
was in second grade. 

"In second grade, I won the 
Haiku poetry contest. I 
thought it was magical to be 
creative," she said. Although 
originally going to Ohio 
University for chemistry, 
she took what she thought 
would be a blow-off class, 
creative writing. "It was the 
hardest thing I ever tried to 
do, but I loved being chal- 
lenged to make the ordinary, 
extraordinary," she said. 

Laughs and smiles 
emerged from the audience 
in between the silent focus 
and infatuation with 
Nezhukumatathil's poems. 
Her blend of humor, roman- 



ticism, and general observa- 
tion and description of the 
mundane captures the sim- 
plicity and grace of everyday 



« 



/ attempt to show- 
case and celebrate 
the magic of the 
natural world and 
family relations. 
- Aimee Nezhukumatathil 



n 



life. "I attempt to showcase 
and celebrate the magic of 
the natural world and fami- 
ly relations, " she said. With 
poems such as "Swear 
Words," "Fishbone" and 
"What I Learned from the 
Incredible Hulk," Aimee 



uses her life and personal 
experiences as a basis for 
many of her poems. Taking 
a look at her numerous 
awards, it works. 

After her performance, 
students and faculty both 
lined up waiting for her to 
sign books and give her 
input about her life. "One of 
my favorite parts of doing 
this is getting to meet the 
people who read the work," 
she said. 

The students responded 
with great joy for her efforts 
and time. "I like her a lot, 
she has an innovative way 
of describing things. The 
way she says things is not 
cliche', it's very refreshing," 
said Julia Perry, senior 
English and Spanish major. 
One of the students 
responsible for the presenta- 
tion was Huyen Vo, presi- 
dent of A.S.I.A. "A.S.I.A was 



only started two years ago, 
and we have wanted to work 
with the English 

Department with bringing 
in an Asian related speaker. 
Dr. Terman introduced me 
to Aimee and the Spoken Art 
Reading Series, and I 
thought this would be a 
great opportunity to get 
involved," Vo said. In the 
tenth year of the Spoken Art 
Reading Series, Director of 
the Committee for visiting 
writers, Dr. Phil Terman 
said, "It is a great opportu- 
nity for students to get expo- 
sure to creative writing." 
Nezhukumatathil agrees, 
and she had some advice for 
young writers, "Find your 
own rhythm, stay true to 
yourself and write about it 
in a way that no one else 
has." 



Michelle's Cafe hosts free acoustic show 



Jon Gofer 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Sept. 29 - 
Michelle's Cafe on Main 
Street held an acoustic 
show, which started at 6 
p.m. and lasted until nearly 
9 p.m. Students packed into 
the cafe from the couches 
and chairs in the front, to 
the tables in the middle, and 
some even stood in the back. 
Many took advantage of the 
location to buy themselves 
coffee or other treats. 

rightAFTERnow started 
off the evening, followed by 
John Airhart of The Calm 
Before, who played a couple 
of solo songs. Freshman 
Mitch Weller, business man- 



agement major, said that 
rightAFTERnow sounded 
really good for playing 
acoustic and with only two 
members. This was true for 
the whole evening, as most 
of the groups who played 
had to have several of their 
members sit the night out 
because it was acoustic. 
Weller also said, "John 
Airhart was more mellow 
than usual singing by him- 
self, but he's my hero and 
always sounds good." 

"I don't do it [play solo] 
often," Airhart said, "So it's 
a rare event for the kids who 
made it to tonight's show." 

Second To Next played 
third, followed by 

Practically Single. 

Practically Single finished 
their set by playing an 



altered version of 

Semisonic's "Closing Time" 
by adding pieces of songs 
like Third Eye Blind's 
"Semi-Charmed Life," 



(( 



It was just a good 
time and a night of 
good music. 



- Jon Bolden 



Matchbox 20's "Push," and 
"Genie in a Bottle" by 
Christina Aguilera. Lead 
singer Bill Janes invited 
everyone in the audience to 
sing along, and they 



received a considerable 
response from the crowd. 

Janes, sophomore psychol- 
ogy major and lead singer of 
Practically Single said he 
was very impressed with the 
crowd. "We've played 
acoustic before, but this just 
turned out well. We're 
extremely happy that a lot 
of kids came out." When 
asked how playing acoustic 
is much different than with 
the full band Janes said, 
"It's more of a solo when 
playing acoustic. Everyone's 
listening closer to your voice 
and the pitch - it's a more 
intimate atmosphere." 

Jon Bolden, a comedy-ori- 
ented performer from 
Columbus, OH played next. 
He sat up in the front and 
played his songs by himself 



- narrating and telling jokes 
between songs. "I'm on tour 
and was passing through, 
and e-mailed them [The 
Calm Before] and they 
immediately hooked me up 
for the show!" Bolden later 
said. Bolden warmed up 
with a short cover of "Feel 
Good Inc." by the Gorillaz, 
then moved onto original 
songs. 

"The crowd was great, very 
interactive and friendly. It 
was just a good time and a 
night of good music," Bolden 
said. 

The Calm Before closed 
out the evening. While the 
band set up their equip- 
ment, guitarist Joel Masters 
warmed up by playing a 
cover of The Pixies "Where 
Is My Mind," commonly 



recalled as the song during 
the end credits of the movie 
"Fight Club." 

The Calm Before, as usual, 
put on a good performance. 
They joked around between 
songs, and the audience was 
involved and singing 
throughout almost their 
whole set. Airhart actually 
ended up dedicating a song 
to Mitch Weller called "Beer 
and Tunnel," which the 
crowd responded to with 
applause and laughter. 

The Calm Before had to 
cut their show a song short 
due to time. However, every- 
one left Michelle's Cafe 
laughing and chatting, and 
it cleared out fairly quickly 
and finally went quiet. 



Do you need some help using the library? Come to one of Carlson 
Library's open sessions. These sessions are open to ail students and are 
offered on a first-come first-sen/ed basis. Reservations will not be accept- 
ed. These classes are taught in the Level 2 Instruction Lab In Carlson 
Library (Room # 201). For schedules and descriptions of these sessions, 
visit www.clarion.edu/library/teachingschedule.shtml. Sign-in sheets will 
be collected for each session. We hope to see you soon! 



rbUYMBieliiACMDlNICHlEf 



I 
I 
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■ 



Present tt^is coiipori vvt-ien 
you huy a K19 Miic aafitJ- 
vvicfi arid recei-. e a ser.ond 
one ftep Lirn t one incx.1 
ilern pe^ coupon p«ri 
ci.iStoiti»TT pel viii.it P!«rase- 
present coupon v^hen 
OKioiing fJot Vctiici wrt^■^ i>ny 
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Valid in 
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and PunxsutawneyJ 




Audrey FIske/The Clarion Call 
ART EXHIBITION- Artwork from professor Jim Rose hangs on exhibit at Michelle's Cafe. 
Rose's exhibit ran from Sept. 5 through Oct. 7. 



■' 



October 6. 2005 



THE CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



'Coheed and Cambria: sci-fi nerds? 




Kim Cammuso 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Coheed and Cambria 

"Good Apollo" 

rating :4/5 ^^||^^ 

Coheed and Cambria 
released their third full- 
length album "Good Apollo, 
I'm Burning Star IV. Volume 
i: From Fear Through The 
Eyes of Madness" on Sept. 
20. 

It is rather difficult to even 
begin with an album that 
presents a title like "Good 
Apollo, I'm Burning Star IV, 
Volume I: From Fear 
Through the Eyes of 
Madness." Within this one, 
15- word heading there are 
mythical characters, made 
up locations and roman 
numerals. That's a lot to 
consume without having 
any prior knowledge of 
where this outwardly pes- 
simistic band is coming 
from. Yes, Coheed and 
Cambria's music is rather 
unusual, the vocals are 
bizarre, their concept is odd, 



and lead singer Claudio 
Sanchez sports an afro. But 
behind all this mystery and 
chaotic facade, there is a 
band with goals, aspirations 
and ideas that are very real, 
and very important. Some 
would call them pioneers in 
the world of rock and roll, 
others would call them 
redeemers of the classic rock 
sound, and, still, some 
would consider them to be 
developed emo, sci-fi nerds. 

Not everyone has the taste 
or patience for such a group, 
which promotes these over- 
lyexaggerated song titles 
and drawn-out lyrics. But it 
would be so hard to deny the 
fact that Coheed and 
Cambria are bound to make 
some kind of inspirational 
and ultimately brilliant 
mark on the world of rock 
music that we know today. 

"Good Apollo" is the band's 
most recent benchmark 
along this thrilling musical 
excursion, and will corre- 
spond with the release of an 
explicit novel that will tell 
its story. Among those who 
have already heard the 



record, of course opinions 
and reactions vary, and 
many comparisons are being 
made to Coheed and 
Cambria's remarkable 

freshman and sophomore 
albums, "The Second Stage 
Turbine Blade" and "In 
Keeping Secrets of Silent 
Earth: 3," respectively. 

The band's third record 
begins with what is now rec- 
ognized as the alluring and 
theatrical theme song for 
their Bag Online 

Adventures of Coheed and 
Cambria series, under 
which title, each chapter of 
their story falls/rises. The 
abundantly composed intro 
serves to sweep you away 
and delay your beliefs for 
the length of the album. The 
first song on the record 
"Always and Never," is love- 
ly and touching, but has no 
place whatsoever following 
"Keeping the Blade." The 
following track on the 
album, "Welcome Home," is 
a stand-alone spectacular 
rush of rock and roll 
rhythms to be sure to get 
your adrenaline flowing. 



"Ten Speed (Of God's Blood 
and Burial)," is another 
focal point, with Sanchez 
singing in the menacing way 
that only he can. The sooth- 
ing bridge is sung beautiful- 
ly, but my one complaint is 
that the dialogue found here 
is very unclear and some- 
what frustrating as well. 

Coheed and Cambria 
make their tracks flourish 
with two main techniques, 
amazing guitar skills that 
work to boost the verses and 
make them flow and bridges 
that come off to be very 
uplifting. The lyrics, and 
acoustic rhythms displayed 
in the songs "Crossing the 
Frame." "Once Upon Your 
Dead Body" and "Mother 
May 1" all add a change of 
pace in the mood of the 
music to keep it interesting 
and inspiring. "Good 

Apollo, I'm Burning Star IV. 
Volume I- From Fear 
through the Eyes of 
Madness" will indeed take 
you on a journey; either an 
enjoyable one or one you'd 
rather forget. 



'Bewitched' movie 

The Fierce Auditorium was dark, and there were 12 
students in attendance. Not a very large crowd, but the 
laughter made up for the lack of students. "Bewitched" 
was playing on the screen ahead, thanks to your 
friends at UAB. The movie Rhowcaaed stars such as 
Will Ferrell and Nicole Kidman. This PG-13 movie was 
better than 1 had expected. Directed by Nora Ephron. 
"Bewitched" is a film based on the old sitcom. It is 
about a producer remaking the sitcom who casts a real 

wit*^^- JARED SHEATZ 

Ivanich performs recital 

Amber Ivanich, music education major, performed her 
senior clarinet recital on Oct. 1 at 7:30 p.m. in Hart 
Chapel. The program included Carl Maria von Weber's 
"Grand Duo Concertant" with Bonnie Ferguson, piano. 
Amber Ivanich played Tbdd Chadwick's "Trio in F 
Minor" with Jill Ivanich, flute, and Tbdd Chadwick. 
guitar. JEANNETTE GOOD 

The Berlin Project farewell 

The Berlin Project, alternative pop-rock band from the 
Pittsburgh area, will play the third of three farewell 
shows in Pittsburgh on Oct. 8 at Mr. Smalls. Doors 
open at 6 p.m. Lead guitarist John Garrighan founded 
the band in 1995. Since, the band has seen many line- 
up changes. JEANNETTE GOOD 



'Serenity/ every sci-fi geelt's dream 




Natlian Staliiman 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

"Serenity" 

Director: Joss Whedon 
Universal Studios 
rating :4. 5/5 

^lll ^li '^li '^lt 4 

A feature length adapta- 
tion of the 2002 sci-fi series 
"Firefly," "Serenity" is set 
500 years in the future 
aboard a transport ship 
called, you guessed it, 
Serenity. 

The captain of Serenity, 
Malcolm Reynolds (Nathan 
Fillion), was recently on the 
receiving end of a major ass 
kicking in an intergalactic 



war. Now Mai, along with 
his loyal crew, are a bunch 
of petty criminals taking on 
any job they can get as long 
as it pays. Serenity takes on 
two new passengers. Dr. 
Simon Tam (Sean Maher) 
and his unstable telepathic 
sister River (Summer Glau), 
who just happen to be fugi- 
tives from the Alliance, the 
very same alliance Mai was 
at war with years earlier. 

Why are Simon and River 
running from the Alliance? 
Simon broke his sister out of 
an Alliance psychological 
testing facility where they 
were attempting to turn her 
into a living "super 
weapon." Being psychic. 
River "heard, or saw" some- 
thing that nobody was sup- 
posed to know. The Alliance 
will stop at nothing to make 
sure the secret River has in 
her head stays there. The 
crew of Serenity now finds 
themselves in a race to stay 
alive and figure out what 
the dream that haunts 
River really means. 

When I went to see this 
film, I didn't know it was an 



adaptation of a television 
show. All I knew was it had 
a chick in it who could kick 
ass like Jessica Alba in 
"Dark Angel," and every sci- 
fi geek in the country was 
pitching a tent waiting for it 
to open. Going on the geek 
theory and Summer Glau 
not being as hot as Jessica 
Alba (I'll admit, I was a fan 
of "Dark Angel"), I didn't 
have high expectations for 
this movie. Had I known it 
was a television adaptation, 
I may not have even seen it, 
given the sad list of great 
TV shows recently adapted 
to film. 

As it turns out, it was a 
good thing I didn't hear 
about this movie being 
adapted from television and 
never saw the show it's 
based on. 

I was more than pleasant- 
ly surprised upon watching 
"Serenity." The actors, who 
happen to be the same 
actors used in the series, 
were excellent. I don't know 
how I never heard of these 
people or the TV show. Even 
the Baldwin (Adam), who 



played the Jayne (the hired 
muscle in this movie) was a 
good actor, of course he's not 
related to THE Baldwin 
brothers (this could explain 
why he's actually talented). 

The plot line in this movie 
was magnificent. I love 
when movies surprise me. 
This one had enough twists 
and turns to keep me guess- 
ing but not so many that 1 
couldn't follow the story. 1 
know a lot of people don't 
like to think too much when 
they're watching a movie 
and others don't like watch- 
ing dumb, unintelligent 
movies. This one is almost 
perfectly balanced between 
the two extremes to make it 
enjoyable for everyone. 

Finally, the special effects 
were dazzling. The original 
series won an Emmy for out- 
standing visual effects and I 
wouldn't be surprised if the 
film won a similar award. 

I do like science fiction, 
but I don't really consider 
myself a geek. I liked this 
movie so much that I'm put- 
ting the series on my Netflix 
list so I can see where this 




Photo courtesy of image.net/Sldney Baldwin 

Lead in - From left to right are crew and passengers of the 
Serenity, a transport-for-hire ship caught between warring forces 
out to dominate the galaxy: ADAM BALDWIN as Jayne, JEWEL 
STAITE as Kaylee, ALAN TUDYK as Wash, GINA TORRES as Zoe, 
NATHAN FILLION as Captain Malcolm Reynolds, SEAN MAHER ' 
as Simon and SUMMER GLAU as River. 



film came from. Go see this 
movie. Don't tell the geeks I 
said this, but I liked this 



movie better than the 
three Star Wars films. 



last 



In a facaf Iband? 



Send" your press info to : 



The Clarion CaU 

270 Gemmell Complex 

Clarion, PA 16214 



^ant pour comic to appear in 
Cfie Clarion CaU? 

^top bp tije office or email it to 
taU(gcIarion.elJu 




DlliDIOySICii;"iAi, 
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Page 10 



Tffi CLARION CikLL 



October 6. 2005 



CluiiM 



liiiH'k \k Tnivii Einployml, For Rf nl, fmmk and Geneml ids 



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CongfHtulations to our 
Sister of the Week, Jaissa! 
Ijove, ^(t>E 

Congrats Sister of the Week 
Sarah Schmitz and Chair of 
the Week Sara Hoover! 
liove. Your AZ Sisters 

Happy 21st Annie, Rachel. 

and Michelle! 

■Love. Your AZ Sisters 

Congrats Walker, Jersey 

and Shannon on making 

court! 

•Love, Your AZ Sisters 

(ireat job at the fashion 
show Janelle and Jess! 
•V. Your AIT Sisters 

Keep up the good work new 
members! We're so proud of 
you! 
■AIT 

Congratulations Jon 

DeSantis on becoming our 
new Tau Tiger. 
-AIT 

Happy Birthday Tasha! 
•1> Your AIT Sisters 

Congrats to the Shlubby of 
the Week Raleigh Johnson! 
-KAP 

Congrats to the Brother of 
the Week Curt Snell! 
Thanks for helping with the 
bill 
-KAP 

Thanks Frank for doing a 



great job with the tloat! 
•KAP 

Welcome Greek alumni! 
•KAP 

Kurt. 

Thanks foi- writing that 

good letter. 

•KAP 

Congrats Grant on the H 

point! 

-KDR 

GENERAL 

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PERSONALS 



Ix)ve to the Shady Ladies! 
•Amber 



Mommy, 






IXirn down 


your 


hottness. 


you're maki 


ng me 


thirsty. 


Dusty 







Jolly, 

Happy 21st birthday! You're 

gonna yak! 

Ijove, Chelsey, Jamie. Mel. 

Hawk. Paul. Tom, Meghan. 



Dusty, Mike and (^hris 

Jamie, 

The oven knob is missing. 

The floor is sticky. 

You are the only one who 

can fix it. 

Now is not the time to be 

picky. 

•Mel 

Dan. 

Santa was right. I am madly 
and deeply in love with you. 
Please say that you will be 
mine forever, even though I 
■'paper cutted" your eye. 
liOve. Ash 

J-Money, 

Octoberfest will be glorious. 

I'm not anticipating it or 



anything. Miss you. Muah! 
• l.«ve. T-Money 

To the PGH Udies. 

I can fix any toilet with 

ease. Thank me for keeping 

the floor dry. 

■Love, Tinker Bell 

Toddler. 

Hope your "special" R.V. 

Park field trip didn't make 

you want to leave me. 

LYMTWCS! 

•V Ashley and Pugbum 

Jeff. 

Thanks for the kickin' party 
and the water tissues. Oh, 
and I'm still going to buy 
you some pop tarts today. 
-Love, YW 





Photograph Courtesy of The United Way of Clarion County 
UNITED WAY RAISES MONEY FOR COMMUNITY-^ On Oct. Iat6 a.m. the United Way of 
Clarion County held a 5K race to raise funds to build handicap rannps for the local corr]muni- 
ty. There were 212 participants in the race and $2,500 was raised. 



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October 6. 2005 



^%fU 



THE CLARION CALL 



Page 11 



k%m 



Emts 



litTiMmh 




larion 
coreboard 



Cross Country 

Sept. 10 

@ Thiel 

W: lof 12; M: lof9 

Sept. 16 
@ Slippery Rock 
W: 19-39, W; 
M: 42-19, L 

Sept. 24 

@ St. Vincent 

W: 1 of li; M: 1 of 

FootbaU 

Aug. 26 

@ West Chester 

14-43, L 

Sept. 3 
Kutztown 
29-23, W (40T) 

Sept. 17 
Mansfield 
15-12, W 

Sept. 24 
@ California 
7-43, L 
Oct. 1 
@ Edinboro 
0-44, L 

Golf 

Sept 9-10 _,^^^_,__ 
(^tThio vajreylnvite 
4th of 16 
Sept 18-19 



Hal Hansen Invite 
(@ Clarion Oaks) 
3rd of 18 

Oct. 1 

W&J Invite 
1st of 9 

Oct. 2-3 

Wheeling Jesuit Invite 

4th of 12 



Soccer 

Sept. 19 
Indiana 
0-4, L 

Sept. 23 
Gannon 
2-1, W 

Sept. 27 
Slippey Rock 
1-4, L 

Oct. 1 
@ Indiana 
1-3, L 

Tennis 

Sept. 17 
Bloomsburg 
1-8, L 

Sept. 29 
Jrove City 
8-1, W 



Sept. 30 

@ East Stroudsburg 

9-0, W 

Oct. 1 
@ Niagara 
1-7, L 

VoUeyball 

Sept. 24 
Shippensburg 
3-0, W 

Sept.24 
West Chester 
3-0, W 

Sept. 27 
Edinboro 
3-0, W 

Sept. 30-Oct. 1 
Hohday Inn Classic 
Geneva 
3-1, W 

Shippensburg 
3-1, W 

Anderson 
3-1, W 

East Stroudsburg 
3-0, W 

Oct. 4 

@ Lodt Haven 

0-3, L 



CU at Athletic Events 


Cross Country 


Gk)lf 


Volleyball 


Oct. 8 


Oct. 15-16 


Oct. 7-8 


@ Carnegie Mellon 


@ PSAC Championships 


PSAC Crossover 
Tournament («} Edinboro 


Oct. 15 


Soccer 




@ Waynesburg 


Oct. 7 


Oct. 11 




Pitt-Johnstown 


@ Slippery Rock 


Oct. 29 






@ PSAC Championships 


Oct. 11 


Oct. 18 


(Slippery Rock) 


West Chester 


California 




Oct. 15 


Oct. 21-22 


Football 


@ Slippery Rock 


@ Shippensburg (Regional) 


East Stroudsburg 


Oct. 17 


Oct. 25 


(HOMECOMING) 


Lock Haven 


Indiana 


Oct. 15 


Oct. 19 


Nov. 1 


Lock Haven 


@ California 


@ Edinboro 


Oct. 22 


Oct. 21 


Nov. 5 


@ Shippensburg 


@ Salem 


Lock Haven 


Oct. 29 


Oct. 23 


Nov 11-12 


Indiana 




("' PSAC Championships 



'SmMMING' conmued from 
page 12 

that all the swimming and 
diving coaches are just like 
parents to them. 

"They ask us about our 
grades, about how we are 
feehng today, and ask us 
what is wrong when we're 
down," Kalata said. 

Whatever their influence 
has been, each of them has 
been driven by it and driven 
to succeed. 

With just one major train- 
ing hurdle to complete, the 
upcoming training trip 
planned for Florida, these 



women are chomping at the 
bit to get out and compete. 
On a personal level each 



« 



/ want to get better 
and do my very best 
to improve. 

- Mary Elizabeth 
Kaveney 



also had a particular indi- 
vidual accomplishment in 
mind. 



"I'll be trying to make the 
relay team for nationals," 
said Hanzl. "1 want to get 
better and do my very best 
to improve," said Kaveney. 

"We want to ensure our 
selves a spot at PSAC's," 
said of herself and 
Rhodaberger. 

Ultimately though, each 
expressed that they want to 
win PSAC's and felt that 
their team and the Clarion 
men's team could and would 
accomplish that goal. 

"We're one big family; 
that's the main thing when 
it comes down to it," Hanzl 
said. 



WANTED: 

Sports Photographer 

Contact Mel at 393-2380 



Eatj Drtf^k'dHBreathe^i^ealthier 



rm^'^ 



Jt>n Cs^' Vatty I .etvis 

Grand Ave. Exf. Clarion 




10/6/05 



Doug Kncpp Intraniural, Recreation, «& Club Sport Director 393-1667 



Dodgeball Tounianieiit Results 

Mon(liiy.lO/3 First Round 
B,xBalla/. KDR 2-1 

Woniiin SiilTragc Team Beat it 2-0 

NADS Second to None 2-0 

S. n. Wa fflc Irons Ti ash Monkeys 2-0 

Tuesday, 10/4 Senii-l'inid.s 
Second to None KDR 2 

Trash Monkeys Stop Woman Suffiagc 2-0 

Team Beat It NADS 2-0 

Sll. Wamelron.s F.x Bulla/ 2-0 

Wed, 10/5 Finals Kx BhIIm/. \s S. II. Waine Irons 

Ultimate Fiisbee Results 

liK-sdHy, I0'4 

(ilass Box ol'Emotion Badunk-u-dunk [>cr 

The Ciuacs ROC 8- 1 

Americans The Avcraac .Iocs V 




Vo 


lleybull Results 


TucMlav. 927 






D Phi L 


lQl\i: Announced 21-12,21-19 


Beth Mudrcy 


(iirb 


12'2L2M7,2I"18 


Sc.Ky Women 


Delta /,eitt 


1.^-12. IS- 10 


Delta /.eta 


We Siiek 


score nni 


ChmCV 


Incredibles 


scoie n 'a 


The Tuna THCosAlhlet, Cliallcnged 


score w'n 


ThuisdBy. 9/22 






Don't C'ha*s 


Delta /,clu 


V 


Beth Mudrcy 


D Phi U 


[' 


Team RT 


Sexy Womun 


score n/a 






Flag Kootball Results 




'liiesciay 


. 1 0/4 






Lunatics 




KDR 


.^3-2 < 


Hall/. Deep 




Just Hall 


27-14 


Ifard Muffins 




Annex oTI'R 


4') 4.S 


Beer.s 




Stcclcis 


iv'» 


Prime Tinje 




Schlit/ 


40-16 


Free Bailers 




Boondock SHinis 


30 20 


Dudes Wc Can" 


tS. 


ST. Mil 


50-14 


Hcnch Hn's«i 1 h 


s 


Nuphici. 


2.S-9 


Da IJiisila/ 




Qinck (» 


6320 


No Ma'am 




Lady (' anes 


.U-2<) 




0/6/05 




Ijike Rttnsom receives an X-Box pij/c packjigc 
irom ASIC dtiriii^i our last "Bracket Mayhem" 
eontesi. Watch for details on (iitine coniesis!' 

IN-IJut? Hockev Results 

luesday. 10 4 
Icelandic Sc\ Killcn.s Puck I f 4 2 

fcrminuiors Wannabees V2 

T)runk Bandits Slow 1 .earners 7 I 

Outdoor Soccer rournamcnt Results 

JticsdHy, 10 4 
Criisher.s Kagmg Khuu)'i L)i)iiblc I I 

Team No. 2 I he Brew (Veu ^-2 Shoot-oui 

Semi fmal natehes vvil) be luesdav, 10 1 1 
inicrnatioMals vs TB.A &. Tcuni «l vs 1 cam •'^J 
Championship game is slaied Toi llui 10 I "^ 

Intramural 's on the U eh 

clarioii.edu/iittramurals 



^^^^mmi mmiim'm 



mm 



page 12 



TDK CLAMON CALL 



October 6. 2005 



Ml 



Tedaj : Vimn fttmsnn minimiBg iuid iivinf 



Ryan tornmiui 



Underclassmen learn ins and outs of 
Golden Eagle swimming and diving 



Josh Woods 
Sports Editor 

sjjlwooclsl@clarion,edu 



Lindsay Hanzl, Liz 
Khodaberger. Mary 

Elizabeth Kaveney and 
Nicole Kalata all have a few 
things in common^ they are 
all underclassmen and they 
are all learning the ins and 
outs of Clarion University's 
women's swimming and div- 
ing team. 

Lured to Clarion by the 
mystifying title of "number 
one in the country" and 
their own personal connec- 
tions, all four these under- 
classmen have found being a 
Golden Eagle is challenging, 
yet satisfying. 

Rhodaberger, whose high 
school coach was a diver for 
Coach Hvorak, said her 
biggest challenge has been 
adjusting to the many 
nuances of college diving, 
including a daunting six feet 
differential in height of the 
diving board. "Going from a 
one meter board to a three 
meter board has taken me 
awhile to get used to," she 
said. 

The others have found a 
more intense training pro- 
gram has been the cause of 
difficulty. As the Oct 22 
home-opener nears, the 
swimmers and divers have 
been participating in vigor- 



ous workouts that include 
lifting, extra swimming and 
"dry land" exercises that 
include cardio, abs, isola- 
tion, and resistance work- 
outs. 

"The program is so 
intense, but you have to 
strive to do your best. 
Everyone here is just as 
good as you if not better ... 
it's not high school; you're 



The program is so 
intense, but you have 
to strive to do your 
best. Everyone here is 
just as good as you if 
not better ... it's not 
high school; you're 
not the top dog any- 
more" 

- Lindsay Hanzl 



not the top dog anymore," 
said Hanzl. 

"You go from being number 
one to being nothing, which 
is good because it really 
makes you have to push 
yourself, "added 
Rhodaberger. 

Despite these difficulties, 
many positives exist within 
the program as well. 
Whether it is the coaching, 



upperclassmen influence or 
just the title of being a 
Golden Eagle the four all 
have their own distinct rea- 
soning for why their experi- 
ence has been an enjoyable 
one. 

Hanzl, sophomore transfer 
student from Widener 
University, is competing 
with her older sister again, 
which she had been able to 
do in high school. "I missed 
competing with her because 
she is my motivator. On top 
of that Clarion was a better 
fit for me," she said. "The 
program, the people and the 
coaches are all amazing 
here." 

Kaveney and Kalata find 
their strength in the upper- 
classmen that offer words of 
encouragement to them 
after each practice. "We're 
not freshman to them, we're 
part of the team," said 
Kaveney. "They always tell 
us we can do it and they 
hang out with us all the 
time," added Kalata. 

"The coaches, it's the 
coaches," exclaimed 

Rhodaberger bursting at the 
bubble in an effort stress 
her point of view. "I love 
them; they truly are the best 
in the country." At that sug- 
gestion the others quickly 
agreed, with each saying , 

See 'SWIMMING' page 11 , 




Photo courtesy of Coach Daniel Caulfleld 

ERIN RICHARD- continued her undefeated streak for the Clarion University Cross Country 
team finishing in a time of 18:19 to take top honors in Saturday's annual United Way 5K. The 
event is open to the community and is held each year in conjunction vv/t/i A.L.F. week. 



Sports feature: 



■-J* 



Cornman fills role of sports director at WCUB-TV 



Josh Woods 
Sports Editor 

sjlwooclsl@clanon.edu 



Senior Ryan Cornman was 
voted WCUB TV's new 
sports director for the 2005 
academic year by its execu- 
tive board last spring and is 
already transforming his 
sports department into a 
perfect game. 

Cornman, Ford City High 
School graduate and com- 
munication major at 
Clarion, chose to apply for 
the position after several 
friends and family urged 
him. 

"I have been working at 
WCUB since my freshman 
year and I just knew in my 
heart that under the right 
leadership that the depart- 
ment could be taken to new 
heights," said Cornman in a 
recent interview. 

for Ryan Comman the 
new leadership role trans- 
lates to being responsible for 
overseeing, producing and 
directing three live, weekly 
shows; overseeing sports 
reports for the stations' 
news, distributing coverage 
assignments to all of the 
department's staff and 
deciding on the content of 
all the station's sports pro- 
grams. 

Because of the graduation 
of many of the sports 
department staff, including 
its former director, those 
tasks have become more dif- 
ficult to perform. 

"To this point my biggest 
challenge has been all of the 
people that need to be 
trained because it is very 
time-consuming," he said. "I 
spend a lot of nights shut- 
ting down the studio by 
myself and making deci- 
sions based on what is best 
for the department." 




Josh Woods/ni0 Clarion C»ll 

RYAN CORNMAN - seen here editing video footage in the confines of the Becker Hall TV studio is the new sports director for 
Clarion University's WCUB-TV. Cornman whose goal it is to make the sports department the best it can be, has already taken the 
bull by the horns in his first month on the job. To date, he has trained several freshmen communication majors and produced a 
new show. 



Cornman, whose next step 
was to get first hand experi- 
ence in applying them. 

The sports director posi- 
tion has amply provided the 
opportunity for that applica- 
tion process to take place. 

"My goal is to apply all 
that I have learned and try 
to make not only the sports 
department but the whole 
station as a whole better 
and build up its reputation 
for those who will fulfill 
positions here in the future 
as well as the leaders that 
work here now," Cornman 
said. 

Now that the application 
process has been set into 
motion, there is only one 
thing left to do: graduate 
and put all of the skills 
learned here at Clarion 
University to the ultimate 
test in what Cornman called 
the "big, bad real world." 
For now though, Cornman is 
content to enjoy the time 
spent with his friends here 
at school, many of whom he 
met at while working at 
WCUB. 

"Right now I just want to 
enjoy spending time with 
everyone before I set off to 
find a decent job and get 
myself in the door some- 
where," he said with a 
smile. 



A month into the job, those 
decisions seem to be paying 
off. The sports reports on 
the news have looked sharp 
and professional, sports 
anchors and co-hosts on the 
other programs have 
appeared well-dressed and 
informed and the interviews 
for both have been conduct- 
ed with confidence and tact. 

And on top of that, a brand 
new show has been created 
and aired in an effort to 
expand WCUB's sports cov- 
erage beyond the realm of 



the college student. "High 
School Highlight Reel," the 
brainchild of executive 
board member Matthew 
Eidemiller and the physical 
product of Cornman offers a 
sports show exclusively 
aimed at giving the commu- 
nity an in-depth look at local 
high school athletics. 

"Overall my experience so 
far has been positive. I'm 
gaining hands on experience 
and getting to work in a pro- 
fessional environment 
before going out into the 



work world," said Cornman. 
"I'm learning "on the job" 
without the worry of losing 
it." 

On that note, the sports 
director position may be 
seen in a broader perspec- 
tive when it comes to 
Cornman, as it has truly 
been a major building block 
in his wall of success. 

Prior to working at WCUB 
the first block was laid over 
the summer in the form of 
an internship with WTOV 9, 
an NBC affiliate located in 



Steubenville, Ohio. 

"I got to learn a lot of dif- 
ferent things ... how to 
shadow reporters, write 
news stories, produce, 
observe live newscasts, edit 
packages, produce sound 
bites, set up live camera 
shots and stand ups," said 
Cornman. 

With all of that knowledge 
in hand, many lessons were 
learned and dually noted. 
Time management and 
leadership skills topped the 
list of those lessons for 



ATTENTION 

SPORTS FANS! 

Want to write 

for The Clarion 

Cain 

Contact: 

Josh Woods 
393-2380 




Yoga classes offered 

See Features page 8 



ne copy free 



Autumn leaves you breathless 

Annual photo essay pages 6 and 7 




i 




THE CLARIOl 




Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 




Volume 91 Issue 6 



October 13, 2005 




Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

Scientists find another 
dinosaur-bird 
WASHINGTON-Paleonto 
legists working in north- 
western Patagonia have 
unearthed the nearly 
complete skeleton of a 
small dinosaur whose 
bird-like appearance sug- 
gests that flight may have 
evolved twice not only in 
birds but also among the 
prehistoric raptors of the 
southern hemisphere. 

The newly discovered 
fossil, of a rooster sized 
carnivore known as a dro- 
maeosaur, lived 95 million 
years ago and is the oldest 
raptor ever found in the 
southern continents. Its 
discovery may signal that 
dromaeosaurs are much 
older than previously 
thought. 

New Orleans flood water 
not as toxic as fear, 
experts say 

NEW ORLEANS-The 
floodwater that covered 
New Orleans after 
Hurricane Katrina was 
not unusually toxic and 
was "typical of storm 
water runoff in the 
region," according to a 
study published Tuesday. 
Most of the gasoline- 
derived substances in the 
water evaporated quickly, 
and the bacteria from 
sewage also declined over 
time, the scientist leading 
the study said. The 
water's chief hazard was 
from metals that are 
potentially toxic to fish. 
However, no fish kills 
have been reported in 
Lake Pontchartrain, 

where the water that once 
covered 80 percent of the 
city was pumped. 

Firm allegedly 
encouraged theft of SAT 
booklets 

LOS ANGELES-In yet 
another indication of the 
high-pressure atmosphere 
surrounding college 

admissions, the owner of 
the SAT has taken court 
action to stop a 
California-based company 
from allegedly encourag- 
ing students to steal and 
then sell it copies of the 
college entrance exam. 

The College Board, the 
New York-based nonprofit 
that owns the test, was 
granted a temporary 
restraining order in feder- 
al court in Los Angeles on 
Friday. 

Miers' beliefs a factor 
WASHINGTON, D.C.- 
President Bush indicated 
that Harriet Miers' reli- 
gious beliefs were one rea- 
son he nominated her to 
the Supreme Court, com- 
ments that drew quick 
criticism from liberal 
groups who said religion 
should not be considered a 
qualification to sit on the 
United States' highest 
bench. White House 
deputy chief of staff Karl 
Rove said Miers was a 
committed evangelical 
Christian. 



Technology Fee Upgrades 

New resources at Clarion for Fall '05 



Katie Fischer 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kcfisher@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 11 - Clarion 
University students now 
have access to state-of-the- 
art technology in class- 
rooms, computer labs and 
the Rena M. Carlson 
Library thanks to the recent 
technology upgrades from 
computing services. The 
upgrades were implemented 
before the start of the 2005 
Fall semester, making them 
a new feature available to 
the returning and new stu- 
dents at Clarion University 
and its Venango campus. 

All of the projects were 
completed using funds from 
the $100 technology fee that 
students pay to the univer- 
sity. The Pennsylvania 
State System of Higher 
Education (PASSHE) imple- 
mented the fee several years 
ago with the intention of 



having the latest technolo- 
gies available to students. 

'These are great invest- 
ments for the university," 
said Sam Puleio, assistant 
vice president for computing 
services,"through them we 
are making a long term com- 
mitment for the students." 

The total cost of the 
upgrades was over 
$400,000, which was easily 
met from the $600,000 
brought in from the technol- 
ogy fees over the last school 
year. The money left over 
was put into escrow account 
and will be used for mainte- 
nance and upgrades of pre- 
vious technology fee proj- 
ects. 

This is not the first time 
that technology upgrades 
have been made to Clarion 
University. Computing 
Services makes it routine to 
complete a new set of 
upgrades before every fall 
semester 



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~;^ Additions to the wifeless laptop program at the Gemmell Student Complex. 

S 10 technology^enhanced dassfomns 

ft three for the College of Arts and Sctences 
ft two for the College of Business Adminrstration 
ft four for College of E^xatran and Human Services 

ii: one for Clarion University's- Venango Campus 

^ An inrtiatrve to integrate POA*! (Personal Data AssiftanQ into classrooms. 

S A mjcrofilm scar>ner arKi two woritstations for Carlson Library. 

Sd A nHjIti-TDcdia presentation and sound -^stem for Rhodes Auditorium 

for Clarion Universiity - Verwngo Campus. 
^ f<24i7 help desk for students and faculty on Blackboard 



Zire 72 PDAs for student use 




Jonathan Donelli/rfte Clarion Call 
MORE LAPTOPS AVAILABLE -Chad Shipley, left, and Justin 
Conklin use one of the university's wireless-enabled laptops. 



Brittnee Koebler 
Assistant Editor 

s_bekoebler@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Oct. 11 -As part 
of Clarion University's 
annual technology improve- 
ments, Personal Digital 
Assistants (PDAs) have 
recently been purchased for 
the Learning and 

'technology Center (LTC) , 
for student use. ^ ^,*'" 

The 35 Zire 72 PDAs that 
the university has pur- 
chased are small, light 
handheld computers, which 
can perform many tasks and 
also have the ability to be 
easily reprogrammed. 

"Faculty may check out 
the PDAs for use in a class 



or a project through the 
LTC; students would not 
check them out individually. 
The time they are checked 
out depends on the class and 
whether there are other fac- 
ulty that want to use them," 
said Jeanne Vilberg, manag- 
er of the Learning and 
Technology Center. These 
purchases were made possi- 
ble by the student technolo- 
gy fee of $100 that each stu- 
dent is required to pay. 

"I think it was a good idea 
for the university to make 
this purchase. The PDAs 
will allow students to use a 
different kind of technology 
that is very up to date and it 
seems to be very functional 
in a classroom setting," said 
freshman Jennifer 

Bombach. 



Senate removes senator 



■ Ben Eagleton 
removed after 
executive session 

Dan Edington 
Managing Editor 

CLARION Oct. 10 - The 
sixth meeting of student 
senate took place on Oct. 10 
in 246 Gemmell, where stu- 
dent senators discussed 
issues within senate and 
reported on upcoming cam- 
pus events. 

An executive session was 
called during the meeting to 
allow senate to discuss per- 
sonnel issues. That portion 
of the meeting was conduct- 
ed in secret and all individu- 
als not on senate were asked 
to leave. 

After 10 minutes of dia- 
logue, student senate then 
allowed guests back into the 
meeting and voted to 
remove Ben Eagleton, a sen- 
ator elected in April of 2005, 
from office. A vote of 12-9-0 
by secret ballot approved 
Eagleton's removal from 
senate. 

"There were many things 
both in senate and outside 
of senate that contributed to 
the decision of the executive 
board," said Cody Ressel, 
student senate vice presi- 
dent. 

An executive session was 
called during the meeting in 
which all individuals not on 



student senate were asked 
to leave. According to 
"Robert's Rules of Order," an 
executive session is any 
meeting where discussion is 
held in secret. Anyone on 
senate has the authority to 
motion for an executive ses- 
sion. In this case an execu- 
tive session was called by a 
member of the executive 
committee to discuss per- 
sonnel issues within senate. 

The executive committee 
consists of the president of 
student senate with the vice 
president; treasurer; chair 
person of rules, regulations 
and policies; and the parlia- 
mentarian of the student 
senate. 

Among the executive com- 
mittee's primary functions 
is the discussion of person- 
nel issues, in addition to 
advising the student senate 
president, assisting in the 
development of ethic guide- 
lines and evaluating goals of 
student senate. 

Senate refused to com- 
ment on the specific reasons 
for Eagleton's removal. 
Article IX, section 10, part 
four and C of student sen- 
ate's constitution was cited 
as the grounds for removal. 
Part four defines an excused 
absence. 

Part C states, "Any sena- 
tor accused or convicted of 
crimes or conduct that a 
majority of student senators 
find to be unbecoming of a 
representative of the 
Clarion University of 



Pennsylvania student sen- 
ate may be subject to a vote 
for removal from office." 

"We [executive committee] 
made the decision that we're 
not going to openly discuss 
anything regarding his 
removal. It was brought 
before senate, and the sen- 
ate voted on it and it was 



/ was very 
disappointed in the 
outcome of the 
situation. Being a 
senator was 
something I enjoyed 
greatly. I prided 
myself in 
representing the 
student body of 
Clarion, and I did so 
to the very best 
of my ability. 

- Former Senator 
Ben Eagleton 



decided," Ressel said. 

"I was very disappointed 
in the outcome of the situa- 
tion," said Eagleton. "Being 
a senator was something I 
enjoyed greatly. I prided 
myself in representing the 
student body of Clarion, and 
I did so to the very best of 
my ability. Regrettably, I 
made a few bad choices 



prior to having involvement 
I had with senate, and 
unfortunately these choices 
led to my removal from 
office. I think it's a sad 
injustice that I have been 
removed due to the deci- 
sions made in my past." 

Student senate's constitu- 
tion only says that a senator 
can be subject to a vote for 
removal for accused or con- 
victed crimes. It does not 
state specifically whether 
actions of a senator prior to 
their election are grounds 
for removal. 

"And I guess based on the 
outcome of the vote, the 
majority of the senators felt 
that way," said Ressel. 

Eagleton's position will be 
filled by an individual from 
a list of alternate senators. 
This list is compiled of 20 
senators who ran last April 
for senate but were not 
elected. These alternates 
are listed by the number of 
votes they received. 

Eagleton was a member of 
the committee on sub-com- 
mittees and the committee 
on rules, regulations and 
policies. Both of these roles 
will be filled by the new sen- 
ator. 

In addition to this change 
in role, senators were also 
encouraged to become more 
involved with the communi- 
ty. A new late night policy 
for all recognized student 
organizations (RSOs) was 
distributed to all RSO's 
mailboxes. 



According to howstuff- 
works.com, the Zire 72 PDA 
was the top seller out of five 
of the top PDAs now avail- 
able. Other examples of 
PDAs include: Palm 
Tungsten E2 Handhelds, 
Hewlett Packard iPAQ 
HX4705 Pocket PC, Hewlett 
Packard iPAQ RX3715 
Pocket PC and Pal Treo 650 
Handhelds. 

In addition, according to 
Carmen Carmack and Craig 
Freudenrich, Ph.D., of how- 
stuffworks.com, PDA's have 
evolved over the years and 
the capabilities continue to 
grow. 

"I think it's a good thing 
that these are available for 
students who would need to 
use one," said freshman 
Nikki Grimes. 

Student has 

Harrisburg 

internship 

Beth Kibler 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_eakibler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 12 - Clarion 
tudent, Graham Nkanza, is 
participating in an intern- 
ship in the Governor's Office 
of Planning and Policy. The 
internship, which runs for 
15 weeks, is sponsored by 
the Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher Education 
(PASSHE) and includes one 
students from all 14 schools 
in PASSHE. 

Nkanza is a junior eco- 
nomics major at Clarion. 
Originally from Zambia, 
Nkanza graduated in 2004 
from Mpelembe Secondary 
School there. Nkanza is the 
son of Captain Graham and 
Clarice Nkanza. 

The Harrisburg Internship 
Semester (THIS) program 
has given hundreds of stu- 
dents insight and know-how 
into the processes of 
Pennsylvania state govern- 
ment since its inception in 
1989. The internship prom- 
ises students interaction 
with different government 
agencies. Students involved 
will also have the opportuni- 
ty to complete several aca- 
demic seminars and are 
expected to undertake an 
individual research project. 
PASSHE is the largest 
provider of higher education 
in the state. Over 106,000 
students are enrolled in the 
I 14 state-owned universities. 



Page 2 



Tlffi CLAWON CALL 



October 13. 2005 



October 13. 2005 



TmCLAMONCALL 



Page 3 



lews 



Various Clarion departments see ciiecltslieet ciianges 



Jeffry Richards 

Ass/stant Circulation Manager 

sjpricharcls@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 11 - Several 
departments at Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania 
have seen changes in their 
programs recently, includ- 
ing the communication 
department. The communi- 
cation department has 
undergone several changes 
in the required courses in 
order to meet national stan- 
dards. 

The reason for the changes 
was for the department to 
meet the Accreditation 
Council of Education in 
Journalism Mass 

Communication or ACE- 
JMC. The ACEJMC is an 
organization that recognizes 
universities nationally for 
their programs. According to 
the head of the 
Communication depart- 
ment. Dr. Susan Hilton, the 
department has never met 
the accreditation before 
because it was already a 
unique program. The facul- 
ty have finally made 
changes to the curriculum 
and made the changes in 
requirements. 

"This is the result of two 
years of deliberation of the 
faculty," said Hilton, "I 



think it's excellent." 

Changes to the check sheet 
include a slight reduction in 
core courses, more produc- 
tion courses, new liberal 
education electives, a new 
analysis category, and now 
as students are required to 
take one upper level writing 
class instead of two. The 



advisor to run the 061 
audit," Hilton said. The 
audit will compare the new 
and old check sheet and see 
which would be more benefi- 
cial for the student. Second 
semester juniors and second 
semester sophomores will be 
most affected by the check 
sheet changes. 




Jonathan Donelll/rhe Clarion Call 

CHECKSHEET CHANGES - The communication department 
along with the math and speech communication departments 
are changing their checksheets so that they can stay up to date 
in their fields of study. 



new check sheet will be 
available for the spring 2006 
schedule, though currently 
enrolled students are still 
able to follow the old one. 

"One of the things stu- 
dents can do is ask their 



The concentration of the 
check sheet is on the profes- 
sional courses, while the 
other classes are used to 
prepare students for those 
courses. It is Hilton's hope 
that the University and the 



Pennsylvania state system 
of higher education will be 
very supportive of the 
department's "commitment 
to excellence." The faculty 
has worked hard to figure 
out what the students need 
by talking to internship 
facilities, professionals in 
the field and alumni and 
learning more about the 
changes in the different 
fields. 

Hilton saidd, "Both stu- 
dents and families may be 
looking for accredited pro- 
grams." She went on to say, 
"We want to guarantee 
future and current students 
that we are operating on the 
highest level." 

The department will hold 
off on any other changes for 
the time being in order to 
asses the current changes. 
The biggest restriction on 
altering the check sheet is 
finding faculty to cover 
added courses. 

Other departments are 
also seeing changes. The 
Department of Mathematics 
is offering a computation 
science course in the fall of 
2006, and the department of 
Speech Communication will 
be offering an online envi- 
ronmental rhetoric course in 
the spring, as well as remov- 
ing a prerequisite course. 



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iJim VandeHei 

Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 



WASHINGTON, Oct. 12 - 
New York Times reporter 
Judith Miller testified for a 
second time in the CIA leak 
case Wednesday, providing 
new details about a previ- 
ously undisclosed conversa- 
tion she had with Vice 
President Dick Cheney's 
chief of staff about the diplo- 
mat at the center of the 22- 
month investigation. 

Miller was told by special 
prosecutor Patrick J. 
Fitzgerald that she is done 
testifying in the case and 
free to return to work with- 
out a contempt of court 
threat hanging over her 
head, her lawyers said. 
Miller refused to comment 
after spending nearly 75 
minutes in front of the 
grand jury 

"The contempt has been 
lifted and I am delighted 
that Judy can go forward 
with her great reporting," 
said Robert S. Bennett, 
Miller's attorney. 

Miller, who spent 85 days 
in jail for refusing to testify 
in the case, told the grand 
jury about a June 23, 2003, 
conversation she had with I. 
Lewis "Scooter" Libby, 
Cheney's top adviser, 
regarding former ambassa- 
dor Joseph C. Wilson IV, 
who had accused the White 
House of twisting intelli- 
gence to justify the Iraq war. 

Bennett refused to discuss 
Miller's testimony, but 
lawyers in the case said 



Fitzgerald appears increas- 
ingly interested in whether 
White House officials were 
involved in a broad effort to 
discredit Wilson as early as 
May or June of 2003, in part 
by unmasking his wife, CIA 
operative Valerie Plame. 

Wilson was sent on a CIA- 
funded mission to Niger in 
2002 — at the suggestion of 
his wife — to investigate 
whether Iraq had sought to 
buy nuclear weapons-grade 
material in Niger. Libby and 
Karl Rove, the president's 
top political adviser, have 
testified they each discussed 
Plame with two reporters in 
July of 2003 but never men- 
tioned her by name or her 
covert status at the agency, 
according to lawyers 
involved in the case. The 
two officials have testified 
that they were trying to 
wave reporters off Wilson's 
allegation. 

The June 23 conversation 
would be significant if 
Miller and Libby discussed 
Plame, the lawyers in the 
case said. If they did, it 
could help Fitzgerald estab- 
lish that Libby was involved 
in an administration effort 
to unmask Plame weeks 
before she was publicly 
outed by conservative 
columnist Robert D. Novak 
in the middle of July. 

As early as May of that 
year, Cheney's office was 
actively seeking information 
about Wilson from the CIA, 
according to former senior 
administration officials. 




The Clarion Call provides a synopsis of all criminal 
investigations as conducted by the Clarion University 
Public Safety for the month of October 2005. All infor- 
mation can be accessed on the Public Safety Web page. 

■ Joseph Birmingham, 23, of McMurray, Pa., on Oct. 8 
at about 2^29 a.m. was seen by university police throw- 
ing a yellow caution tape on the sidewalk area of Wood 
Street and Wilson Avenue. When university police ques- 
tioned Birmingham he gave police the name of John 
Jack Flynn. During the investigation, Birmingham did 
give police his correct name and on Oct. 11 a criminal 
complaint was filed charging Birmingham with 
Scattering Rubbish and False identification to Law 
Enforcement Authorities. 

■ Christopher Schrum, 22, of York, Pa., on Oct. 10 uni- 
versity police were dispatched to Ralston Hall to inves- 
tigate a possible assault. Schrum was arrested and 
arraigned before District Justice Kundance on public 
drunkenness and simple assault charges. Schrum had 
became involved in a argument with a resident in 
Ralston Hall and police saw physical markings on the 
victims face, neck and arms. Schrum was committed to 
Clarion County Jail with his bail posted at $5,000.00. 

■ Kaitlyn Jones, 19, of Chambersburg, Pa., officers 
were dispatched to 711 Wilkinson Hall on Oct. 10 for a 
female vomiting who was also deemed to be out of con- 
sciousness from drinking shots of Bacardi Rum. Jones 
was transported by ambulance to Clarion Hospital. 

■ Oct. 10, at 2^29 a.m., university police were dis- 
patched to Nair Hall for a active fire alarm. Officers 
found that unknown actor(s) had removed the fire 
extinguisher on the third floor fire box and set the 
extinguisher off in tKe two elevators, which set the fire 
alarm off. Anyone with information should contact uni- 
versity police. ,p , 

■ Jermaine Huell, 26, of Clarion, Pa. On Oct 9, at lldft 
a.m. was trying to enter a dance that was taking place 
at Gemmell. An officer and an employee told the male 
that he could not enter the building after 1 a.m. 
Another officer approached the male from behind 

and also informed him that he wasn't going to enter 
Gemmell. Huell became disorderly and refused to leave. 
When asked for identification he refused and used 
obscene language and became loud. Huell started to 
turn away from the officer when the officer grabbed him 
twice by the wrist, which initiated Huell into pushing 
the officer twice. Huell was then sprayed with a pepper 
spray and fled from the police. The officer chased Huell 
to the 100 block of Eighth Ave. were he was found hid- 
ing under a vehicle. Huell was placed under arrest and 
was placed in Clarion County Jail with a $10,000.00 
bail. 

■ Sean Kearney, 22, of Beaver Falls, Pa., was cited for 
public drunkeness after being observed staggering and 
falling into the side of Wilkinson Hall and found to be 
intoxicated. 

■ Patrick Kubica, 20, of Pittsburgh, Pa., was stopped 
for purposely knocking over a wooden horse. Kubica 
was cited for underage consumption. 

■ Michael Rothmeyer, 20, of Pittsburgh, Pa., was cited 
for underage consumption while being at a location of 
another incident. 

■ Ryan Stutzman, 21, of Sandy Lake, Pa. Oct. 8 at 
about i:56 a.m., university police saw a male staggering 
by Becht Hall. He was issued a citation for public 
drunkenness. 

■ Michael Lepore, 19, of New Castle, Pa. an officer 
responded outside of Wilkinson Hall for a complaint 
that a window was broken out of the stairwell door of 
Wilkinson Hall. Lepore was in the area at the time the 
window was broken out. He was under the age of 21 and 
under the influence of alcohol. Anyone with information 
about the broken window is asked to contact Public 
Safety. 



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Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 



Weather complicates 
relief efforts 



MUZAFFARABAD, Pakistan, Oct. 11 — ^Ibrrential rain 
and hail slowed relief efforts Tuesday near ground zero of 
last weekend's massive earthquake as hundreds of 
injured survivors continued to stream into makeshift 
hospitals in devastated cities. 

— The afternoon storm that 
rolled across Kashmir's 
towering Hindu Kush 

mountains grounded relief 

'~^~~""'''~~~''""'"~""~''''~" flights into the region and 
threatened to set off new landslides and collapse build- 
ings still standing after Saturday's 7.6 magnitude tem- 
blor. 

In the northern Pakistani city of Mansehra, the deluge 
flooded tents that doctors had used to perform surgeries 
and forced stretcher-bearers to slog through soupy mud 
with injured patients that included several girls in torn 
school uniforms. 

They were among 40 students reported rescued in near- 
by Balakot after being trapped beneath the rubble of 
their schools for more than three days. Most of the hun- 
gry, dehydrated children would need to have limbs 
amputated because gangrene had set in while they wait- 
ed to be rescued, doctors said. 

The corpses of another 60 students were pulled out of 
the Shaheen Foundation School Monday night, according 
to local reports from a once-picturesque holiday town 
nestled in a mountain valley. 

Pakistan's confirmed death toll reached 23,000 Tuesday 
with more than 50,000 others injured, the interior min- 
istry said. United Nations officials estimate more than 
2.5 million people were made homeless by the quake. 

Another 1,400 people have been confirmed dead in 
India, and 4,300 injured. Soldiers in Indian Kashmir 
found the bodies of 60 road workers Tuesday on a bus 
buried in an avalanche set off by the quake. 

India's army is heading the rescue and relief effort in 
its portion of Kashmir and like Kashmiris on the 
Pakistani side, many complained that help is coming too 
slowly. 

Amir Ali, 35, criticized the territory's civilian authori- 
ties after being airlifted to safety by an Indian army hel- 
icopter from a village 500 yards from the Pakistan bor- 
der. 

"We have been sleeping in the open for three nights 
now," he complained. "We immediately need tents and 
blankets or else our children, most of whom are already 
injured will perish in the cold." - ' ' 

Yasin Malik, a separatist leader and chairman of the 
Jammu and Kashmir Liberation Front, said the territo- 
ry's administration "had completely collapsed, so much 
so that in some of the mountainous areas, even children 
have been going without water." 

The roads into northern Pakistan's devastated cities, 
including Mansehra, Balakot and Muzaffarabad, capital 
of Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, were clogged Tuesday 
with hundreds of trucks packed with relief food, clothing 
and blankets provided by Pakistani charities. 

Eager to help survivors who had been waiting three 
days for help, many ordinary Pakistanis filled up their 
cars with supplies and headed north. U.S. mihtary heli- 
copters were able to evacuate several survivors from 
Muzaffarabad early Tuesday, but the afternoon storm 
grounded most relief flights. 

Thousands of stunned survivors continued to scavenge 
through the ruins of Muzaffarabad, or struggled to get 
their hands on relief supplies being tossed from the back 
of trucks. Many wore surgical masks, or pieces of cloth 
tied over their noses, to mask the stench of decomposing 
bodies. 

The powerful thunderstorm turned daylight into twi- 
light, broken by flashes of lightning, and forced thou- 
sands to seek shelter next to unstable buildings. 

When the dark clouds burst, the storm lashed the city 
with heavy rain and pea-sized hail. The downpour sent 
rivulets down mountainsides where huge boulders and 
jagged rocks were loosened by the quake and its numer- 
ous aftershocks. 

A building collapsed in the deluge at the Ayub Medical 
Complex in Abbotobad, a key frontline trauma center, 
where thousands of survivors are camped out in tents. 
Balakot, where the quake leveled all but a few buildings. 



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Faculty senate looks at deficit 



Lindsay Grystar 
Assistant News Editor 

s_llgrystar®clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 11 - The 
Faculty Senate held its 
third meeting on Monday 
Oct. 10, in the Enid Dennis 
Room of Hart Chapel. 

The Faculty Senate 
includes one faculty mem- 
ber from each department. 
Meetings are led by faculty 
senate chair Jamie Phillips, 
an associate professor of 
philosophy. Faculty senate 
discusses various issues and 
ideas throughout the uni- 
versity. 

Monday's meeting includ- 
ed updates in the position of 
the budget, and highlighted 
ways for each department to 
save money throughout the 
next year. Clarion 



University President Dr. 
Joe Grunenwald stated that 
there was "no change or 
worsening in the deficit" 
and that the "number was 
not as bad as last year's 
deficit." The current deficit 
is $2.4 million, and is exact- 
ly what was projected for 
this year's deficit. 

Many things are looked at 
when the university is look- 
ing to save or come up with 
more money For example, 
retiree's final salary is high- 
er than first year faculty 
being hired to replace those 
retirees, which yields money 
to help the deficit. 

Another item discussed at 
the meeting was enrollment. 
October and November are 
important months in 
recruitment, and it is "the 
time to take steps to get stu- 
dents," said Gruenwald. 

"If every department 
brought in three new stu- 



dents for next year, it would 
equal 100 new students and 
an additional $1 million to 
the university," said 
Grunenwald. 

The faculty senate also 



If every department 
brought in three new 
students for next year, 
it would equal 100 
new students and an 
additional $1 million 
to the university. 

- Dr. Grunenwald 



reports on the progress vari- 
ous campus oriented organi- 
zations and other areas 
including student senate, 
academic standards, stu- 
dent affairs, institutional 
resources and admissions. 



Progress on the Venango 
campus is also discussed. 

The reports on the various 
campus organizations 

included news of new 
Chairpersons that were 
elected. Jonathan Brown 
was elected chair of the 
Academic Standards and 
Admissions, Jon Touster 
was elected chair of the sub- 
committee of student activi- 
ties, which is part of student 
Affairs and Jeffrey 

Wardlaw was elected the 
Institutional Resources 
chair. 

Goals of the Venango cam- 
pus include establishing an 
honors and mentoring pro- 
gram, and working on reten- 
tion efforts. 

The Oct. 10 meeting was 
the third of six meetings 
that will be held through 
fall 2005. Faculty senate 
consists of 24 members. 



Hafer kicks off "Women and Work" 



John Santa 
News Editor 

sJmsanta@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Oct 12 - Clarion 
University's Presidential 
Commission on the Status of 
Women (PCOSW) will kick 
off its annual project 
"Women and Work" with a 
presentation by Barbara 
Hafer, the former 

Pennsylvania state treasur-. 
er, on Oct. 26 at 3 p.m. on 
Level A of ,the Carlson 
Library. 

According to Dr. Kevan M. 
Yenerall, an associate pro- 
fessor of political science 
who also is the chair of the 
"Women and Work" commis- 
sion, PCOSW is one of a 
group of presidential com- 
missions on campus that are 
made up of faculty who will 



make presentations 

throughout the entire aca- 
demic year on topics rang- 
ing from empowerment 
strategies in the workplace, 
"under the radar" discrimi- 
nation and Wal-Mart. 

Hafer's speech entitled, 
"Women, Politics and Public 
Service," will focus on her 
career and life as a politi- 
cian, political activist, nurse 
and woman. "We want to 
..have programs and speak- 
ers that speak to women in 
the workplace. Having a 
career in nursing and as a 
mother, she brings a unique 
perspective," said Yenerall. 

In her tenure in the realm 
of Pennsylvania politics, 
Hafer has had experience. 
She served and worked as 
auditor general, the first 
woman elected to the 



Allegheny County Board of 
Commissioners and, in 
1990, Hafer ran as a repub- 
lican gubernatorial candi- 
date. 

Hafer also has worked in 
the private sector cs a nurse 




Barbara Hafer 

and her business, Hafer and 
Associates, advises govern- 
ments and private compa- 
nies on how to improve rev- 
enue. 

According to Yenerall, 



Hafer was recruited to 
speak at Clarion University 
after the two met over the 
summer. 

"Pennsylvania ranks very 
low in terms of women's par- 
ticipation in politics! here is 
someone that, against the 
odds, has been able to do 
such a good job. That really 
speaks to her as a leader 
and a person. She will have 
a lot to share given 
-fjenus^lvania's pretty 

abysmal record, it's really 
pretty amazing," said 
Yenerall. 

Hafer's "Women and 
Work" presentation, which 
is open to the general public, 
,will also include a question 
and answers section and 
will be concluded with a 
reception sponsored by the 
Clarion Young Democrats. 



Kentucky museum fuels creationist debate 



IVIichael Powell 

Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 



PETERSBURG, Kentucky, 
Sept. 25 - The guide, a soft- 
spoken fellow with a schol- 
arly aspect, walks through 
the halls of this handsome, 
half-finished museum and 
points to the sculpture of a 
young velociraptor. 

"We're placing this one in 
the hall that explains the 
post-flood world," explains 
the guide. "When dinosaurs 
lived with man." 

A reporter has a question 
or two about this dinosaur- 



man business, but Mark 
Looy, the guide and a vice 
president at the museum 
already has walked over to 
the lifelike head of a T. rex, 
with its three inch teeth and 
carnivore's grin. 

"We call him our 'mission- 
ary lizard,"' Looy says. 
"When people realize the T. 
rex lived in Eden, it will 
lead us to a discussion of the 
gospel. The T. rex once was 
a vegetarian, too." 

The nation's largest muse- 
um devoted to the alterna- 
tive reality that is biblical 
creation science is rising 
just outside Cincinnati. 




Daniel J. Lewis/Answers In Genesis 
CREATION - "This is a battle cry to recognize the science in 
the revealed truth of God," said Kenneth Ham, who raised 
funds for the Creation Museum in Petersburg, Ky The muse- 
um, opening in 2007, offers a Biblical portrayal of creation. 




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Page 4 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



October 13. 2005 



t/IMiil 



October 13. 2005 



Tffi CLARION CALL 



Page 5 



THE CLARION CALL 

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Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

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Tom IVIclVleekin, 
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Dan Edington, 
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Copy & Design Editor 



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ill) .It 

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i.s free: additional copies are $1.00. 

■ Opinions expressed in this publica- 
tion are those of the writer or speaker, 
and do not necessarily reflect the opin- 
ions of the newspaper staff, student 
body, Clarion University or the com- 
munity. 



Wanted: 

Artists and Cartoonists 

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e-mail: call@clarion.edu or call: 393-2380 



Don't take family life for granted 



Ashley E. Angle 
Features Editor 

s_aeangle@clarion.edu 



College is a time to move away 
from home and get a taste of 
what "real life" and the "real 
world" is like. Students are 
removed from the friends they 
grew up with and removed 
from the comfort of their own 
home and family. For many, 
they've lived with family for 18 
years and often the transition 
to college is a challenge. As it 
becomes easier to live away 
from home, does that mean 
family becomes less important? 
Does it mean that they are 
taken for granted? 

It became easy for me to be 
away from my family second 
semester freshman year. Now 
as a senior, I no longer go home 
for Thanksgiving and dread 
staying at home the whole four 
weeks for Christmas break. I 
miss my apartment, my stuff, 
my rules and my life. 

I never really thought much 
about my attitude towards my 
family or my attitude towards 
going home until I had a dream 
one night this semester. 

I was in the Call office. It 
must have been a Wednesday 
night because the office was 
crowded and people were run- 
ning around every which way. 
For some reason, we had a TV 
and it was turned to some news 
station. Panic set in as I 
watched the weather maps of a 
huge hurricane tumbling to 
Eastern Pennsylvania, where I 
grew up and where my family 
still is. In a state of shock I ran 




Photo courtesy of Ashley E. Angle 

FAMILY - Ashley (center) 
and her siblings Brett and 
Courtney in 1987. 

to our dark room for privacy, 
grabbed my cell phone and 
started to dial. My brain and 
my hands weren't connecting. 
I'd dial the area code over and 
over, but could never get the 
other seven digits right. In mid- 
dial I got an incoming call from 
my little sister, who at 18, and 
by the world's standards, isn't 
little anymore. 

"Ashley! I can't find Dad!" she 
yelled through the phone. "I 
can't find Dad!" 

"Courtney!" I yelled back. 
"You have co find him!" 

I could hear the pounding of 
rain on the other end. I heard 
the panic not only in my voice, 
but also in hers. 

"Brett's here!" she said in ref- 
erence to our older brother... 
and then the phone went dead. 
i The only thing I could think to 
do was try to keep reaching my 
dad, but once again my brain 
and my fingers wouldn't work 



together. What would I do 
anyway? I was four hours from 
home and safely tucked away 
in Clarion, Would I ever see or 
talk to my family again? Would 
our house and town be 
destroyed? 

When I opened my eyes I was 
safe and sound in my bed in my 
apartment, cuddled up to my 
favorite stuffed animal. It was 
just a dream, but why was I 
shaking and scared? But really, 
maybe most importantly, why 
did I have an overwhelming 
feeling of guilt? 

The dream really made me 
think about who my family is 
and what they mean to me. I 
ended up being up for hours 
afterwards. I thought about if I 
could never see them again. 
How would my life be different? 
As college students , we are 
often too wrappe dup in our 
own worlds to remember the 
truly important things in life! 
the people who know every- 
thing about us and still love us 
despite of it.,, our families. 

Regardless of how near or far 
our families are we often take 
them for granted. We're too 
busy worrying about our school 
work, our jobs, our friends and 
our lives. Family becomes this 
distant thing that you think 
will just be there when you 
need them. But what if they 
aren't one day? The victims of 
Hurricane Katrina and other 
tragedies probably never 
thought they'd wake up one day 
and have family members miss- 
ing or dead. They were proba- 
bly just like us... "today I don't 
have to call home, and today I 
don't have to care because 



they'll be there tomorrow," 

Granted, my parents are 
divorced and remarried, and 
my new family members each 
have a special place in my 
heart, but I couldn't imagine 
being without my dad, my 
brother and my sister... my 
core family group. On average, 
how often do I talk to them? 
Once a week, if that. Do I take 
them for granted? You bet. 
Why are we so selfish? 
Probably more than half of us 
wouldn't be living our wonder- 
ful lives removed from our fam- 
ilies without the help of at least 
one of those family members. 
I'll admit it; my dad helps me 
out a lot. He's been my finan- 
cial and emotional stronghold 
for as long as I can remember. 
Who in your life plays that 
role? Is it really okay that just 
because we don't live at home 
anymore that we can stop 
appreciating that help? I'd go 
with no. How does it make our 
family feel when we forget 
about how much we really need 
them? 

Calling home more often, 
remembering the good things 
about each family member and 
loving them for who they are, 
not only for what they do for us, 
are all things we can do to help 
improve relations with family. 

My dream was my wake up 
call. What will be yours? Would 
it take a tragedy to see the 
importance of family? I don't 
want to wake up one day and 
realize I took my family for 
granted and treated spending 
time with them as just another 
thing on my to-do list, and have 
it be too late. Do you? 




Paul Anderson 
Circulation Manager 

s_pmanderson@clarion.eciu 

I've decided that I'm des'"' 
tined to rule the world. Not 
rule the world in the way 
the President rules the 
world (leader of the free 
world and all that feel-good 
crap that we Americans 
cheerfully swallow as if it 
were true), but rule the 
world in the sense that all 
living creatures, from your 
mom to the squirrel in the 
tree in your front yard, will 
one day bow down to me. 
Just think of the honor it is 
for you then! You are one of 
the lucky people who knew 
me before my greatness! 

And, anyway, shouldn't 
you be bowing or something, 
right now? Fetch me my 
jester, I must be amused. 

Because of this decision, 
I've been thinking of where 
to start. See, I'm a teacher, 
which isn't too bad. 
Teachers indoctrinate kids 
to think in certain ways 
and, in a given academic 
year, teachers get 150 disci- 
ples to mold. You would 
think that running for polit- 
ical office or being a cop 
would work, but that's not 
entirely true. Cops only 




uphold the laws that the 
real leaders create. 
Politicians are only looking 
for ways to expand their 
checking accounts during 
the campaign season (why. 
thank you for the donation — 
I'll repeal that pesky law 
that keeps you from making 
bioweaponry right away). 

Anyway, so teaching is the 
way to go. Do it mathemati- 
cally. I'm 22 now. I'll be 23 
when I teach for my first 
year. One hundred and fifty 
kids that first year. To run 
for the biggest office in the 
land, the Presidency, you 
must be 36. That's 13 years. 
13 times 150 is 1950. But 
I'm not the only teacher, you 
see. In my one discipline, 
English, there are 19 others. 
That's 37,050. And that's 
only in my discipline. In the 
others (I list five, although 
there are probably more^ 
English, Social Studies, 
Math, Science and 

Elementary), we break the 
100,000 mark easily. 

However, you must realize 



The 
Dumping 

Ground 

that I never said this was 
going to be a quick process. 

And who says English peo- 
ple can't do Math to save 
their Hves? Oh, yeah, that's 
right. I did. Whoops. 

I've come to this decision 
to justify the reasons why I 
will be a teacher. Is it just to 
teach "To Kill a 
Mockingbird" for the rest of 
my existence on this planet? 
Pardon me while I jump off 
a bridge. 

So, it must be to rule the 
world! That's the only justi- 
fication I can think of, any- 
way. Besides, it was either 
this or start my own religion 
and to do that, you gotta rec- 
ognize that there is a power 
above you, even if you 
decide that power is only a 
table lamp. 

Whether it be Jesus, Shiva 
or a Mr. Coffee machine, 
starting a religion to rule 
the world is kinda self- 
defeating when you stop to 
think about it. 

Now, I'm sure there are 
some people wondering how 



I'm going to convince all the 
other teachers in the field to 
indoctrinate kids so that, 
when they grow up, they 
will recognize me as their 
Benevolent Leader. That's 
simple. I'll promise them 
placement on my World 
Council of Advisors. Or have 
O'Brien drag their dissent- 
ing asses down to Room 101. 

(Oh, go look it up. I origi- 
nally had a double-enten- 
dre joke that used both his- 
tory and sex, but it got edit- 
ed out. So, I used English, 
instead. Pity.) 

I mean, I do enjoy teach- 
ing, I wouldn't have put up 
with four years of theory- 
without-application if I did- 
n't, but there's got to be 
more coming than just new 
textbooks. Maybe the light 
of enthusiasm from a child's 
eye when they understand a 
concept? I'm not that New 
Age-y. 

How about the idea that 
all my hard work will one 
day reward me with a 
throne made of gold and car- 
ried by joyful followers? 
Now we're talking. 

Or you could just save me 
a whole hell of a lot of trou- 
ble and recognize my place 
as Leader now. C'mon, I'll 
owe ya one. 



Maybe she's bom with it ... (but probabiy not) 




Ashley Boynes 
Advertising Designer 

s_amboynps@clarion.edu 

Makeup has its origins in 
ancicn? Egypt. Back then. 



they used makeup to pro- 
tect themselves from the 
harsh desert sand and dust. 
However, do not underesti- 
mate the power of beauty - 
it was also used to accentu- 
ate certain features. Many 
Greek and Roman cultures, 
as well as African and 
Native American tribes, 
also used makeup and cos- 
metics. Why? Mostly for 
decorative and beauty- 
refining purposes, much 
like today. The question in 
my mind that reigns 
supreme is, why do women 
today feel subjected to 
wearing makeup? 
Don't get me wrong. I love 



playing around with styles 
of makeup and different 
looks just as much as the 
next girl. And, although I 
will go out in public with a 
(gasp!) makeup-free face. I 
do admit to feeling a bit 
self-conscious when doing 
so. Why do I feel this way? 
Is the natural me that 
appalling that my naked 
face cannot be seen on cam- 
pus or around town? Not at 
all. It's just that we, as 
women, are somehow 
taught to throw a little 
makeup on. or be judged. 
Why can't it be like the era 
of the French Revolution, 
when makeup virtually dis- 



appeared off the face of the 
earth? Then, I could wash 
my face and not worry 
about my eyeliner smudg- 
ing, my mascara irritating 
my contacts, or the fear of 
having lipstick on my 
pearly whites. 

Granted, almost everyone 
looks better with a little 
makeup, even people who 
are astonishingly naturally 
beautiful. 

The main purpose of cos- 
metics is to enhance fea- 
tures that are already 
there. 

The sad thing is that 
many women compare 
themselves to other girls 



who may not be that much 
more attractive than them, 
but just have the extra time 
and money to spend on 
primping. I, for one, value 
an extra 15 minutes sleep 
much more than the appli- 
cation of makeup. It's not 
that I do not care about my 
appearance, I just know 
when to spend time on my 
makeup and when not to. 

I knew a girl, maybe two, 
who literally spent almost 
45 minutes to an hour just 
applying makeup. Is our 
time that worthless, and 
society so enamored with 
beauty that we waste a 
large portion of our day 



primping.' 

Ladies, I'd love to have a 
National Makeup Free Day. 
Wouldn't that be liberat- 
ing? Sure, we might scare 
some folks away, but would- 
n't it be nice to not have to 
apply your makeup while 
you are driving because you 
know you will (God forbid!) 
"look like crap" if you don't? 
A nice ideal, but its not 
going to happen, because 
too many women need their 
makeup like they need oxy- 
gen. Hmm... maybe I'll get a 
job with M.A.C. or Revlon 
... the cosmetics industry is 
going to be long thriving, 
from the looks of things. 



? 



Feitms 



Mosaic Creation 



UAB craft series continues 



A^^DOcroumQii'M 



Jeff Donston 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 



There are only a few 
things that people do on 
Monday nights. Either they 
watch the football game or 
study. Some may do 
absolutely nothing. The 
University Activities Board 
craft series was created to 
give students an alterna- 
tive. The craft series has 
run every other Monday for 
the past five weeks. On 
Monday, Oct. 10, they met 
once again in 248 Gemmell 
for Mosaic Creations. 

The craft series is spon- 
sored by the UAB and run 
by Art Chairperson Esteban 
Brown. 

Brown said the craft series 
is for "students to come 
together and meet new peo- 
ple and make crafts." 

They created mosaics this 
week to, "try something 
new" Brown said. 

About 10 students sat 
around the tables and cut 
out different shapes from an 




Morris Ptatt/Th^ Clarion Call 

MOSAIC CREATION - Students created mosaics on Oct. 10 as 
part of UAB's craft series which is held every other Monday 
night. 



assortment of colored foam 
and pasted them into artis- 
tic designs. 

Maria DeCecco, a junior 
attending the Mosaic 
Creation, said crafts are 
"something I have always 



liked doing since I was a 
child as a hobby. It's harder 
to do in college, I'o it's nice to 
have a place to go and do 
crafts." 

Mosaic art is the use of 
laying small pieces of differ- 



ent colored materials 
together to form pictures 
and patterns. Mosaics can 
be made from just about 
anything. For example, the 
mosaic art website thejoyof- 
shard8.co,uk shows mosaics 
made from stones, metal, 
pieces of glass, plastic and 
even sea shells. At Mosaic 
Creations thin pieces of 
foam were used. 

"I tried to get glass but 
couldn't find it," said Brown. 
Freshmen Doug 

Mawhinney and Carole 
Vogel also attended Mosaic 
Creations on Monday night. 
Mawhinney said he had, 
"done a lot of crafts in vaca- 
tion bible school," at his 
church in his hometown of 
Neshannock, Pa. 

Mawhinney said he came 
because he was "procrasti- 
nating over homework." 

Vogel came to the jewelry 
making night of the craft 
series two weeks earlier. 

She said, " I had fun at the 
jewelry show, so I have tried 
to come to every one. It's 
something fun to do." 



Dear Dr. Eagle, 

As many people know. October is National Breast 
Cancer Awareness month. A friend of mine lost a relative 
to breast cancer last year. I was wondering if you had any 
facts about breast cancer that could help people become 
more aware of it. 
Signed, 

More Aware 






What does it mean to be Greek? 




Josh Pierce 
and Amanda Goe 
Clarion Call Staff Writers 

Quite frequently students 
can be heard asking ques- 
tions, plenty of questions. 
There are questions asked 
in classes, students ask 
questions about the dorms, 
or about scheduling. It is 
rare to hear a student ask 
another "What does it mean 
to be Greek?" 

Being Greek is more than 
just partying or hanging out 
at the chapter house. Being 
Greek is a lifelong commit- 
ment. It is a responsibility 



to one's organization, the 
national organization, to 
one's brothers and sisters, to 
the community and to the 
University as a whole. 
Fraternity and sorority men 
and women are expected to 
uphold the name of their 
group as well as the Greek 
community as a unit. 

The Greeks of Clarion 
University are required to 
maintain a minimum 2.8 
grade point average as an 
organization and a mini- 
mum 2,5 grade point aver- 
age as individuals. 

Just as there are similari- 
ties between the groups 
there are plenty of differ- 
ences; such as the letter the 
group wears, the national 
symbols, or even the colors 
of the group. However, there 
is one major thing that it 
shares. The Greek organiza- 
tion shares its ritual and its 
importance to the fraternity 
or sorority. Sure, each one is 
practiced differently, but all 



groups have them and each 
one is of equal importance. 

Rituals are what connect 
the local chapters of broth- 
ers and sisters to the other 
chapters all across the 
nation and even the world. 
It is what unites each as 
brothers or sisters and is the 
commonality that each 
member has to another It is 
a sacred bond that is 
entered upon joining a 
Greek letter organization. 

Initiation is just the first 
phase of Greek life. At each 
stage of a member's life, 
there are certain expecta- 
tions that are to be met. 
Undergraduates do have a 
lot of responsibility when 
associated with being 
Greek, but there is more 
that a member is expected 
to do even after graduation. 
Alumni are asked to help 
maintain their chapter by 
being a support system for 
undergraduate members. 
Connections are to be made 



through a network of alum- 
ni all over the country. Just 
because graduation comes 
and goes does not mean that 
the letters disappear Once 
initiation is performed, each 
member is considered a 
member for life. 

These are some of the 
easy-to-explain expectations 
of Greeks. It is a way of life. 
Once the decision to become 
Greek is made, it changes 
the individual for the rest of 
their lifetime. Most groups 
have a promise that sounds 
similar to this phrase "to 
better the individuals 
through leadership, respon- 
sibility, and determination." 
Of course each is different, 
but the goal will always be 
the same. Being Greek is a 
brotherhood or a sisterhood. 
It is a family to be there for- 
ever. Being Greek is loyalty, 
devotion, family and prom- 
ise. 



Dear More Aware, 
Breast cancer usually begins in the lining of the ducts 

and is called ductal carcinoma. Cells keep dividing when 

they don't need to be, and the extra cells form a mass of 

tissue called a tumor. A tumor can be either benign (not 

cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). 
This year 182,000 women will be diagnosed with breast 

cancer and approximately 43,300 women will die from it. 

Any woman can be at risk for breast cancer. Moat women 

who get breast cancer have no family history of it. Age 

increases the risk of getting breast cancer. 2() percent of 

women diagnosed are under the age of 50. Tlie greatest 

risk factor is being a woman. 
Racial and ethnic background can also increase the risk 

of breast cancer. It is the 
leading cause of death among 
African-American women 
ages 30 to 54. Caucasian, 
African American and 
Hawaiian women have the 
highest levels of breast can- 
cer. 

Every month after their- 
monthly, cycle women should 
perform a self-examination. 
Watch for any changes in the 
area. Females between the 
ages of 20 to 39 should 
receive clinical breast exami- 
nations every three years. 
Women over the age of 40 
should get a mammogram 
done every 1 to 2 years. 

Signs of breast cancer are: 
■Lump or thickening in or 
near the breast or in the 
underarm area 

■A change in the size or shape of the breast 

■Nipple discharge or tenderness 

■Ridges or pitting of the breast 

■A change in the way the skin of the breast or nipple feels 

and looks. 
The common treatments for breast cancer are surgerji; i 

radiation, chemotherapy and^r hormone therapy 

If you notice any changes in your breast or underarm 

call your doctor immediately. Early detection is the key to 

surviving breast cancer. 

Men should also be checking their breasts. Although 

rare, men can develop breast cancer. 

Sotirce: The Breast Cancer Site, Frequently Askedi 
Questions and Answers, www.thebreastcancer8ite.com 

Doctor Eagle is written by Sarah Wilson of The Keeling 
Health Center. For more information or to suggest a 
topic, please contact her at s_smmlson@clarion.edu 




Kurt Boyd 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 



As winter is approaching, 
many different changes 
start to take place at 
Clarion University. The 
leaves start to take on dif- 
ferent colors, the air 
becomes cooler, and football 
season is upon us. The 
beautiful change of seasons 
is one of the main reasons 
that Ryan Waterman, 
sophomore English major, 
decided to continue her sec- 
ondary education in 
Clarion. 

Waterson is from 
Elverson, Pa. and attended 
Twin Valley High School, 
People may know this 19 
year old from the Open Mic 
Nights held monthly at 
Gemmell as well as Tobeco 
Open Mic Nights at 
Michelle's Cafe. 

Starting with piano les- 
sons whenever she was very 
young. Waterman did not 
pick up a guitar until she 
was 12. Her father, Paul, 
was an avid guitar player 
and inspired his daughter 
to express herself through 
music. After one month of 



lessons, she was able to sing 
along with her playing. The 
first song she learned to 
play and sing at the same 
time was Van Morrison's 
"Brown Eyed Girl." She 
only stuck with lessons for 
one year before deciding to 
explore the guitar on her 
own. 

At the age of 15, she start- 
ed to sing in bars with a 
local cover band called Vuja 
De. According to 

Waterman, she was the 
least nervous the very first 
time she performed on 
stage, 

"Getting applause felt like 
some kind of high," she 
described being on stage in 
front of a group of people. 

Influences in her music 
include The Beatles, Janis 
Joplin, Paul Simon, Bob 
Dylan and Bob Marley. 
Along with her original 
material, she performs 
songs by these artists. 

"They're kinda folky, real- 
ly simple," is how she 
describes the sound and 
lyrics of her songs. She said 
that the "Lyrics are poetic, 
I'm a poet." 

So how did this 
singer/songwriter find her 



way to Clarion? The 
answer to that, according to 
Waterman: Clarion found 
her. The first time she took 
the cross state trip on 
Interstate 80, she fell in 
love with the scenery. 
Waterman knew she would 
be an English major and 
felt that she could have 
gone anywhere so she 
looked at schools in 
Philadelphia and 

Massachusetts. The view 
from her sixth floor dorm 
room in Wilkinson Hall was 
enough to keep her 
attached to Clarion's west- 
ern Pennsylvania location. 
Describing herself as hav- 
ing a very outdoor personal- 
ity, this scene seemed to fall 
directly into place for her 

Although her passion is 
being a songwriter, she is 
also involved in Tobeco, 
Clarion University's liter- 
ary journal, and currently 
is treasurer of the 
Philosophy club. Currently, 
Waterman enjoys the type 
of music that is not very 
mainstream. She stated 
that one of her favorite 
artists of today is Kellar 
Williams because of his tal- 
ents and use of guitar She 




enjoys attending outdoor 
festivals such as the 
Grassroots Festival. She 
has the mentality that if 
people are not creating 
music for themselves, then 
what is the point. 

Currently, her future 
plans involving music are 
not evident. She is just con- 
centrating on getting her 
English degree, not know- 
ing what type of career that 
will hold for her She does 



not have any set plans for 
pursuing a career in music 
either; she is just going to 
keep playing for herself to 
see what happens. As long 
as people are willing to lis- 
ten, she will continue to 
perform in front of any 
number of people that will 
hear her. She currently 
resides in the University 
Apartments, practicing her 
craft as well as receiving 
her education. 



"Creative, quiet, intelli- 
gent," are the words she 
used when asked to 
describe herself in only 
three words. 

Students, faculty and 
community members will 
get a chance to hear 
Waterman's music at future 
open mic nights, as she 
plans to perform at as many 
as she can. 



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Page 6 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



October 13. 2005 




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Page 8 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



October 13. 2005 






Clario n University offers hatha yoga 



Grant Herrnberger 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

A 2.000-yearold ancient 
practice known as hatha 
yoga is still being practiced 
today. It is mainly practiced 
for health and vitality in the 
2l8t century. 

Clarion University offers 
hatha yoga classes in the 
wrestling room in Tippin 
Gymnasium on Wednesdays 
from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The 
class will continue through 
Nov. 30. 

Former Clarion yoga class 
member Sam Steele said, "I 
took the class because I 
needed the credit. I took the 
class in pre-session and felt 
that it was very relaxing." 

"I learned about many 
types of yoga. It's amazing 
how extensive these styles 
can be, but Dr. Leas was a 
good teacher so I learned a 
lot," said Steele. 
Dr. Jim Kole said, "At the 
end of each hatha yoga class 
we dedicate at least 15 min- 
utes to total relaxation. 
Instructors combine deep 
breathing with a tense-slow 



relax method that totally 
relaxes all of the muscles ot 
the body" 

Kole described the Clarion 
University class finale as a 
way the instructor de.scnbes 
a pleasant scenario, such as 
a tropical beach. The partic- 
ipants should feel the 
warmth of the sun. the 
smell of the sea, palm trees 
rustling and the gentle 
breeze of the ocean. 

"As you can imagine, there 
are few yoga students that 
want to end the relaxing 
guided imaginary part of 
the class," said Dr. Kole. 

Like many different exer- 
cises, there is a variety to 
what is practiced, whether 
it's weight lifting or martial 
arts. Yoga is no exception, 
hatha yoga is more common- 
ly known as the "forceful 
yoga." because it usually 
requires the most physical 
endurance of all types of 
yoga. Regular practice will 
help produce a more clear 
mind. 

Although the aim of yoga 
is spiritual perfection, it 
encourages a balanced, all 
around development of 



human potential. A yoga 
practitioner believes that 
people should use all 
resources given to him or 
her for effective spiritual 
growth. It's been said that 
starting yoga at a young age 
can reduce the risk of devel- 
oping cancer, diabetes, heart 
disease and other serious ill- 
nesses. 

Hatha yoga, is the most 
common yoga practiced in 
the United States. For a 
long time, there was only 
one style of hatha yoga 
called Iyengar. The diversity 
of yoga has expanded due to 
its increase in popularity. 

Hatha yoga originated in 
India and is one of the four 
main traditions of tantra 
yoga. Posture (asanas) and 
breathing (pranayama) are 
the key elements focused on 
in hatha yoga. 

Asanas may look to some 
more like painful attempts 
to turn oneself into a pret- 
zel, rather than a posture. 
One type of asanas that 
looked exceptionally diffi- 
cult to master was called 
shirsh-asana three. This 
posture constitutes a person 



perfectly vertical off the 
ground held only by the 
head and the arms in an "L" 
shape surrounding the 
head. This is a position that 
would not seem humanly 
possible. If the mind wan- 
ders to other thoughts, the 
person will fall out of the 
balancing posture and then 
must start over. 

The focus behind pranaya- 
ma is that if one can master 
breath, then the mastery of 
mind is within reach. 
Mastering the art of breath- 
ing can regulate vital ener- 
gy into the body. 

The word "hatha" is split 
into two parts. "Ha" means 
"sun" and "tha" means 
"moon." This stands for the 
fact that hatha yoga unites 
opposites, that being the 
sun and the moon. Hatha 
yoga can be for everyone 
from children to adults 
Although the intensity will 
vary, the outcome will make 
the body more physically 
and spiritually in sync. 

Starting with hatha yoga 
is necessary before starting 
a meditation practice, as it 
helps the person to practice 




Katie Builers, The Ckuion C^ll 



HATHA YOGA - Students participated in the hatha yoga class on 
Oct. 12 in Tippin Gymnasium. 



self discipline and concen- 
tration. A major result of 
hatha yoga is a more 
relaxed mind. Less stress is 
a result of minimizing what 
the mind is focusing on. 

Students and faculty are 
welcome to attend this 
Continuing Education class 



for the next session for free. 
If they enjoy the experience, 
they can contact the 
Continuing Education 

Department for prorated 
class rates. 



Family Health 
Council, Inc. 



1064A. Fast Main Street 

814-226-7500 
www. fhcinc.org 



'Students for Life' kicks off second year as RSO 



Provicfing birth coiitrolveinergency 

contraception and gyne services. 

Free STD testing & treatment. 

Most Insurance plans accepted. 

Sliding scale fees fortho.se without insurance. 

AH services are confidential. 



Amber White 

Assistant Features Editor 

Anyone who has seen the 
flyers around campus may 
think this new organization 
is specifically a pro-life 
group. In a sense, this is 
true. However, Students for 
Life deals with more than 
just the argument of abor- 
tion. 

Started just last year, 
Students for Life is a "pro- 
woman, pro-life organiza- 
tion based on the conviction 



that all human beings are 
created equal and endowed 
with fundamental rights, 
among which is the right to 
life without which no other 
right exists," according to 
President Melissa Johnson. 
Besides the topic of abor- 
tion, this group also deals 
with issues such as 
euthanasia and the death 
penalty Events affiliated 
with those topics included 
informational tables, a 
movie night on the subject of 
euthanasia and attending 
last year's presentation by a 



man who had been wrongly 
sentenced to death row. 

Students for Life has a 
strong belief in "the sanctity 
of human life from concep- 
tion" and helped to raise 
money for area pregnancy 
centers last year. 

Pro-life Congresswoman 
Mehssa Hart was also asked 
to speak on campus. 

Last month, they held a 
baby drive for a crisis preg- 
nancy center in Frenchville 
and set up a pro-life table. 
Their biggest event last year 
was attending the March for 



Life in Washington, D.C., 
and they would like to be 
able to attend it again this 
year. 

Plans for the upcoming 
year include involvement 
with Operation Clarion 
Cares, getting a speaker on 
campus, and developing "a 
pro-life culture on Clarion's 
campus through education." 
All students are welcome to 
join this group, which meets 
every other Thursday at 5 
p.m in 114 Founders Hall. 




Registration begins Monday, October 17 



For the first time, Clanon University is ofTering a winter intersession between the tall and spring semesters. All courses olTered in the 
session will be delivered on-line. Students do not need to be on campus to take a class. It is expected there will be a variety of 
cmirses offered but the exact list of courses will not be available for a few weeks. This is a separate term like the summer pre-session 
1 here is a separate tuition charge but no additional financial aid will be available. Students are only permitted to take one class 
Classes begin Monday, December 19, after the last day of the fall semester examinations and run until January 9 2006 





inter Intersession offerings 



Because most of the university will be closed for part of this session, no 
on-eampus library or student services will be provided. Office services (registrar, 
bursar, financial aid. computing services, etc.) will be limited and not avaiFable for 
one week in the middle of the term. C^redit/No Record will not be available during 
this term. Drop/Add period is December 20-22. 

Students from other universities and institutions interested in faking a winter 
intersession course should contact the Admissions office at 814-393-2.^06 or 
e-mail at http://www.clarion.edu/admi.ss/ and click on 

http://www.clarion.edu/registrar/pdfs/WinterIntersessionforni.pdf 

to fill out a "Quick Admit" form. 

Graduate applicants CANNOT use the quick admit form. Click on 
www.clarion.edu/graduatestudies/applv.slUmI for more information. 

It you have any questions concerning winter intersession. contact Lynne Fleisher 
at 814-393-2778 or ineistier@clarion.edu. 

NO IK: Fall 2005 grading will not be completed until 12/22/05. Students seeking 
informatiim on grade status before 12/22/05 should cont»it their instrnclor directly. 



( l.iriiiM |lni\i-iMt_v IS ,111 .ifiiiiii.iinf jil i-ijiiul iippiMluiiilv tiii|ilii\ci. 



Class 

AEIOO 

AE260 

COMM 441 

Esni 

ED 620 
HPE 1 n 
LS501 
LS532 
LS577 
PSY 1 n 
PSY211 
REHB581 



Description 

College Reading Study Skills 
Career Exploration & Planning 

Advanced Media Writing 

Basic Earth Science 

Internet Applications K-12 Educators 

Healtln Education 

Developing Library Collections 

IVlgnnt. of School Library Media Centers 

Libraries, Literature, and the Child 

Psychology of Personal Growth 

Introduction to Psychology 

Rehabilitation of those living with HIV/AIDS 



Instructor 

Staff 
Staff 

Lingwall 

Vega 

McCullough 

English 

Harhai 

Staff 

Harhai 

Hoynes 

Vilberg 

Kilwein 



Courses highlighted in gray are pending CCPS Approval. 



October 13. 2005 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 



S I NCI I « t 7 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



litertiiueit 

Open Mic Night shows off talent 



Page 9 





Kim Cammuso 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Oct. 11 - The 
University Activities Board 
(UAB) sponsored its second 
Open Mic Night of the year 
at 8 p.m. on Oct. 11 in 
Gemmell Ritazza. 

Matthew Petrowsky, fresh- 
man geology/environmental 



gco.scicnce major, and Ben 
Watkins, fre.shman physics 
major, said, "We came 
straight from baseball prac- 
tice just to see a few guys 
from our dorm perform 
tonight." Petrowsky added, 
"I also really like music and 
Ben plays the guitar too, so 
we thought it would be cool 
to comp see what it was 
like." 

Before the program began, 
all the performers sat 
around in their own little 
areas getting their last bit of 
practice in by singing and 
tuning instruments. By the 
time it reached 8 p.m., peo- 
ple rushed around to find 
seats and wished their peers 




Lisa Sagan/TAe Clarion Call 
OPEN MIC NIGHT -Ben Smith performs at Tobeco's Open Mic 
Night on Sept. 19. 



luck before they took the 
stage. 

There were about 12 total 
performers that came to 
Open Mic Night to show 
their "stuff off. 

By the time the second act 
took the stage, almost every 
person who walked past, 
stopped to watch the show, 
even some for a few min- 
utes. It is without question 
that people became particu- 
larly enthusiastic when trio 
Gorav "G" Gulati, Justin 
Jones and Ryan Waterman 
performed John Denver's 
"Leaving on a Jet Plane." 

Gulati appeared calm and 
confident in front of the 
crowd. Maybe it was 
because he displayed such 
outstanding abihty with his 
guitar playing and vocals. 

Waterman's voice, which 
reminded me of Janis 
Joplin, added an interesting 
feel to this song. 

Following that perform- 
ance, while accompanied by 
Jones's harmonica skills, 
Gulati played his guitar and 
sang the classic Bob Dylan 
song "Knocking on Heaven's 
Door." 

Jones, sophomore second- 
ary education social studies 
major, said, "I really started 
getting interested in music 
while I was in high school. I 
pretty much taught myself 



how to play everything sinct- 
I only took about two guitar 
lessons in my whole life. 1 
usually start off being a lit- 
tle nervous when I am per- 
forming', l)ut I think I'm get- 
ting used to being in front of 
crowds. It's also cool per- 
forming at these because 
they're not just like full 
blown shows. I've been in 
three bands, but now I'm 
just trying to do my own 
thing." 

Another performer who 
stood out that night was 
Ben Smith, whose perform- 
ance included songs by John 
Mayer, Billy Idol and Sister 
Hazel. 

Dan Williams lit up the 
crowd when he performed 
"Collide" by Howie Day. 
Erin Schaffer, junior com- 
munication sciences and 
disorders major, said, "I 
came to see my friend Dan 
Wilhams melt the girls' 
hearts!" Williams definitely 
appeared to hold many of 
the girls' attention in the 
audience. 

Clarion's second Open Mic 
Night of the year was a suc- 
cessful one. It was uplifting 
to see how much support 
these young musicians have 
among their friends and 
classmates. There was an 
even better turnout than 
last month's event. 



Caruso's 'Two for the Money/ 
maybe worth matinee price 




Nathan Stahlman 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



"Two for the Money" 
Director: D.J. Caruso 
Universal Pictures 
rating:3/5 W'^ ^ 



For Brandon Lang 
(Matthew McConaughey), 
sports are life. Growing up. 
being an athlete was all he 
knew. He was even a star 
quarterback in college, 
ready to go pro until an 
injury in the national cham- 
pionship game put him on 
the sidelines forever. Now 
he works a dead end job in 
Las Vegas making record- 
ings for 1-900 hotlines. 
Brian has a gift, though. He 
knows college football better 
than anyone and is able to 
pick winners with incredible 
consistency In the betting 
capital of the world, the 
ability to pick winners 
should be priceless, but it 
takes a man in New York to 
put a dollar figure beside 
the job description. 

Walter Abrams (Al Pacino) 
runs a sports betting assis- 
tance agency out of New 
York. It's a completely legal 



operation, and gamblers 
from all over the world call 
his hotlines for advice on 
whom to pick in the big 
games. When he discovers 
Lang has been picking win- 
ners at over 80 percent accu- 
racy, he decides to build his 
empire around him. There's 
only one problem. Lang is on 
a hot streak and every hot 
streak eventually runs cold. 
When Lang's advisees start 
losing large quantities of 
cash on his poor picks they 
get a little upset, to say the 
least. Walter, having defined 
his business around Lang 
has no choice but to ride it 
into the ground with him 
hoping to reignite his hot 
streak. 

This film was actually 
quite entertaining despite 
its lack of depth. The movie 
really just scratched the 
surface of the gambhng 
business. It had undertones 
of being a story about people 
with screwed up childhoods. 
I think that was meant to 
play through, but it didn't 
really work out that well. 
Then again, how in depth of 
a movie can you expect from 
the writer of "Freejack?" 
That movie had Mick Jagger 
in it. Anyway, at least this 
one had Matthew 

McConaughey and Al 
Pacino. 

McConaughey and Pacino 
were both pretty good in 
this movie. There's just 
something about 

McConaughey's country boy 



Photo courtesy of image.net/Eike Schroter 

Two for the Money' - "The Sports Advisors," gambling impresa- 
rio Walter Abrams (AL PACINO) and ex-football star Brandon 
Lang (MAUHEW McCONAUGHEY) make their predictions on 
Abraham's weekly television show in the high-stakes drama "Two 
For the IVIoney." 



type character that I always 
like. He's innocent but also 
pretty smooth, or at least he 
thinks so (a lot like me 
minus the innocent part). 
Pacino, though he does go 
into a few shouting 
episodes, doesn't bring it 
quite like he usually does. 
We only get a glimpse into 
how crazy Pacino can really 
be. To make up for the lack 
of craziness, he surprised 
me with quite a few little 
one-line funnies. I actually 
found myself laughing more 
than I thought I should have 
been. I hke when you can 
laugh at a seemingly serious 
movie. 

Then just for giggles, they 
threw in Rene Russo whose 
acting is a httle rusty hav- 
ing not done anything in 



three years and anything 
good in about six. Though 
her skills have gone down a 
peg or two along with her 
looks, she's still fairly 
attractive. Throw her in 
with McConaughey and 
Pacino and you have your- 
self a pretty decent little 
cast, at least one that will 
put "Freejack's" to shame. 

In all. this movie is pretty 
good. It was actually better 
than I expected it to be. I'm 
not, however, recommend- 
ing you spend the money to 
see it in a theater. After it 
comes out on DVD you 
might want to rent it some 
night when you want to be 
mildly entertained and can 
ignore the weak, wannabe- 
deep screenplay. 



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Kitchen Confidentiar 

Most of the faces on Fox's "Kitchen Contidential" 
should be familiar to TV fanatics: Bradley Cooper 
("Alias"). Nicholas Brendan ("Buffy the Vampire 
Slayer"), John Francis Daley ("Freaks and Geeks ") and 
Bonnie Somerville ("The O.C"). What is unfamiliar is 
to see a show on Fox that the network actually gives an 
intelhgent show chance to succeed, as it has done by 
.-scheduling it after the cult favorite "Arrested 
Development." The shows are a good match because of 
their style of humor. 

The series is based on a book of the same title by chef 
Anthony B<>urdain. Cooper (as Bourdain) is the recent- 
ly reformed party boy who as head chef must now guide 
a sometimes criminal, sometimes foolish and almost 
always entertaining back-of-the-house staff. 

On the Oct. 3 episode, guest star John Larroquette 
(as Bourdain's mentor) provided an intriguing storyline 
that ponders if it is better to live a short, wild life or 
sacrifice the "finer" things in life to live longer. 
Larroquette's character decides to eat himself to death, 
on the rich, indulgent cooking of his best student, 
instead of following doctors' advice after multiple heart 
surgeries. 

TOM MCMEEKIN 

Homestarrunner.com 

Homestarrunner.com is a brilliant site in that pro- 
vides entertaining and hilarious flash animations with- 
out being overly violent or vulgar. Anyone who hasn't 
come across this site should definitely make an effort to 
next time they're bored in their dorm or apartment to 
see what all the fuss is about. 

^ For those who are new to the site, first check out the 
"Characters" section to find out the basics behind the 
different characters. Then watch an animation or two 
from the Toon section; "A Job Well Done" and "Bug in 
Mouth Disease" are two good ones to start with. 

After getting a feel for how the characters act, every- 
one should make their way to the "Strong Bad E-mail" 
section, probably the most popular part of the site. Just 
about every Monday, the proud character Strong Bad 
answers e-mail from fans of the site in hilarious fash- 
ion. After seeing the likes of "Dragon," "Trevor the 
Vampii-e." "Crying," and "Invisibility," even the biggest 
doubters will be hooked. 

JON GOFER 



Jeannette Good 
Copy & Design Editor 



good & nandom 

Before college, I was more into local music and the 
scene, specifically punk or emo. At those types of 
shows, it's fine to do your own thing; in fact, it's cool. 
Since entering college and becoming a music major 
about five years ago, my music scene turned into the 
performance music scene. What was punk is now clas- 
sical, and emo is now contemporary, for me. I'm not 
saying that I can't still appreciate a well-written, 
angst-ridden tune. In this music scene, however, things 
work a httle bit differently There are guidelines that 
should be followed when attending performances such 

as senior recitals, orches- 

NotGS of ^^^ concerts. Wind 

Ensemble concerts, Brass 
recital ettiqUette EnsemWe concerts, piano 

recitals, music fraternity 
recitals and any formal 
productions. 

Audience members at 
such events should listen, 
as attentively as possible, and pay attention to the per- 
former(s). I'll admit to not always being the most atten- 
tive or absorbed. However, keep the following in mind. 
Don't talk while someone is playing. It's rude. Plus, 
you. as an audience member, are there to hsten. To take 
it further, you could analyze what you hear and relate 
it to something you may have previously heard. 

Don't play with cell phones. In fact, make sure your 
cell phone is turned off I think this bothers me the 
most. It's extremely hard to pay attention when you are 
trying to read the text message someone two rows up is 
sending to their buddy Plus, do you really want some- 
one two rows back reading that? We're in a time when 
theater productions often begin with someone coming 
out to tell you to remember to turn off your cell phone 
and beeper and all electronic devices. 

Don't sleep while people are playing. This should be 
common sense. 

If you're late, don't come in during a piece. Wait until 
the performer finished that piece and you hear 
applause to enter, and be sure to enter as quietly as 
possible. I know you are probably anxious to enter, but 
the doors are loud and distract the performer(s) and 
other audience members. Listen from outside the 
doors. 

Don't leave in the middle of a piece. Wait until it is 
finished and people are applauding. Yes, there are 
some extenuating circumstances when you should just 
leave anyway If you are choking and cannot wait, then 
quietly leave. 

My point is I would love to see more people attending 
these performance events. I would more like to see 
those who attend remember to respect the performers 
and other audience members. 



Page 10 



TTO CLARION CALL 



October 13. 2005 



mmilieis 



Creek Us, Travel Einplojineiil, For Renl, Personals, and fieneral Ms 



6REEKS 



Congrat.s Sister of the Week 

Jessica Baypf! 

-Love, Your AZ Sisters 

Congrats Chairs of the 
Week Heather Endler and 
Heather Lewis! 
•Love, Your AZ Sisters 

Happy 21st Birthday 

Jersey! 

■Lov(\ Your AZ Sisters 

Congratuhitions to our 
Sisters of the Week Becky, 
Mehssa Z, Melissa Y and 
Sarah D! Great job ladies! 
Love. A<t>E 

Congrats to the KAP 
Brothers of the Week, 
Vetere and Herrn! 
-KAP 

Congrats to the Shlubby of 
the Week Raleigh Johnson! 
■KAP 

Thanks Mich for the dona- 
tion! 
-KAP 



KAP, 

(lood job in staying out of 
trouble and not having any- 
one thrown in jail! 
-KAP 

ZTA, 

Thanks for coming to the pig 

roast. By the way you suck! 

-KAP 

Lucifer, 

Thanks for a GREAT week- 
end and for cleaning up our 
cigarette butts! 
•KAP 
^■■■■■■■■■■■liiii^^ 

GENERAL 

DO YOU THINK YOU 
MIGHT BE PREGNANT? 

CALL AAA LIFE SER- 
VICES AT 226-7007. FREE 
& CONFIDENTIAL. 

FOR RENT 



541 Railroad Street. 3 stu- 
dents looking for roommate 
for 5 bedroom house. $1100 
a semester. Call Brandon at 
724-448-6279. 

EAGLE PARK APART- 



MENTS: Fully furnished, 
includes utilities, 3 blocks 
from campus. Leasing for 
spring, summer and fall. 
Safe, clean, beautiful. 814- 
226 4300 ■ www.eagle 
park.net. 

APARTMENTS accommo 
dating 14 people and 
Houses for 4-8 people 
AVAILABLE FOR the 
FALL 2006/ SPRING 2007 
semesters. Exceptionally 
nice and well-maintained 
Off Campus Housing!!! 
Come and check us out and 
see for yourself! Call Patty 
or Andrea at 814 226 4430 
(Office) 814-2295190 or 
8147453121 

APARTMENTS for 3 4 peo- 
ple and HOUSES for 47 
people available for the Fall 
2006/Spring 2007 semes- 
ters. Get a great place for 
next year! Call Barb at 814* 
226-0757 or 814-3799721 
for more info. 

ROLL OUT OF BED AND 
GO TO CLASS! Houses and 
apartments next to campus. 
See them at www.grayand- 
company.net or call FREE 



Gray and Co. 877 562- 1020 

Houses for rent 2005 06. 

Close to campus. For 2 and 4 
females. Call 814-226-6867. 

TRAVfeL 



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Information/Reservations 
1 800 648 4849 or 

www.8tstravel.com. 

PERSONALS 



Ashley, 

Awesome testimony. I'm so 
proud that you had the 
courage to give it. I'm really 
glad I could be there for you! 
The Square Root of A- 
Squared 

Happy Birthday Jeannette! 
-From, r/ie Ca/y Staff 

Super Cassiopeia. 
We need to do something 
this weekend. Still up for 
stargazing and duck? 
-Love, Beetlejuice 

Meghan, 

I dropped the kids off at the 

beach. 

•Love, Dusty 

Quark, 

I hate you. Please don't 

leave me again. 

-A frustrated man 

Mel, 

Your two page spread of 



A.L.F. looks great! Keep up 
the great photography work! 
-Your predecessor 

Hawk, 

Thanks for defending my 

honor. 

■Love, Mel 

Jackie, 

Happy 22nd Birthday. I 
can't wait to eat the marble 
cake and have a huge feast. 
■ Love, Tina 

My Woman, 

It's alright, I come with my 

own toolbox. I love you even 

though I may be more of a 

man than you. 

Love, China Doll 

J Money, 

I had such a wonderful 
weekend with you. I can't 
wait until Thanksgiving so I 
can see you again. You 
always manage to make me 
smile and brighten my day. 
Love, T-Money 

Em, 

Good luck with your produc- 
tion this week! I know you'll 
do great! 
Love, Dan 




Justin Danoov 

Junior, Poi rnc ai. Sc 


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LOCJAN MOELLER 

pRi;SilMAN, EnVIRONMIiN lAL BlOlOGY 

"I got a citation." 





Sara Hoover 
and Jenna Angelos 



"What's the worst 

thing that happened to 

you at A.L.F.?" 




ZlVlA Walkkr 

SopHOMORr:, Theater 

"The partie;, my expectations were set too 
high." 



Jenisa Agostino 
Sophomore, Elementary Education 

"Having a girl dance on top of me at a 
party... it was gross." 




TiONA Williams 

SOPHO.MORE, PSYCHOEOOY 

"I passed out at the football house and my 
boyfriend cheated on me. Now he's my ex." 



Llike Martin 

Freshman, Undecided 

"While ordering wings my friends 
pantsed me and I wasn't wearing under- 
wear." 






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October 13. 2005 



THE CLAMON CALL 



PageJi 




Scires 



Eveits 



Iitraiirals 



Cross Country 

Oct. 8 

@ Carnegie Mellon 

W- lof9;M-2of 12 

Football 

Oct. 8 

East Stroudsburg 

0-56, L 

Gk)lf 

Oct. 2-3 

Wheeling Jesuit Invite 

4th of 12 



Soccer 

Oct. 11 
West Chester 
0-0, (2 OT) 

Tennis 

Oct. 1 
@ Niagara 
1-7, L 

VoUeyball 

Oct. 11 

@ Slippery Rock 

0-3, L 



Warriors ruin Clarion homecoming - See page 12 




Photo Courtesy of John Thompson 
.ESU QUARTERBACK JIM TERWILLIGER - scrambles away from defensive pressure during Saturday's 56-0 win over our 
Clarion Golden Eagles 



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ICU at Athletic Events 



Cross Country 

Oct. 15 

@ Waynesburg 

Oct. 29 

@ PS AC Championships 

(Slippery Rock) 



Football 

Oct. 15 
Lock Haven 

Oct. 22 

@ Shippen.sburg 

Oct. 29 
Indiana 



Golf 

Oct. 15-16 

@ PSAC Championships 

Men's Basketball 

Nov. 18-19 

@ Geneva Tournament 

Nov 30 

District of Columbia 



Soccer 

Oct. 15 

@ Slippery Rock 

Oct. 17 
Lock Haven 

Oct. 19 

@ California 

Oct. 21 
@ Salem 

Oct. 23 

St. Vincent 



Swiming and Diving 

Oct. 22 

Clarion Fall Classic 

Oct. 26 
Allegheny 

Oct. 29 

@ Carnegie Mellon 

Oct. 30 

Clarion Diving Invitational 

Nov. 4 

@ Shippensburg 



Volleyball 

Oct. 18 
California 



Oct. 21-22 

@ Shippensburg (Regional) 

Oct. 25 
Indiana 

Nov 1 

@ Edinboro 

Nov. 5 
Lock Haven 

Nov 11-12 

@ PSAC Championships 



Women's Basketball 

Nov 15 
Charleston 

Nov 19 
Point Park 



Wrestling 

Nov 13 

@ Penn State Duals 



1^ 



Doug Knepp - Intramura!, Recreation. & Club Sp<.>rl Director 393-1667 



Dodgeball Champs 

MEN- Steamy Hot Waffle Irons 

CwigratulatitMis to: Brad Gardner, Adam 
Shaffer, Bill Young, Cole Cook, Dan 
Barrett, Dustin Watl, and Jason Warner. 
WOMEN- El Baliaz 
Congratulations to: Erin Yoos. Lindsay 
Dugovich, Lauren Fortnoff, Lauren 
Stauber. Chandra Kalika, Jackie Brower. 
and Christina Allendorfer. 



Ultimate Frisbee Results 

Wednesda). 10/5 

GBofEmot Average Joe's F 

ROC Badunk-a-I>unk 11-0 

The Guacs Americans 1 1 -7 

Tuesday, lO/H 

Americans Guacs 6-5 

GBofEmot ROC n/a 




¥% ^ ■ 'J ^ 


i 



Old Spicg College Gridiron Challenge 

Pick the winners of the 3 Old Spice College 
Gridiron Challenge Games of the Week, and 
you could win an Xbox Console, a Bose 
SoundOock (iPod Docking Station), or a 
Philips 32" LCD TV! 

WWW.ACIS-SPORTS.COM 

Playing is FREE 
5 Vmnners Each Week On Our Campus; 

Old Spice Gridiron Challenge T-shirl 
The top 5 contestants will be notified via 
email Margin of victory will be used as first 
tie-breaker, if a tie still exists then a random 
drawing will be held to select the winners 
Campus Champion (Cumulative Points): 
Xbox Console -or- Bose SoundDock 
ACIS will keep a point total for all registered 
participants At the end of the 6 we<^s. the 
person on our can^s with the most points 
wins their choice of an Xbox Console or 
Bose SoundOock (iPod Docking Station), 
courtesy of OW Spice and ACIS! Margin of 
victory will be used as first tie-breaker, if a tie 
still exists then a random drawing will be hekj 
to select the winner if necessary 



Flag Football Results 

Tuesday. 10/11 
Da Hustia/ No Ma'am 
Prime Time Sleelers 
Hard Muffins Lady Canes 
1) W C't Stop Nuphics 



Quick 6 
B P This 
The I Icat 
St. MU 
KDR 



Schlitz 
Just Bail 
The Beers 
Free Bailers 
Balls Deep 

Wednesday, 10 5 
Just Ball Lunatics 

Free Bailers The I leal 
P W C"t Stop Ball/ Deep 
No Ma'am Schlitz 
KDR Lady Canes 

Annex or PR St. MU 



62-50 

37-14 

24-11 

44-6 

31-14 

36-18 

F 

40-10 

44-12 

44-40 
44-35 
40-22 
46-20 
35-21 
48-6 




10/13/05 



Outdoor Soccer Tourn. Results 

luesday. 10/11 Semi-nnal matches 
Team#l Team #2 2-0 

Internationals Crushers F 

Championship game is scheduled lor: 
Thursday. 10/13 ui 8 pm 



1 



Flag Football Standings 

Top 12 as of 10/11/05 (W-l -I ) 

i.DalluStlaz (7-0) 

2. Prime Time (7-0) 

3. Free Bailers (8-0-1) 

4. Hard Muffins 5 (5-0-1) 

5. Just Ball (6-1) 

6. TlicBeers (5-1) 

7. Dudes We Cant Stop (4- 1 ) 

8. Ball/ Deep (3-2) 

9. Bench Press This (4-4) 

10. Lady Canes (4-6) 
ll.Schiit/'s (3-4) 
12. KDR (3-5) 




Intramurals on the Web 
cIarion.edu/intramurals 

or from the CUP home page click on 
Athletics then Intramurals. 



Volleyball Results 

TticMlav. loAl 
Lady C anes Tuna Tacos 21-5. 
Coulc' Use Im Team M Coynes 
Delta Delta We Suck 
Team RT Don't Cha's 
IX'lta Zeta TBA 
Sexy Women 1) Phi F 



21-18 
V 

y 

F 
F 

F 



«pi 



■v^ 



Page 12 



Tm CLARION CALL 



October 13. 2005 



Today: homei oming football 



U km well at invitational 



Sfirts 

Not-so-happy homecoming; 
Clarion drops third straight, 56-0 



Ryan Cornman 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rdcornman@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 8- As the 
rain fell Saturday on the 
Homecoming Day crowd of 
4,000 at Memorial Stadium, 
points were also being 
poured on by the East 
Stroudsburg Warriors, who 
were victorious over the 
Clarion Golden Eagles 56-0. 

East Stroudsburg was led 
by running back Anthony 
Carfagno, who had three 
rushing touchdowns and 
quarterback Jim 

Terwilliger, who passed for 
347 yards and scored two 
TD's for the 14th ranked 
Warriors. 

East Stroudsburg raised 
their overall record to 5-1, 
while Clarion dipped to 2-4 
on the season. 

ESU scored on six of eight 
first half possessions to 
jump out to a 42-0 lead at 
the intermission. 

Clarion managed only 176 
yards of offense for the day, 
with quarterback Brandon 
Dando completing only four 
of his 14 passes for 23 yards 
and backup Erik Yonish, 
who only completed five-of- 
seven passes for 42 yards. 

Sophomore running back 
Tyrone Buckner gained 38 




eight times for 39 yards and 
three TD's, and caught five 
passes for 48 yards. 

Clarion returns to action 
this Saturday at Memorial 
Stadium to host Lock 
Haven, while East 

Stroudsburg returns home 
next Saturday to host 
Kutztown. 



'hoto courtesy of John Thompson 

JIMMY SIMMONS- scratches his head on the sideline during Saturday's homecoming loss to East 
Stroudsburg, its third straight loss. The Golden Eagles are now 2-4 this season. 



yards on 13 carries, while 
freshman Dave Murzynski 
gained 34 yards on seven 
tries. 

East Stroudsburg had 663 
yards of total offense, with 
401 of them coming in the 



passing game led by 
Terwilliger who completed 
15 of 20 passes for his 341 
yards. Leading the recieving 
core were go-to recievers 
Evan Prall (five catches for 
148 yards) and Tim Strenfel 



(three passes for 115 yards 
and a touchdown). 

The Warriors weren't just 
passing on Saturday, howev- 
er. Running back Derek 
Lucas ran 20 times for 157 
yards, while Carfagno ran 



GameNotm: 

m Clarion has been 
outscored 143-7 in its 
last three games. 

m Clarion's halftime 
deficit of 48-0, was Its 
largest hafftinne deficit 
of the season. 

■ ESU's kicker Mark 
Brubaker converted all 
eight of his extra point 
kicks. m 



m ESU was 7-of-lO on 
third down conversions 
and did not attempt a 
punt. 

■ ESU was eight 
eight In red zone mqg 
Ing opportunities. 




Sports feature: 

Alaskan volleyball player adjusts to CU 



Josh Woods 
Sports Editor 

sJlwoodsl@clarion.edu 



Clarion Golden Eagle 
freshman, volleyball player 
Karaline Naegele came to 
Clarion University from a 
place that students here 
think of as being in a galaxy 
far, far away. 

Naegele, who grew in the 
small town of Palmer, AK 
located about 40 minutes 
outside of the city of 
Anchorage came to Clarion 
for the education and to do 
what she loves to do the 
most: play volleyball. 

In elementary school 
Naegele was a big basket- 
ball buff and used to make 
fun of volleyball, because 
that's what her older sister 
did. 

But in sixth grade she 
decided to give it a try 
because she had nothing 
better to do. 

Lo and behold, to her 
amazement she was actual- 
ly pretty good at it. 

"So I stuck with it over the 
years and kept working at it 
and became better and bet- 
ter and hoped to one day 
play in college," she said. 

Soon she was playing on 
athletic club teams, staying 
after practice and going to 
camps. 

"Kids in Pennsylvania take 
stuff like that for granted 
because they don't have to 
travel as far to get extra 
practice. In Alaska we had 
to travel 40 minutes to get 
to the nearest athletic club," 
said Naegele. 

Due to that determina- 
tion, Naegele is now being 
rewarded through playing' 
at the college level. A 
reward that has not gone 
unnoticed in Palmer. 



In fact a lot of people in 
her community have sent 
her letters or e-mails asking 
her how things are going. 

"The decision to come here 
was exciting for me, because 
it was big news in my town. 
They took my picture and 
wrote a big story about me 
in the local newspaper 
about me signing to play at 
Clarion," said Naegele. 

Because it wasn't everyday 
that someone from Alaska 
went to play a college sport 
in Pennsylvania the excite- 
ment continued to mount. 

"I was looking for a place 
to play volleyball that also 



difficulties that every fresh- 
man faces when being away 
from home, were tenfold for 
Naegele who now found her- 
self the entire length of the 
country away from home. 

First, there was not being 
able to see her friends at 
will. Then, there was the 
difficulty of making new 
friends in a place where she 
didn't know anyone. And' 
finally she had to get used t0 ■ 
the students' lack of kno\y|jj 
edge of Alaska. 

"I was really surprised 
when I came here of every- 
one's ignorance of Alaska; 
people don't really know 




Hoto Courtesy of Karaline Naegele 
ALASKAN KARALINE NAEGELE- calls Clarion her second home 



had a good teaching pro- 
gram and a similar climate 
... I didn't want to go from 
being in Alaska to some 
place like Arizona," said 
Naegele. "I looked at a few 
places and then narrowed it 
down to a place in Colorado, 
Clarion and a few major col- 
leges in Alaska." 

In the end it was Clarion 
that she chose to attend and 
initiate her pursuit of a 
degree in secondary social 
studies. 

The excitement wore off 
quickly, however, with her 
arrival to Clarion 

University as reality sud- 
denly began to set in. The 



much about it," she said. 
"People here know more 
about Russia than they do 
Alaska." 

For example minimum 
wage there is $7.15 an hour, 
which to Pennsylvanians 
seems to be amazing! how- 
ever, the cost of living in 
Alaska is much, much high- 
er so in the end everything 
equals out. Another miscon- 
ception is about the weath- 
er. It doesn't snow in Alaska 
everyday and it is not 
always extremely cold. 

"And Alaska is not 

attached to Hawaii, nor is 
part of Canada and no, 
Alaska isn't entirely com- 



prised of Eskimos," added 
Naegele with a laugh. "I've 
been asked some pretty 
dumb things." 

Being far from home has 
been tough and it's been a 
shock having to balance vol- 
leyball with schoolwork, but 
somehow Naegele has got- 
ten through it all. 

Despite the stupid ques- 
tions and rough schedule, 
things have been going 
rather smoothly overall for 
her because, after all, she is 
playing volleyball and has 
been making friends. 

"My closest friend here has 
been my teammate Hannah 
Robinson, because we're 
both from out of state and 
we just kind of formed a 
bond together. We take stats 
together, hang out together 
and of course do lots of jok- 
ing around," she said. 

Continuing on, Naegele 
said "I've managed every- 
thing though, mostly 
because of my roommate 
Devin." 

When Naegele first came 
here her roommate situa- 
tion wasn't good because her 
roommate was entirely dif- 
ferent so she asked the RA if 
she could switch rooms. 

"I got switched into a dif- 
ferent room, but they had 
forgotten to ask me if I had 
a smoking preference. As 
soon as I walked into my 
new room I discovered a 
pack of cigarettes lying on 
the desk so I went out into 
the hallway where I saw 
Devin and said 'hey do you 
want to be my roommate?' 
and here we are." 

With her roommate at her 
side to be a good friend 
when times were rough, it 
was time to focus on volley- 
ball. Volleyball at Clarion, 
she would fmd was just as 
different as Alaska and 



Pennsylvania, due to the 
change in atmosphere that 
comes with the acclimation 
of a college sport after play- 
ing a high school sport. 

In high school much of 
practice is spent on repeti- 
tive skill-building drills 
whereas in college you focus 
more on one specific element 
that is usually determined 
by what was done correctly 
or not done correctly in the 
last game. 

The strategy is also very 
different as far as each posi- 
tion's responsibilities. 

"It took some time to 
adjust, but I like going to 
practice and I've found it 
interesting talking to some 
of my teammates that are 
still in high school and find- 
ing out how much different 
the two levels really are," 
said Naegele. 

With all the excitement 
out of the way, the special 
day that she had been wait- 
ing for since sixth grade had 
fiinally arrived. 

On Oct. 8 she got to partic- 
ipate in her first match ver- 
sus Cheyney. 

"I was real excited to play. 
The big thing was to let 
everyone know this is how I 
can play and I am out here 
doing my best," said 
Naegele of her first college 
volleyball match. 

With her final goal accom- 
plished there is only one 
thing left to do: fmd out why 
people in Pennsylvania are 
all deer hunting rednecks... 
or not. 

"I've been very proud of 
myself I knew a lot about 
Clarion before I came here 
because I visited the cam- 
pus," said Naegele. "So far 
so good." 



X-C teams 
fare well at 
C-M invite 



Chris McKissick 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_cjmckissickOclarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 7-The 
Clarion University women's 
cross country team took first 
place last Friday at the 
Carnegie Mellon invitation- 
al. 

The Golden Eagle women's 
team beat out the favored 
home team, Carnegie 
Mellon, with a score of 39- 
50. Their total time was 
1:59:52 to Carnegie Mellon's 
2:02:01. 

Cross country scoring is 
done on a team basis. The 
points are awarded to indi- 
vidual runners according to 
the position they finish the 
race and only the first five to 
cross are awarded points. 
The lowest possible score in 
cross country is a 15. 

Sophomore Erin Richards 
continued her impressive 
running with her fourth 
first place finish in a row. 
She finished with a time of 
22:46. 

Senior Katie Jarzab fin- 
ished in second place with a 
time of 23:20. Junior Tasha 
Wheatley finished eighth 
with a time of 23:49. 

"We had a very impressive 
meet and we were without 
one of our better runners in 
Mary Smith," said head 
coach Dan Caufield. 

The Clarion University 
women are now ranked 
tenth in the region. "We 
have a good chance to move 
up those rankings, Caufield 
added. 

"We still haven't gone 
against the better teams in 
the PSAC and I think we 
can fair well against them," 
he said. 

On the men's side, they 
took second at the Carnegie 
Mellon invitational. 

Carnegie Mellon beat the 
Golden Eagles 22-71. 

Their total team time was 
2:11:29 to Clarion's 2:15:41. 
Clarion edged out St. 
Vincent 71-80 for the second 
place finish. 

"We ran real well today," 
Caufield said. "St. Vincent 
is ranked number 22 nation- 
ally in the NAIA, so finish- 
ing ahead of them was real 
big for us." 

Chris Clark paced the 
Clarion men with a third 
place finish and a time of 
26:18. Junior Sean Williams 
finished ninth with a time of 
26:52. 

"Our goal right now is to 
be ranked in the region," 
said Caufield. "The men 
also haven't gone up against 
the best in the PSAC." 

"We raced the Carnegie 
Mellon course really well," 
the Clarion coach said. 
"Our times have been fifty 
seconds to an even five min- 
utes faster here." 

The next meet is this 
Saturday at Waynesburg for 
both the men and women. 

"I expect us to go out there 
and work just as hard as we 
did at Carnegie Mellon," 
Caufield said. 

"I'm really happy with the 
program right now. Every 
meet we have times drop- 
ping and personal records 
being set," said Caulfield. 








Concert for Katrina 

See Entertainment page 8 



Campus Close-Up: 

Pegg Watts-CartwHght, tee page f i 



51 



One copy free 




Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 




ICALL 



Volunne 91 Issue 7 



October 20, 2005 








Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

Wilma lingers, threatens 
After ratcheting up 
Tuesday night to become 
one of the most intense 
storms ever recorded over 
the Atlantic basin. 
Hurricane Wilma 

Wednesday became even 
more troublesome by baf- 
fling forecasters trying to 
predict where it would 
make landfall. 

The Category 5 storm 
was located 285 miles 
southeast of Cozumel, 
Mexico, yesterday 

evening, and was moving 
west-northwest about 7 
miles per hour. A ''consen- 
sus" forecast from the 
National Hurricane 

Center projected the 
storm would turn east- 
ward and head across 
southern Florida over the 
weekend. 

Environmental group 
charges, military sonar 
threatens whales 
WASHINGTON - The 
loud blasts of sound rou- 
tinely used by Navy ships 
to operate their sonar sys- 
tems is killing and disori- 
enting whales and other 
marine mammals and 
should be far more strictly 
limited, an environmental 
group argued in a federal 
lawsuit filed Wednesday. 

The suit, filed by the 
Natural Resources 

Defense Council in 
California, charges that 
the routine use of sonar in 
Navy training and testing 
is illegal under federal 
environmental law and is 
needlessly harmful. 

IPods fast becoming new 
teacher's pet 

WASHINGTON -At some 
schools, the rules are 
clear: Kids can chill out to 
downloaded music on 
portable players, but once 
they're inside, iPods and 
other learning distrac- 
tions must be stowed in 
backpacks or lockers and 
kept there. 

At Jamestown 

Elementary School in 
Arlington, Va., Camilla 
Gagliolo took another 
approach. Rather than 
fighting the fad, she's cap- 
italizing on it by giving 
students iPods and re- 
imagining them as a 
learning tool. 

Publishers sue Google, 
aim to stop scanning proj- 
ect 

WASHINGTON - Five 
major publishers sued 
Google Inc. Wednesday, 
alleging that the search 
engine's plans to scan mil- 
lions of library books so 
they can be viewed on the 
Internet is a blatant viola- 
tion of copyright law. 
In a lawsuit filed in feder- 
al court in Manhattan, 
the publishers asked a 
federal judge to block 
Google from resuming its 
scanning of books on Nov. 
1. Google had temporarily 
stopped digitizing books 
while it sought a compro- 
mise with publishers. 



State police Investigate alleged Incident 



John Santa 
News Editor 
and Dan Edington 
Managing Editor 



CLARION, Oct. 20 - Late 
Wednesday night state 
police responded to an 
alleged disturbance that 
occurred at 285 South Fifth 
Avenue. The residence is 
divided into a number of 
apartments, and the exact 
information as to which 
apartment the disturbance 
may have occurred in is still 
unknown. The exact events 
that occurred are also still 
unknown. 

Pennsylvania State Police 
have yet to file an official 
report, and the officers on 




Melissa Holller/r/ie Clarion Call 

SOUTH FIFTH AVENUE - Police responded to an alleged incident Wednesday evening. The back yard (left) of 285 South Fifth 
Avenue is where witnesses say the disturbance may have occured. 



the scene declined comment. 
Individual organizations 
responding to the scene 
included local paramedics 
and the Clarion University 
Director of Public Safety, 
David Tedjeske. 



According to Alycia Rea, 
Leann Miles and Erica 
Place, who reside on South 
Fifth Avenue, respondents 
to the scene allegedly 
included two police cars and 
two ambulances, which 



arrived between 8:15 p.m. 
and 8:30 p.m. The residents 
also alleged that they saw 
the use of a stretcher by the 
paramedics on scene. 

The owner of the apart- 
ment, Walter Smith, also 



arrived on the scene but was 
not able to provide any addi- 
tional information. 

More information will be 
provided by Pennsylvania 
State Police at a later date. 



Task force Investigates missing Clarion alum 




Clarion alumnus Patrick Ryan allegedly found dead in August 



Lindsay Grystar 
Assistant News Editor 

s_llgrystar@clarion.eclu 



tesy or tne Ryan family 
PATRICK RYAN - The Clarion alumnus, pictured here with his girl- 
friend Melissa Ernst, went missing on Aug. 13. His body was 
allegedly found on Aug. 23, and his death is under investigation. 
Ernst also graduated from Clarion with an Master of Science in 
Library Science this past May. 



CLARION, Oct. 20 - A task force meeting was held last 
Thursday involving the case of missing Clarion University 
student Patrick Ryan. 

Present at the task force meeting were the Clarion 
Borough Police and State Police from Clarion, Tionesta and Punxsutawney. 

Thursday's task meeting was the most recent among the many meetings involving this 
case. 

"We've had probably 20 or 30 meetings so far. Maybe more," said Chief Hall. 

Chief Hall is the Chief of Clarion Borough Police, and he was present at Thursday's meet- 
ing. 

Jhe family is offering up to a $10,000 reward for information leading to the prosecution 
of anyone criminally involved in Patrick's disappearance. 

"The reward is still being offered and will hopefully bring forward new information rele- 
vant to the case," said Debbie Ryan, Patrick's mother. 

Patrick Ryan had gone missing Aug 13, and a body found Aug 23 in Forrest County was 
later confirmed to be his. Investigators are still working to find out why he would have 
been in the area where his body was found. 

"You just can't be too careful," said Debbie Ryan. 

Authorities said Patrick Ryan was last seen at the Captain Loomis bar in Clarion, which 
is about 30 miles from where his body was found. The body was found in Forrest County 
by a man who was taking a lunch break, and an autopsy did not conclusively say how Ryan 
died. 

Ryan graduated from Clarion and had returned to study for his Masters of Science in 
Library Science. Several other members of his family are also Clarion alumni. 



911 center location controversial 



Brittnee Koebler 
Assistant Editor 

s_bekoebler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 20 - Debate 
over the placement of the 
new 911 equipment contin- 
ues, while some question 
the Clarion County Office of 
Emergency Services (OES) 
being housed in the former 
jail. 

The installation of this 
state-of-the-art equipment, 
totaling $982,687, will allow 
dispatchers to know the 
GPS location of the caller. 

Currently, the OES and 
the 911 control center are 
being housed in the former 
jail. The 911 control center 
has been housed in this 
building since 1973. The 
area that is utilized whenev- 
er called into action to 
respond to an emergency, 
the Emergency Command 
Post, is located in the base- 
ment. 

Yet, controversy has sur- 
faced concerning these new 
plans. 

According to the 
"Commissioners Defend 
OES Building" stor, in The 
Clarion News on Oct. 13, 
Scott Sherry, a flight para- 
medic, 911 dispatcher and 
former emergency manage- 
ment services director, 
claims that the jail is unfit 
for these new plans. 



However, the commission- 
ers have put much effort 
into finding the most suit- 
able location. 

"Over the past five years 
the commissioners have 
looked at other buildings to 
house the 911 Center, but all 
of those efforts proved to be 
quite costly! one, to pur- 
chase the ground, and two, 
to transfer equipment. In 
order to continually run the 
911 Center, a separate 
Center would have to be 
constructed at the same 
time we continued to oper- 
ate. When the figures came 
in, we estimated that the 
cost to do this would have 
been between $6-$7 million. 
The county did not have this 
type of money, so we looked 
at the current building and 
decided to do renovations 
and upgrades in a 'phased' 
project," said Commissioner 
Donna Hartle. 

In addition, Hartle said, 
"This building has been con- 
sidered structurally sound. 
The construction of this 
building has four-foot sohd 
sandstone foundations with 
three-foot solid 

sandstone/brick interior 
walls. On the outside it does 
look like a fortress and is 
constructed the same." 

The 911 equipment has 
also continually been 
upgraded throughout the 
many 'phases' of this project. 




Jonathan Donelll/T/ie Clarion Call 

911 Center - The current 
Clarion County Office of 
Emergency Services is locat- 
ed in the former jaiL 

according to Hartle. She 
also said that under the 
Pennsylvania Emergency 
Management Agency guide- 
lines, they are required to 
have wireless technology 
incorporated into the sys- 
tem by June 2006. 

"Also, I have, on behalf of 
the other two commission- 
ers, secured a U.S. 
Deparment of Justice grant 
for Global Information 
Systems/Computer Aided 
Dispatch (GIS/CAD), to be 
added onto the new 911 
equipment. That grant 
totaled $147,000. This was 
made possible through 
Senators Specter and 
Santorum and 

Congressman Peterson," 
Hartle said. 

Hartle traveled, with one 
other staff member, to 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



on Monday, Oct. 17, to begin 
training for the completion 
of the federal forms, and the 
processes to obtain this 
GIS/CAD equipment. 

The Clarion OES/911 
Emergency Dispatch Center 
was the second facility of its 
kind in Pennsylvania. 

"After 32 years in opera- 
tion, I am very proud to say 
that what we have here in 
Clarion County truly offers 
our citizens the very best 
technology and emergency 
services available. We have 
made our long range plans 
and goals for that facility 
and operation and feel that 
it is the very best at the 
least cost to our taxpayers," 
said Hartle. 

Both community members 
and Clarion students may 
feel the issue is important. 

Freshman Stephanie 
Klingman said, "I think that 
me being a young female 
student,having this will be 
very beneficial for my safety 
in the future." 

In addition, David 
Tedjeske, Director of Public 
Safety at Clarion University 
said, "The Clarion County 
Office of Ernergency 
Services has an excellent 
working relationship with 
Clarion University's Public 
Safety Department, and I 
would expect that to remain 
the same regardless of 
where the center is located." 



Senate 
approves 
Real Estate 
Club RSO, 
funds AGBS 

Dan Edington 
Managing Editor 

CLARION, Oct 17 - 
Student senate's seventh 
meeting of the fall semester 
was held on Oct. 17, where 
the Association of Graduate 
Business Students (AGBS) 
was allocated money for a 
trip, the Real Estate Club 
was approved as a new rec- 
ognized student organiza- 
tion (RSO) and several 
announcements were made. 
A motion was passed, 19-1- 
1 to allocate $1,335 to AGBS 
for an annual trip the group 
takes to New York City. 
During discussion of the 
motion, a representative 
from AGBS asked to have 
the request's total changed 
from the initial $1,335 to 
$1,818. The original request 
was to help pay for vans, 
parking and hotel. However, 
due to late attempts to 
reserve the vans and hotel, 
the cost of the trip was 
increased when other 
arrangements were made. 
See 'SENATE' on page 2. 



I t 



Page 12 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



October 13. 2005 



Tiiiliiv: liiiiiiiNiiiiiinoliiiilliiil 



Sfiris 

Not-so-happy homecoming; 
Clarion drops third straight, 56-0 



\-ll'iiiTswHhiliiiviliiliiiiii 



Ryan Cornman 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

S.rdCO»nm(i(i@cltirioii.t;(lii 

CLARION, (Jtt. H- As tlu- 
rain fell Saturday on the 
Honu'coming Day crowd of 
4.000 at Memorial Stadium, 
points were also being 
poured on by the East 
Stroudsburs Warriors, who 
were victorious over the 
Clarion Colden fc^agles 56-0. 

East Stroudsburg was led 
by running back Anthony 
Carfagno. who had three 
rushing touchdowns and 
quarterback Jun 

Terwilliger. who passed for 
347 yards and scored two 
TD's for the 14th ranked 
Warriors. 

East Stroudsburg raised 
their overall record to .">-]. 
while Clarion dipped to 2-4 
on the season. 

ESU scored on six of eight 
first half possessions to 
jump out to a 42-0 lead at 
the intermission. 

Clarion managed only 1 76 
yards of offense for the day. 
with quarterback Brandon 
Dando completing only four 
of his 14 passes for 23 yards 
and backup Erik Yonish. 
who only completed five-of- 
seven passes for 42 yards. 

Sophomore running back 
IVrone Buckner gained ;^<S 




eight times for 39 yards and 
three TD's. and caught five 
passes for 48 yards. 

Clai'ion returns to action 
tins Saturday at Memorial 
Stadium to host Lock 
Haven. while East 

Stroudsburg returns home 
next Saturday to host 
Kutztown. 



Photo courtesy of John Thompson 

JIMMY SIMMONS- scratches his head on the sideline during Saturday's homecoming loss to East 
Stroudsburg, its third straight loss. The Golden Eagles are now 2-4 this season. 



yards on 13 carries, while 
freshman Dave Murzynski 
gained ;)4 yards on seven 
tries. 

East Stroudsburg had 663 
yards of total offense, with 
401 of them coming in the 



passing game led by 
Terw'illiger who completed 
15 of 20 passes for his 341 
yards. Leading the recieving 
core were go-to recievers 
Evan Prall (five catches for 
148 vards) and Tim Strenfel 



(three passes for 115 yards 
and a touchdown). 

The Warriors weren't just 
passing on Saturday, howev- 
er. Running back Derek 
Lucas ran 20 times for 157 
yards, while Carfagno ran 



Game Notes: 

m Clarion has been 
outscored 143-7 In its 
last three games. 

■ Clarion's halftime 
deficit of 48-0, was its 
largest halftime deficit 
of the season. 

■ ESU's kicker Mark 
Brubaker converted all 
eight of his extra point 
kicks. 

■ ESU was 7-of-lO on 
third down conversions 
and did not attempt a 
punt. 

■ ESU was eight of 
eight in red zone scor- 
ing opportunities. 



Sports feature: 

Alaskan volleyball player adjusts to CU 



Josh Woods 
Sports Editor 

sjlwoodsl@clarion.eciu 



Clarion Golden Eagle 
freshman, volleyball player 
Karaline Naegele came to 
Clarion University from a 
place that students here 
think of as being in a galaxy 
far. far away. 

Naegele. who grew in the 
small town of Palmer. AK 
located about 40 minutes 
outside of the city of 
Anchorage came to Clarion 
for the education and to do 
what she loves to do the 
most: play volleyball. 

In elementary school 
Naegele was a big basket- 
ball buff and used to make 
fun of volleyball, because 
that's what her older si.ster 
did. 

But in sixth grade she 
decided to give it a try 
because she had nothing 
better to do. 

Lo and behold, to her 
amazement she was actuah 
b pretty good at it. 

'So I stuck with it over the 
years and kept working at it 
and became better and bet- 
ter and hoped to one day 
play in college." she said. 

Soon she was playing on 
athletic club teams, staying 
after practice and going to 
camps. 

"Kids in Lennsylvania take 
stuff like that for granted 
because they don't have to 
travel as far to get extra 
practice. In Alaska we had 
to travel 40 minutes to get 
to the nearest athletic club." 
said Naegele. 

Due to that determina- 
tion. Naegele is now being 
rewarded through playing 
at the college level. A 
reward that has not gone 
unnoticed in Palmer. 



In fact a lot of people in 
her community have sent 
her letters or e-mails asking 
her how things are going. 

"The decision to come here 
was exciting for me. because 
it was big news in my town. 
They took my pictm-e and 
wrote a big story about me 
in the local newspaper 
about me signing to play at 
Clarion." said Naegele. 

Because it wasn't everyday 
that someone from Alaska 
went to play a college sport 
in Pennsylvania the excite- 
ment continued to mount. 

"I was looking for a place 
to play volleyball that also 



difficulties that every fresh- 
man faces when being away 
from home, were tenfold for 
Naegele who now found her- 
self the entire length of the 
country away from home. 

First, there was not being 
able to see her friends at 
will. Then, there was the 
difficulty of making new 
friends in a place where she 
didn't know anyone. And 
finally she had to get used to 
the students' lack of knowl- 
edge of Alaska. 

"I was really surprised 
when I came here of every- 
one's ignorance of Alaska^ 
people don't really know- 




had a good teaching pro- 
gram and a similar climate 
... I didn't want to go from 
being in Alaska to some 
place like Arizona." said 
Naegele. "I looked at a few 
places and then narrowed it 
down to a place in Colorado. 
Clarion and a few major col- 
leges in Alaska." 

In the end it was Clarion 
that she chose to attend and 
initiate her pursuit of a 
degree in secondary social 
studies. 

The excitement wore off 
quicklv. however, with her 
arrival to Clarion 

University as reality sud- 
denly began to set in. The 



much about it." she said. 
"People here know more 
about Russia than they do 
Alaska." 

For example minimum 
wage there is $7.15 an hour, 
which to Pennsylvanians 
seems to be amazing: how- 
ever, the cost of living in 
Alaska is much, much high- 
er so in the end everything 
equals out. Another miscon- 
ception is about the weath- 
er. It doesn't snow in Alaska 
everyday and it is not 
always extremely cold. 

"And Alaska is not 

attached to Hawaii, nor is 
part of Canada and no, 
Alaska isn't entirelv com- 



prised of Eskimos," added 
Naegele with a laugh. "I've 
been asked some pretty 
dumb things." 

Being far from home has 
been tough and it's been a 
shock having to balance vol- 
leyball with schoolwork. but 
somehow Naegele has got- 
ten through it all. 

Despite the stupid ques- 
tions and rough schedule, 
things have been going 
rather smoothly overall for 
her because, after all, she is 
playing volleyball and has 
been making friends. 

"My closest friend here has 
been my teammate Hannah 
Robinson, because we're 
both from out of state and 
we just kind of formed a 
bond together. We take stats 
together, hang out together 
and of course do lots of jok- 
ing around," she said. 

Continuing on, Naegele 
said "I've managed every- 
thing though, mostly 
because of my roommate 
Devin." 

When Naegele first came 
here her roommate situa- 
tion wasn't good because her 
roommate was entirely dif- 
ferent so she asked the RA if 
she could switch rooms. 

"I got switched into a dif- 
ferent room, but they had 
forgotten to ask me if I had 
a smoking preference. As 
soon as I walked into my 
new room I discovered a 
pack of cigarettes lying on 
the desk so I went out into 
the hallway where I saw 
Devin and said 'hey do you 
want to be my roommate?' 
and here we are." 

With her roommate at her 
side to be a good friend 
when times were rough, it 
was time to focus on volley- 
ball. Volleyball at Clarion, 
she would find was just as 
different as Alaska and 



Pennsylvania, due to the 
change in atmosphere that 
comes with the acclimation 
of a college sport after play- 
ing a high school sport. 

In high school much of 
practice is spent on repeti- 
tive skill-building drills 
whereas in college you focus 
more on one specific element 
that is usually determined 
by what was done correctly 
or not done correctly in the 
last game. 

The strategy is also very 
different as far as each posi- 
tion's responsibilities. 

"It took .some time to 
adjust, but I like going to 
practice and I've found it 
interesting talking to some 
of my teammates that are 
still in high school and find- 
ing out how much different 
the two levels really are," 
said Naegele. 

With all the excitement 
out of the way, the special 
day that she had been wait- 
ing for since sixth grade had 
finally arrived. 

On Oct. 8 she got to partic- 
ipate in her first match ver- 
sus Cheyney. 

"I was real excited to play. 
The big thing was to let 
everyone know this is how I 
can play and I am out here 
doing my best," said 
Naegele of her first college 
volleyball match. 

With her final goal accom- 
plished there is only one 
thing left to do: find out why 
people in Pennsylvania are 
all deer hunting rednecks... 
or not. 

"I've been very proud of 
myself I knew a lot about 
Clarion before I came here 
because I visited the cam- 
pus," said Naegele. "So far 
so good." 



X-C teams 
fare well at 
C-M invite 



Chris McKissick 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

5_cjnickissick@clarion.e(Ju 

CLARION, Oct. 7-The 
Clarion University women's 
cross country team took first 
place last Friday at the 
Carnegie Mellon invitation- 
al. 

The (Jolden Eagle women's 
team beat out the favored 
home team. Carnegie 
Mellon, with a score of 39- 
50. Their total time was 
1:59:52 to Carnegie Mellon's 
2:02:01. 

Cross country scoring is 
done on a team basis. The 
points are awarded to indi- 
vidual runners according to 
the position they finish the 
race and only the first five to 
cross are awarded points. 
The lowest possible score in 
cross country is a 15. 

Sophomore Erin Richards 
continued her impressive 
running with her fourth 
first place finish in a row. 
She finished with a time of 
22:46. 

Senior Katie Jarzab fin- 
ished in second place with a 
time of 23:20. Junior Tasha 
Wheatley finished eighth 
with a time of 23:49. 

"We had a very impressive 
meet and we were without 
one of our better runners in 
Mary Smith," said head 
coach Dan Caufield. 

The Clarion University 
women are now ranked 
tenth in the region. "We 
have a good chance to move 
up those rankings, Caufield 
added. 

"We still haven't gone 
against the better teams in 
the PSAC and I think we 
can fair well against them," 
he said. 

On the men's side, they 
took second at the Carnegie 
Mellon invitational. 

Carnegie Mellon beat the 
Golden Eagles 22-71. 

Their total team time was 
2:11:29 to Clarion's 2:15:41. 
Clarion edged out St. 
Vincent 71-80 for the second 
place finish. 

"We ran real well today," 
Caufield said. "St. Vincent 
is ranked number 22 nation- 
ally in the NAIA, so finish- 
ing ahead of them was real 
big for us." 

Chris Clark paced the 
Clarion men with a third 
place finish and a time of 
26:18. Junior Sean Williams 
finished ninth with a time of 
26:52. 

"Our goal right now is to 
be ranked in thi; region," 
said Caufield. "The men 
also haven't gone up against 
the best in the PSAC." 

"We raced the Carnegie 
Mellon course really well," 
the Clarion coach said. 
"Our times have been fifty 
seconds to an even five min- 
utes faster here." 

The next meet is this 
Saturday at Waynesburg for 
both the men and women 

"I expect us to go out there 
and work just as hard as we 
did at Carnegie Mellon." 
Caufield said. 

"I'm really happy with the 
program right now. Every 
meet we have times drop- 
ping and personal records 
being set." said Caulfield. 



Want to write for 
The Clarion Call? 

Contact- 
Josh Woods 
393-2380 



J 



4 



i 



1 
! 



i 



1 



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■i 



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One copy free 



Concert tor Katrina 

See Entertainment page 8 



Campus Close-Up: 

Pegg Watts-Cartivrlght, see page S I 



■Qk- 



THE CLARIOI CALL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 



Volume 91 Issue 7 



^ 



October 20, 2005 






- ,r->" .X. 



Los Angeles Times 
Washington Post News Service 

Wilma lingers, threatens 
After ratcheting up 
''I\iesday night to become 
one of the most intense 
storms ever recorded over 
the Atlantic basin. 
Hurricane Wilma 

Wednesday became even 
more troublesome by baf- 
fling forecasters trying to 
predict where it would 
make landfall. 

The Category 5 storm 
was located 285 miles 
southeast of Cozumel, 
Mexico, yesterday 

evening, and was moving 
west-northwest about 7 
miles per hour. A "consen- 
sus" forecast from the 
National Hurricane 

Center projected the 
storm would turn east- 
ward and head across 
southern Florida over the 
weekend. 

Environmental group 
charges, military sonar 
threatens whales 
WASHINGTON - The 

loud blasts of sound rou- 
tinely used by Navy ships 
to operate their sonar sys- 
tems is killing and disori- 
enting whales and otber 
marine mammals and 
should be far more strictly 
limited, an environmental 
group argued in a federal 
lawsuit filed Wednesday. 

The suit, filed by the 
Natural Resources 

Defense Council in 
California, charges that 
the routine use of sonar in 
Navy training and testing 
is illegal under federal 
environmental law and is 
needlessly harmful. 

IPods fast becoming new 
teacher's pet 

WASHINGTON -At some 
schools, the rules are 
clear: Kids can chill out to 
downloaded music on 
portable players, but once 
they're inside, iPods and 
other learning distrac- 
tions must be stowed in 
backpacks or lockers and 
kept there. 

At Jamestown 

Elementary School in 
Arlington, Va., Camilla 
Gagliolo took another 
approach. Rather than 
fighting the fad, she's cap- 
italizing on it by giving 
students iPods and re- 
imagining them as a 
learning tool. 

Publishers sue Google, 
aim to stop scanning proj- 
ect 

WASHINGTON - Five 
major publishers sued 
Google Inc. Wednesday, 
alleging that the search 
engine's plans to scan mil- 
lions of library books so 
they can be viewed on the 
Internet is a blatant viola- 
tion of copyright law. 
In a lawsuit filed in feder- 
al court in Manhattan, 
the publishers asked a 
federal judge to block 
Google from resuming its 
scanning of books on Nov. 
1. Gooi^le had temporarily 
stopped digitizing books 
while it sought a compro- 
mise with publishers. 



State police investigate alleged incident 



John Santa 
News Editor 
and Dan Edington 
Managing Editor 



CLARION. Oct. 20 Late 
Wednesday night state 
police responded to an 
alleged disturbance that 
occurred at 285 South Fifth 
Avenue. The residence is 
divided into a number of 
apartments, and the exact 
information as to which 
apartment the disturbance 
may have occurred in is still 
unknown. The exact events 
that occurred are also still 
unknown. 

Pennsylvania State Police 
have yet to file an official 
report, and the officers on 




Melissa HoUiet, The Clarion Call 
SOUTH FIFTH AVENUE - Police responded to an alleged incident Wednesday evening. The back yard (left) of 285 South Fifth 
Avenue is where witnesses say the disturbance may have occured. 



the scene declined comment. 
Individual organizations 
responding to the scene 
included local paramedics 
and the Clarion University 
Director of Public Safety. 
David Tedjeske. 



According to Alycia Rea. arrived between (S:15 p.m. arrived on the scene but was 
Leann Miles and Erica and 8:30 p.m. The residents not able to provide any addi- 



Place. who reside on South 
Fifth Avenue, respondents 
to the scene allegedly 
included two police cars and 
two ambulances, which 



also alleged that they saw 
the use of a stretcher by the 
paramedics on .scene. 

The owner of the apart- 
ment. Walter Smith, also 



tional information. 

More information will be 
provided by Pennsylvania 
State Police at a later date. 



Task force investigates missing Clarion alum 







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Clarion alumnus Patrick Ryan allegedly found dead in August 



Lindsay Grystar 
Assistant News Editor 

- 'igrystar@clarion.eclu 



Pnoto courtesy of the Ryan family 
PATRICK RYAN ^ The Clarion alumnus, pictured here with his girl- 
friend Melissa Ernst, went missing on Aug. 13. His body was 
allegedly found on Aug. 23, and his death is under investigation. 
Ernst also graduated from Clarion with an Master of Science in 
Library Science this past May 



CLARION. Oct. 20 - A task force meeting was iield last 
Thursday involving the case of missing Clarion University 
student Patrick R\'an. 

Present at the task force meeting were the Clarion 
Borough Police and State Police from Clarion. Tionesta and Punxsutawney. 

Thursdays task meeting was the most recent among the many meetings involving this 
case. 

"We Ve had probably 20 or 30 meetings so far. Maybe more." said Chief Hall. 

Chief Hall is the Chief of Clarion Borough Police, and he was present at Thursday's meet- 
ing. 

The family is offering up to a $10,000 reward for information leading to the ^ivosecution 
n| anyone criminally involved in Patrick's disappearance. 

"The reward is still being offered and will hopefully bring Ibrward new information rele- 
vant to the case." said Debbie I^yan. Patrick s mother. 

Patrick Ryan had gone missiiig Aug L'i and a body found Aug 23 in Forrest County was 
later confirmed to be his. Investigators are still working to find out why he would have 
been in the area where his body was foiuid. 

"You just can't be too careful." said Debbie Ryan. 

Authorities said Patrick Ryan was last seen at the Captain Loomis bar in Clarion, which 
is about 30 miles from where his body was found. The body was found in Forrest County 
by a man who was taking a lunch break, and an autopsy did not conclusively say how Ryan 
died. 

Ryan graduated from Clarion and had returned to study for his Masters of Science in 
Library Science. Several other members of his familv are also Clarion alumni. 



911 center location controversial 



Brittnee Koebler 
Assistant Editor 

s_bekoebleri!i'clanon.edi.i 

CLARION, Oct. 20 - Debate 
over the placement of the 
new 911 equipment contin- 
ues, while some question 
the Clarion County Office of 
Emergency Services (OES) 
being housed in the former 
jail. 

The installation of this 
state-of-the-art equipment, 
totahng $982,687, will allow 
dispatchers to know the 
GPS location of the caller. 

Currently, the OES and 
the 911 control center are 
being housed in the former 
jail. The 911 control center 
has been housed in this 
building since 1973, The 
area that is utilized whenev- 
er called into action to 
respond to an emergency, 
the Emergency Command 
Post, is located in the base- 
ment. 

Yet. controversy has sur- 
faced concerning these new 
plans. 

According to the 
"Commissioners Defend 
OES Building" stor, in The 
Clarion News on Oct. 13, 
Scott Sheri'v. a flight para- 
medic, 911 dispatcher and 
former emergency manage- 
ment services director, 
claims that the jail is unfit 
for these new plans. 



However, the commission- 
ers have put much elfort 
into finding the most suit 
able location. 

"Over the past five years 
the commissioners have 
looked at other buildings to 
liouse the 911 Center, but all 
of those efforts proved to be 
quite costly; one. to pur 
chase the ground, and two. 
to transfer equipment. In 
order to continually run the 
911 Center, a separate 
Center would have to be 
constructed at the same 
time we continued to oper- 
ate. When the figures came 
in. we estimated that the 
cost to do this would have 
been between $6-$7 million. 
The county did not have this 
type of money, so we looked 
at the current building and 
decided to do renovations 
and upgrades in a "phased" 
project," said Commissioner 
Donna Hartle. 

In addition. Hartle said. 
"This building has been con- 
sidered structurally sound. 
The construction of this 
building has four-foot solid 
sandstone foundations with 
three-foot solid 

sandstone/brick interior 
walls. On the outside it does 
look like a fortress and is 
constructed the same." 

The 911 equipment has 
also continually been 
upgraded throughout the 
many "phases" of this project. 




Jonathan Donelli/The Clarion Call 

911 Center - The current 
Clarion County Office of 
Emergency Services is locat- 
ed in the former jail. 

according to Hartle. She 
also said that under the 
Pennsylvania Emergency 
Management Agency guide- 
lines, they are required to 
have wireless technology 
incorporated into the sys- 
tem by June 2006. 

"'Also. I have, on behalf of 
the other two commission- 
ers, secured a U.S. 
Deparment of Justice grant 
for Global Information 
Systems/Computer Aided 
Dispatch (GIS/CAD). to be 
added onto the new 911 
equipment. That grant 
totaled .$147,000. This was 
made possible through 
Senators Spector and 
Santorum and 

Congressman Peterson." 
Hartle said. 

Hartle traveled, with one 
other staff member, to 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



on Monday, Oct. 17. to begin 
ti-aining for the completion 
of the federal forms, and the 
processes to obtain this 
GIS/CAD equipment. 

The Clarion OES/91] 
Emergency Dispatch Center 
was the second facility of its 
kind in Pennsylvania. 

""After 32 years in opera- 
tion. I am very proud to say 
that what we have here in 
Clarion County truly offers 
our citizens the very best 
technology and emergency 
services available. We have 
made our long range plans 
and goals for that facility 
and operation and feel that 
it is the very best at the 
least cost to our taxpayers." 
said Hartle. 

Both community members 
and Clarion students may 
feel the issue is important. 

Freshman Stephanie 
Klingman said, '"I think that 
me being a young female 
student, having this will be 
very beneficial for my safety 
in the future." 

In addition. David 
Tedjeske. Director of Public 
Safety at Clarion University 
said. "The Clarion County 
Office of Ep-'ergency 
Services has an excellent 
working relationship with 
Clarion University's Public 
Safety Department, and I 
would expect that to remain 
the same regardless of 
where the center is located." 



Senate 
approves 
Real Estate 
Club RSO, 
funds AG BS 

Dan Edington 
Managing Editor 

CLARION, ~. 17 - 
Student senate's seventh 
meeting of the fall semester 
was held on Oct. 17. where 
the Association of Graduate 
Business Students (A(JBS) 
was allocated money for a 
trip, the Real Estate Club 
was approved as a new rec- 
ognized student organiza- 
tion (RSO) and several 
annovuicements were made. 
A motion was passed. 19-1- 
1 to allocate $1,335 to AGBS 
for an annual trip the group 
takes to New York City. 
During discussion of the 
motion, a representative 
from AGBS asked to have 
the request's total changed 
from the initial $1.33.5 to 
$1,818. The original request 
was to help pay for vans, 
parking and hotel. However, 
due to late attempts to 
reserve the vans and hotel, 
the cost of the trip was 
increased wlien other 
arrangements were made. 
See 'SENATE' on page 2. 



Page 2 



Tlffi CLARION CAUL 



October 20. 2005 



October 20. 2005 



THE CLARION CALL 



Page 3 



lews 



CEO of Children's Hospital to speak at Clarion 



Jeffry Richards 

Assistant Circulation Manager 

sJprichardsttclarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 18 - Roger 
Oxendale, president and 
CEO of Children's Hospital 
of Pittsburgh and former 
Clarion University gradu- 
ate, will be speaking at a 
presentation on Friday, Oct. 
21 at 10 a.m. in rooms 250- 
252 of Gemmell Student 
Complex. The focus of the 
presentation is on his career 
in the health care industry. 
The presentation is free and 
open to the public. 

Oxendale received his 
bachelor's degree in busi- 
ness administration from 
Clarion in 1976, then his 
M.B.A. in 1977. He has been 



with Children's Hospital in 
Pittsburgh since 1995 when 
he was hired as chief finan- 
cial officer. He then was pro- 
moted to chief operating 
officer in 2000. 

"U.S. News and World 
Report" consistently ranks 
Children's Hospital in 
Pittsburgh as one of the top 
pediatric hospitals in the 
United States. Oxendale 
also played a large role in 
negotiationing of the UPMC 
and Children's Hospital 
merger. He is also involved 
with various youth non- 
profit programs in the area. 

Prior to his career with 
Children's Hospital, he 
worked as senior financial 
executive with Allegheny 
Health, Education and 



Research Foundation. He 
was also a senior audit man- 
ager with the Price 




Roger Oxendale 



Waterhouse Coopers in 
Pittsburgh. 

Oxendale was invited by 
the Center for Advancement 



at Clarion to give the pres- 
entation. During this pres- 
entation he will be express- 
ing how he got involved in 
the medical field and what it 
is like. It will be then moved 
to an open forum where stu- 
dents, faculty and the com- 
munity members who are 
present can ask questions 
and get feedback from him. 
According to Chuck Desch 
from the Center for 
Advancement, students are 
encouraged to ask questions 
about why Oxendale chose 
Clarion and his experiences 
with the university. 
Oxendale himself was 
unavailable for any com- 
ments on the exact agenda 
of the presentation. 



Trial of 
Milosevic 
tiolds lessons 
for Iraqi 
prosecutors 



Moily Moore 

Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

THE HAGUE, 

Netherlands, Oct. 18 — 
Three years and eight 
months into the war crimes 
trial of former Yugoslav 
president Slobodan 

Milosevic, the courtroom 
still crackles with explosive 
outbursts. 

"You know perfectly well 
those people were 
butchered," prosecutor 
Geoffrey Nice shouted at a 
former Serbian police chief 
this month while question- 
ing him about the deaths of 
more than 40 ethnic 
Albanians in the Kosovo vil- 
lage of Racak during the 
winter of 1999. 

"This is preposterous," 
shot back the witness, 
Bogoljub Janicevic, his wire- 
rimmed glasses sliding 
down his nose. 

On the opposite side of the 
courtroom, on the fifth 
anniversary of his fall from 
power in Belgrade, the 
white-haired Milosevic sat 
impassively. But his face 
darkened several shades of 
red, as often happens when 
testimony heats up. 

As Iraqi prosecutors pre- 
pare for the trial of former 
president Saddam Hussein, 
scheduled to begin in 
Baghdad on Wednesday, 
Milosevic's slow-moving 
case at the U.N. Balkans 
war crimes tribunal demon- 
strates the many pitfalls 
entailed in trying deposed 
leaders in a court of law: 
The defendants drag out 
their cases, they can intimi- 
date witnesses, and any 
links to atrocities are usual- 
ly concealed by layers of 
subordinates. 



GOT A NEWS 
TIP? 

CONTACT 

The Clarion Call 
X2380 



HSEC to begin new program 



Katie Fischer 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kcfischer@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 18 - 
Clarion's Health and 
Science Education Center 
started its new program this 
month with Clarion 
University's Earl R. Siler 
Children's Learning 

Complex. 

The program is to educate 
the Siler Complex's children 
on various kinds of health 
issues. 

The program is set to run 
from October to June 2006. 
The programs will take 
place every first Tuesday of 
the month, with the chil- 
dren traveling to the HSEC, 
then the HSEC staff travel- 
ing to the Siler Complex on 
the successive Tuesday. The 
wide range of topics to be 
discussed during the course 
of the year include growth 
and development, mental 
and emotional health, nutri- 
tion and fitness, safety, fam- 
ily life and health, disease 
prevention, consumer 

health, substance abuse, 
and community and envi- 
ronmental health. 

Associate Director of 
Programming Ron Radaker 
has high hopes for the pro- 



grams success. 

"We jointly decided on 
having our staff visit the 
Siler Center on a regular 
basis to increase the 
awareness of being 
healthy." Radaker said, 
"Starting this month and 
running through June of 
2006 we are talking with the 
children about various 
health topics that could pro- 
mote life long health as the 
children grow into adult- 
hood." 

The Siler Complex is locat- 
ed in the basement of 
Clarion University's Ralston 
Hall and has been working 
with children since its staft 



in 1990. It handles children 
from ages 15 months to 5 
years and is open to both 
students and the Clarion 
community alike. 

The HSEC is located on 
Main St. in downtown 
Clarion, and has been dedi- 
cated to educating resi- 
dents, students, and chil- 
dren since the Center's 
establishment in May 2002. 
It offers a wide range of pro- 
grams from fitness, healthy 
eating, illness, and drug and 
substance abuse. 




MeiIsM Hollier/rfie Clarion Call 
SILER COMPLEX - Siler Complex staff educates local children 
on a wide range of topics 



'SENATE' continued from 
front page. 



Also, in a 21-0-0 vote, a 
motion to approve the Real 
Estate Club as a RSO was 
approved. The organization 
is not charging dues this 
semester to try and moti- 
vate students to join. 

On Oct. 29, Clarion 
University will play host to 
a fall open house for 
prospective freshmen. The 
visitors will participate in 
events that include : a wel- 
come by the university pres- 
ident, academic program 
presentations, a university 



fair, lunch at Chandler and 
a tour of both campus and 
Reinhard Villages. 

The Safety Walk is sched- 
uled for Oct. 25 to begin at 6 
p.m. in front of public safety. 

The student senate meet- 
ing on Oct. 24 will host 
republican mayoral candi- 
date for Clarion Borough, 
John R. Stroup. The meet- 
ing will begin at 7^30 a.m. in 
246 Gemmell where Stroup 
will be available to answer 
students' questions. 

Democratic mayoral candi- 
date, Dr. Brenda Sanders 
DeDe, will be at the Nov 7 
student senate meeting. The 
meeting will begin at 8^30 



p.m. due to Social Equity 
Week Events. DeDe will also 
be answering students' 
questions. 

All students are invited to 
attend all student senate 
meetings. 

A tentative date for this 
semester's advocacy day is 
planned for Nov 8 and 9. 
The last advocacy day was 
used to generate letters 
from students, faculty, sup- 
port staff, boards and coun- 
cils, parents and grandpar- 
ents and important business 
leaders for support of addi- 
tional funding. 




Melissa Holller/T/ie Cfarfon Call 



STUDENT SENATE - Student Senate allocates funds forAGBS trip. 




The Clarion Call provides a synopsis of all criminal 
investigations as conducted by the Clarion University 
Public Safety for the month of October 2005. Ail infor- 
mation can be accessed on the PubUc Safety Web page. 

■ Oct. 15, at 10:58 p.m. university police responded to 
the fourth floor of Wilkinson Hall for a possible mari- 
juana violation; numerious items where taken from a 
room and will be sent to the crime lab to be tested. 
Charges are pending until results come back from the 
lab. Alcohol was also found in the room. 

■ Juha Nene, 18 of Erie, Pa., was staggering in Lot 8 
on service road. Female admitted to having drinking 
wine. She failed PET and was cited for underage con- 
sumption and public drunkenness. 

■ Oct. 7, at 2:21 a.m., a report of criminal mischief was 
being investigated by university police. Unknown actor 
had hit the exit sign in Wilkinson Hall with a baseball 
bat causing damage to light. Under investigation. 

■ Philip Drelick, 19, of Meadville, PA., was stopped on 
Oct. 7 by Carlson Library for staggering on the handi- 
cap sidewalk. He was very uncooperative with officers 
and was cited for public drunkness and underage con- 
sumption. 

■ CoUn Davis, age 20, was cited on Oct. 7 at 3:45 a.m., 
for underage consumption by university police while in 
Wilkinson Hall. Davis did admit to consuming alcohol 
and did have an odor of alcohol on his breath. Davis also 
failed PBT 

■ Oct. 7, at 10:13 p.m., a report of a hit and run acci- 
dent occurred in Parking Lot 11. University pohce are 
investigating. 

■ Oct. 6, unknown person(s) kicked the rear trunk area 
of a Chrysler parked in Lot P, damaging the trunk. 

■ Oct. 4, at 3:55 p.m., university police were called to 
investigate a report of harassment, of a resident of 
Givan Hall by a known actor. Criminal prosecution was 
declined by victim at this time. 



Need Help Using the LiP'iA'iv 



Do you need some help using the library? 

Come to one of Carlson Library's open sessions. 

These sessions are open to all students and 

are offered on a first-come first-served basis at the 

Level 2 Instruction Lab In Carlson Library - Room 201, 



Monday. Oct. 24th: 

10:00-10:50 - Intro to Fine Arts Research Resourceis 
4:00-4:50 - Intro to PILOT & 6eneral Periodical Databases 

Tuesday, Oct. 25th: 

10:00-11:00 - Intro to Research Resources 

in Medicine and Nursing 

3:00-4:00 - Intro to PILOT A General Periodical Databases 

Wednesday, Oct. 26th: 

3:00-3:50 - Intro to Fine Arts Research Resources 
4:00-4:50 - Intro to PILOT & General Periodical Databases 




APARTMENTS for RENT 

4-Pferson / 4-^Beclroonft 
2 & 3 - PerscNi/ Apt. Available 

utilities Inclur"-^ - Waatters & Diyers 
KMchon w^Appliances - lots ofPiarkirig 

Also. Available Fall 2005 
thru Spring 2006 





Burford & Henry Real Estate Services 

Call - (814)227-2520 for Information 

Email • kim@burfordandhenry.com 











iliiin 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex, Clarion, PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

Web: ciarioncall.ciarion.edu E-mail: call@ciarion.edu 



Executive Board 



Tom McMeekin, 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dan Edington, 
Managing Editor 

John Santa, 
News Editor 

Ashley E. Angle, 
Features Editor 

Josh Woods, 
Sports Editor 

Jeannette Good, 
Copy & Design Editor 



Melissa Holiier, 
Photography Editor 

Jamie Ranagan, 
Business Manager 

Chelsey Hummei, 
Ad Sales Manager 

Ashley Boynes, 
Advertising Designer 

Tina Sicider, 
On-line Editor 

Paul Anderson, 
Circulation Manager 



Staff 

Lone Abraham, Ryan Aloia, Ambri Alexander, Jennifer Angelos, 
Michael Balchin, Kerri Ballina, David Banks, Adam Bauer, Eddie 
Baumcratz, Jason Bice, Elisa Borger, Eric Bowser, Kurt Boyd, 
Brandi Brady, Katie Bullers, Daniel Burr, Kimberly Cammuso, 
Ashley Carter, Tyler Crieeman, Jonathan Cofer, Kevin Colonna, 
Kyan Cornman, Lisa C!ovington, Brandon Devennie, Hilary Dieter, 
Jonathan Donelli, Jeffrey Donston, Jonathan Egbert, Lori Elraquist, 
Katie Fischer, Audrey Fiske, Danielle Gais, Shawn Glancy, Lindsay 
Grystar, Grant Hermberger, Chris Hofer, Robyn Holz, Sara Hoover, 
Andy Johnson, Jennifer Kalgren, Emma Kelly. Beth Kibler, Brittnee 
Koebler, Jason Kooser, Shasta Kurtz, Joe Kuszaj, Lauren Macek, 
Michael Marcello, Chris McKissick, Nicole Meyer, Heather Moore, 
Megan Mullina, Karen Nicodemus, Cheyenne Patterson. MoUie 
Pifer, Morris Pratt, Elizabeth Presutti, Gayathri Rajendran, Zach 
Ramsey, Stephanie Rawson, Ryan Rhoades, Jeffry Richards, Sarah 
Roesch, Roberta Rosati, Lisa Sagan, Lindsey Schnieder, Jared 
Sheatz, Vicki Sheeler, Jennifer Shetter, Melody Simpson, Nathan 
Stahlman, Kristen Staley, Darrell Stanyard, Marc Steigerwald, Tom 
Steinhagen, Lindsay Sturgeon, Kirwin Sutherland, Matt Topolski, 
Steve Trichtinger, Ariel Weaver, Kevin Wetter, Pam Wherry, Amber 
White. Jimi Wikander, Ryan Wolfe, Devon Yorkshire, Jessica 
Zehnsky 

Policies 

The Chrion Call is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
Univer.sity of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
Call is pubUshed most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the 
right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; 
the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They 
must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author of a let- 
ter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter 
of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on 
available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a mem- 
ber of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricular when 
scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsibilities 
for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the Clarion 
Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One copy 
is free: additional copies are $L00. 

■ Opinions expressed in this publica- 
tion are those of the writer or speaker, 
and do not necessarily reflect the opin- 
ions of the newspaper staff, student 
body, Clarion University or the com- 
munity. 




Where did the fans go 

Last Saturday [editor's 
note: Oct. 8] it is true that 
the fighting men of our foot- 
ball team lost, but some- 
times the real story is not in 
the final score. The real 
story is how their fighting 
spirit kept on till the bitter 
end, and how the people 
who claimed to be their 
"fans" deserted them when 
it became apparent the bot- 
tom line would not be what 
they had hoped for. 

No matter how cold the 
weather got or how their 
spirits were dampened by 
rain, they would fight. 

If men were hurt the 
rest would take up the 
slack, which is what this 
team does at every game. If 
one man is hurt and can not 



play, the others have to fight 
harder to show they will not 
give up or give in. 

These men put their 
bodies on the line at each 
and every game. They fight 
almost like the warriors of 
old, who would go out on the 
battlefield and fight even if 
they lost; to the last second 
they would fight. 

The fire in their souls to 
represent this school the 
best they can was not 
quenched by the cold and 
the rain. It only took a little 
disappointment to make 
people in the Clarion stands 
leave. 

What would happen to 
the football program if the 
team up and left when at 
half time they knew they 
were in trouble? People 
would write in to newspa- 
pers calling them every 
derogatory name in the 
book. They would be called 
quitters and looked down 
upon, and 1 feel that the 
audience that left deserves 
exactly this. 



iai, llii' Fm' Press, Mm to ik Edidir and (all on loii 



By the power of Greyskull: View of cartoons changes with age 



liniifiiEMi 




Ctielsey Hummel 
Ad Sales Manager 



When I was a kid I never 
missed a Saturday morning 
power hour. I know what 
you're thinking, but I was 
five and a power hour was 
watching the back-to-back 
episodes of my two favorite 
cartoons, "He-Man: Masters 
of the Universe" and "She* 
Ra: Princess of Power," not 
drinking 60 shots of Beast 
in an hour. My desire to 
recapture something of my 
stress-free youth is the rea- 
son why I purchased a "He- 
Man" DVD last week on an 
impulse during my weekly 
Wal-Mart trip. Many people 
love the carioons they 
watched when we were lit- 
tle, but how do our views 




change when we become 
older and wiser? 

When I was five or six the 
shows I watched were so 
funny to me in such an inno- 
cent way. Somewhere in jun- 
ior high or middle school, 
however, those same shows 
became funny for completely 
different reasons. When did 
Shaggy and Scooby Doo 
become drug addicts, for 
instance? In kindergarten, 
the kids found them funny 
for constantly eating every- 
thing or getting into trouble. 
At what age did I realize the 
reason they always had the 
munchies was because they 
were stoned and that Fred 
was most likely a pimp who 
always happened to disap- 



pear with Daphne? 

Why did the meaning have 
to change? I liked being 
dumb-happy. I wish that I 
could go back to that time 
before I realized that it was 
weird and immoral for 
Smurfette to be the only girl 
in a village of horny blue 
people. Weren't the majority 
of us happy when we were 
young, before we knew that 
the world could be ugly? I 
don't know whether it's 
something that happens 
overnight or a gradual 
change that takes place over 
years, but it happens to all 
of us. 

Is it better to be unaware 
of the things around you 
and happy in your own 



world, or to lose your inno- 
cence and be corrupted by 
the world around you? 
When I see my young 
cousins, I envy their state of 
mind. The world is such a 
wonderful happy place at 
that age. There is no prob- 
lem larger than what your 
fairy godmother or neigh- 
borhood Carebear can fix. 
Then you grow up and your 
fairy godmother dies: you 
realize Tinkerbell will still 
survive even if you don't 
clap because it's only a tele- 
vision show. You realize the 
world is an unfair place 
where the good guys don't 
always win and bad things 
happen to good people. 

I'd like to find the faith in 
humanity that I had when I 
was young. The dream that 
there is always a hero wait- 
ing to save you and things 
work out for the best faded 
away over the years and I 
became cynical. As I sit 
down and watch my old car- 
toons I'm reminded of a time 
when all of life's problems 
were solved in a simple 
manner and the good of 
humanity always prevailed. 



Clarion students participate in D.C. peace rally 




Ashlee Kusciiner 

and Laura Buss 

Unless you've been living 
in a hole, you've probably 
noticed that there was a 
massive peace rally held in 
Washington, D.C. on Sept. 
24. Sprinkled throughout 
the crowd, carrying signs 
and exercising their right to 
free speech, were a number 
of Clarion University stu- 
dents. 

The older generation likes 
to call us (the younger gen- 
eration) apathetic, as if we 
don't care about the world 
around us. Yet, out of the 
hundreds of thousands of 
people who were there, a 
large percentage was made 
up of this "indifferent" gen- 
eration. Maybe it's because 
we see our best friends 
going off to countries we've 
only heard of on CNN, then 
watch in horror as they 
come back in pieces or, in 
some cases, not at all. 




■^, PEACE RALLY - Clarion students 

People have lost friends and 
family-and they're fed up. 
In the '60s, the peace move- 
ment was about youth, free 
love and avoiding the draft. 
Now it's about keeping fam- 
ilies together. 

In this century, "peace" 
has become something far 
more inclusive! more 
■ American. This peace rally 
saw something that the '60s 
never saw: entire families- 
mothers, fathers, grandpar- 
ents, children, gay, straight, 
all social demographics, all 
races, all religions, rich 
poor, middle class, democ- 
rat, republican, green and 
libertarian. It didn't matter 
who you were or where you 
came from. It all meant the 



Photo courtesy of Laura Buss 

traveled to Washington, D.C. 

same thing: we want peace, 
and we want it now. 

This picture's a lot bigger 
than the one that Fox News 
and all the other corporate- 
owned news franchises 
allow you to see. The tide is 
turning: the majority of 
Americans are now against 
the war. If you don't think 
that's the case, just think 
about this: somewhere 
between 100,000 and 
300,000 people gathered for 
peace. A meager 400 pro- 
war activists showed up on 
the Mall the next day. The 
silent majority has spoken: 
we are no longer silent-we 
want our troops home, and 
we want them home now. 

Snaking throughout the 



crowd was a line of people 
clutching a string of pic- 
tures and names: all the 
servicemen and women who 
have paid the ultimate sac- 
rifice for... well, we're not 
sure what for. There's a con- 
sensus in this country that 
it is unpatriotic to be 
against war, but what can 
be more patriotic than sup- 
porting our troops by bring- 
ing them home safe and in 
one piece? 

There are some people who 
have asked what we accom- 
plished that day, and our 
response? It doesn't matter 
if we got our message 
across. It doesn't matter 
that President Bush wasn't 
in the White House that day 
(but even if he had been, it's 
unlikely that he would have 
shown up to defend his war 
to us, the rabble). What 
really matters is that thou" 
sands of people gathered as 
a mosaic of a new America, 
one that's not afraid to 
stand up for a common 
cause. 

We have been fighting for 
too long. It's time to stop the 
killing and finally let a 
nation in mourning heal its 
wounds-together. 



Yes, the team did lose, 
but they did not give up. 
This is something that can 
not be said for most of their 
"fans." 

-John Thompson 

Newspapers and other 
sources of knowledge 

I couldn't agree more with 
Jeannette Good's article 
"Knowing Current Events is 
Critical." We have access to 
a variety of news sources, 
both in print and online. I'm 
sure there's a reason why 
we've got newspapers in 
Carlson Library. (For those 
who are enrolled in a foreign 
language class or proficient 
in another language, there 
are several foreign language 
newspapers available, too). 

While I was an undergrad- 
uate in Massachusetts, I'd 
read the "Boston Globe" on a 
regular basis. My college 
participated in a program (I 
forget the name) in which 
newspapers were delivered 
in the morning (weekdays 
only) and available for free 
at the information desk dur- 
ing the school year. Perhaps 



this is something the stu- 
dent government could look 
into. 

Go to Carlson (or the book- 
store) and pick up a newspa- 
per. There's plenty to know 
about. 

- Ehsa Babel, 
Graduate student 

Comments on column 

All I have heard for the 
last few weeks is the grow- 
ing controversy with Jason 
Bice. As I'm sure you all 
know, he has a lot of stu- 
dents in an uproar around 
campus. 

It's true that some of his 
content was questionable 
and maybe a little bit offen- 
sive ... if you don't have a 
sense of humor. As I see it, 
only knowing Bice for a few 
weeks and working with 
him at the school's TV sta- 
tion, I think he is just out to 
make people laugh. I don't 
honestly think he has a hid- 
den agenda to offend people. 
I strongly believe that peo- 
ple are blowing this way out 
of proportion. I say its time 
we all just let the storm pass 
over and get on with your 



lives. At the pace we are 
going someday we are going 
to be completely censored in 
every form of media and 
then all of these people who 
are upset will be truly 
happy. Until then there is 
always going to be some- 
body in the news or even 
school papers causing con- 
troversy, but that is what 
makes life interesting. 

In my opinion people just 
need to relax a little bit and 
just laugh at comments such 
as ones Jason Bice made! 
use your sense of humor, I 
know you got it hidden 
somewhere. 

- Nick Rimer, 
Student 

Lack of defense for 
column 

I couldn't help but notice a 
lack of defense for Jason 
Bice and his column "Sorry 
about that." First I should 
make it clear that although 
I am not a fan, I feel a col- 
umn like his is needed just 
as much as "News from The 
Fashion Club." Like it or 
not. Bice does represent one 
facet of the student body 



and his statements deserve 
to be heard like anyone 
else's in this student-run 
paper. The Call has always 
had the disclaimer that is 
now shown prominently on 
the opinions page. It is there 
to place the responsibility 
where it belongs on the 
shoulders of the writer. 

Now I should console Bice 
and inform him that he is in 
good company. He is part of 
that great tradition that 
includes: Harriet Beecher 
Stowe, Salmon Rushdie, 
Gerard Damiano and Joe 
Esterhaus (if you don't know 
who these people are look 
them up and draw your own 
conclusion). Luckily no one 
has put out a death warrant 
on Mr. Bice's head, but some 
seem to have come close. 

One final thought: rela- 
tions between CU students 
and locals have always had 
a dark undercurrent to 
them (I can personally 
attest that it goes back at 
least 20 years). I don't 
believe that anything done 
by The Call (positive or neg- 
ative) is going to make much 
of a difference. 

- Von G. Winger 



■i^^ 



Page_4 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



October 20. 2005 



October 20. 2005 



TIffi CLARION CALL 



Page 5 







4 



4r 



Ashley Boynes 
Advertising Designer 

s_amboynes@clarlon,edu 



Don't Judge me 
(or anyone) 

To avoid sounding preachy, I'll be frank. Do not judge 
people that you do not know. Do not judge me. Do not 
judge the people in your classes, at the mall, at your 
place of employment. 

Always keep in mind that people may have circum- 
stances unbeknownst to you. If you do not know all the 

details of how someone 
feels, do not assume. Do 
not judge people's lives 
that you know absolutely 
nothing about. If you do 
not know someone's pres- 
ent situationCs), let alone 
their past, do not criticize 
or stereotype. 

Maybe someone keeps to 
their self because they are 
shy, not because they are 
stuck up. Maybe some- 
body is self-conscious of 
their body because they 
suffered emotional or ver- 
bal abuse, not because 
they are self-obsessed, 
shallow or want attention. 
Maybe that girl that you 
think is a bitch is really the nicest person you would 
ever want to meet ... but you were too busy judging her 
to take the time to get to know her. Maybe that guy is 
gay ... but maybe he is your potential best friend, too, 
if you would just look past that label. 

Maybe people who seem to preach their religion or 
political beliefs just want to share something that they 
are enthusiastic about - they probably are not overly 
concerned if they "convert" you. Maybe some people do 
not dress nice, or they carry impostor designer bags 
because they cannot afford the "real deal." Maybe 
someone is hurting inside, and you are too busy being 
selfish and too judgmental to open your eyes and look. 
I'm sure you have your share of problems, too. So 
keep your problems in mind, and know that, while you 
are busy judging others, someone may be judging your 
problems, and your life, too! Some people do not want 
pitied, but they are waiting for someone to reach out 
to them. Some people do not want other people know- 
ing their problems, but maybe just seek a friend. 

I do not go out as much as some of my peers. This is 
because I am not feeling well due to a chronic illness, 
or because I would rather use my money for other 
things. It is not because I am anti-social or do not 
want to hang out with friends. I keep to myself some- 
times. I am sort of an introvert until I get to know peo- 
ple. I do not think this means I am stuck up, and it 
certainly does not mean that I am not a fun, kind and 
loving person. 

I have had many experiences in life where friends of 
mine have been judged, too. I see these situations first 
hand every day and can envision even more that I do 
not even witness firsthand. A girl who goes to a "rich" 
school, and because she was not as wealthy, gets 
looked down upon. A girl who shops at thrift stores - 
because that's what she can afford. A black man in a 
mostly-white ivy-league college. A male figure skater. 
A female who enjoys deerhunting. That guy who 
never finished college. The woman at work who looks 
strung out every day. Maybe she is just stressed, or 
tired! Or what about the kid on the high school foot- 
ball team who is the slowest of all, overweight and 
gets teased by his teammates. They may be joking, but 
some people take this teasing to heart. These are all 
realistic situations of people facing judgments and 
stereotypes, by others who are no better than them. 

So I ask you all to judge yourselves before you judge 
anyone else. Look in the mirror and until YOU are 
perfect, keep your judgments and your opinions on 
others to yourself. 



Senioritis will kill us all (We are not alone) 



Paul Anderson 
Circulation Manager 

s_pmanderson@cljirion,eclu 

For my 22nd hirtlulay last 
month, I got a scrapbook 
containing almost every 
copy of The Dumping 
(Jround I'd written since I 
was a sophomore, complete 
with httle pictures (loogled 
from the Internet of objects 
or people referenced in the 
specific columns. It took 
three months to make, give 
or take, I've been told, and 
the effort shows — I've been 
given a lot of great things 
for my birthday over the 
years, but that one takes the 
cake. There are those out 
there reading this thinking 
that a better gift would be to 
burn all those columns 
because they aren't worth 
the paper they're printed on, 
but f*ck 'em (don't you love 
asterisks?). Shouldn't you be 
turning the page now? 

Anyway, it was interesting 
to see how far I've come in 
the past three years. From 
writing about why zealous 
non-smokers irritate the 
hell out of me, to Wal-Mart 
(the fact that I worked their 
as a cashier after writing 
that article is an irony not 
lost on me), to talking about 
hc" A.L.F. is nothing more 
than celebration of death. 
The pictui •=■ that went along 
with the columns were the 




least to change: from a 
headshot with my head 
turned down (I had a scar of 
a pimple on my chin that I 
thought was glaringly obvi- 
ous) to me leaning against 
the logo wearing a shirt that 
read I DO ALL OF MY 
OWN STUNTS to me in 
bear slippers and a tie. 

Whatever. You're probably 
wondering why I've devoted 
so much time to a scrapbook 
that, to anyone else, is just a 
bunch of random articles 
glued in. It's just that I've 
realized how much I've 
"grown up" in the past four 
years. If the IS-yearold me 
could meet the 22-year-old 
me, the IS-yearold would 
kick the 22-year-old's ass (or 
try to — I'm stronger than I 
was when I was 18) and the 
scrapbook signifies that for 
me. 

In a few short months, 
we'll all be in ceremonial 
robes, getting a piece of 
paper from the Dean or 
President or whoever the 
hell it is that hands out the 



diplomas and shakes our 
hand, and we'll all be gradu- 
ates! for the most part done 
with schooling for the rest of 
our lives. It's kind of a 
shaky, anxious idea. 

We've been indoctrinated 
to think that once that 
diploma slips into our 
hands, we're cut loose, away 
from the support system 
that we've grown accus- 
tomed to and worked with. 
We're on our own, friends 
and neighbors, and we are 
entirely responsible for our- 
selves. 

But that's such a lie. We're 
never alone, not entirely. If 
you think about it, we'll all 
still have our network of 
friends and family to help us 
through the troubled times. 
Over the course of the past 
four or five years, depending 
on who's reading this, we've 
watched friends and 
acquaintances enroll in col- 
lege and drop out. At orien- 
tation, the speakers may 
have had you look around as 
they told you that the people 



next to you won't make it to 
graduation. And it's true. 
How many people can you 
name that dropped out, 
flunked out or just disap- 
peared? The number's 
frightening, when you stop 
to think about it. 

But we made it, friends 
and neighbors. We've made 
friends and partners here 
that, hopefully, will endure 
long past graduation, until 
we're old and senile. That's 
our support system. These 
are the people that, when 
troubled times fall, will be 
right there to help us 
through it. Maybe not phys- 
ically, but through a tele- 
phone, an e-mail or a hasti- 
ly planned flight. 

Take a look around. In a 
few months, we'll be grown 
ups. The cycle has complet- 
ed. And we'll all start fami- 
lies and careers and have 
children that will perpetu- 
ate the cycle further. You've 
come along way, baby. 

That's what the scrapbook, 
beyond the memories of 
scribbling these mostly 
worthless columns, means 
to me. I can see the friends 
I've gained and lost over the 
course of that time. Who 
knew nostalgia could be so 
depressing? 

No jokes this week and no 
punchline, either. Just a 
question" So, how are you 
holding up? 




Community should 
focus on more 
pressing issues 

For the past few weeks, 
nearly enough space to fill 
half a Clarion Call has been 
taken up by the letters to 
the editor about Mr. Jason 
Bice. My question to the 
campus community is why 
not focus on more pressing 
issues? 

I found the article that 
Clarion Call staff writer 
John Santa wrote, entitled 
"Some Concerned French 
Language Major in Danger 
After Cuts" more disturbing 
than any of Mr. Bice's ranti- 
ngs. The article details 
budget cuts and the loss of 
faculty members, something 
which every department on 
campus is feeling right now. 
I give props to Dr. Spina for 
being the first to speak out 



using the Clarion Call as an 
outlet. However, there is 
much more to the story than 
what is discussed within the 
small news clip. 

Here is a question for 
Clarion^ how did the State 
System of Higher Education 
over-allocate Two Million 
dollars to our facility? More 
importantly, how did 
Clarion University SPEND 
it? Where exactly did that 
money go? The only new 
buildings I see are the vil- 
lages. As I served as a 
Student Senator in the past 
it was explained to the 
board the reasoning behind 
constructing that "commu- 
nity-away-from-campus" 
known as Reinhard 
Villages. Campbell Hall was 
being shut down due to an 
outdated building that was 
not up to building codes. It 
was also confirmed that 
Campbell hall was going to 
be immediately demolished 
to make way for parking for 
faculty. Well, two years later 
and big-old-beautiful 

Campbell still towers over 
Gemmell because our uni- 
versity didn't factor in the 



cost for leveling the struc- 
ture. 

One of Clarion's primary 
focuses as I served my three 
year Student Senate term 
was enrollment. The prob- 
lem continues, not only in 
the French Department, but 
all over campus. Clarion 
cuts faculty. Clarion cuts 
choice and opportunity for 
its students. Clarion cuts 
opportunity for its students, 
then, in my eyes, we're cut- 
ting our own enrollment. 

Dr. Spina, you're right, 
this university is hurting 
and it is being run like a 
business. Unfortunately, the 
affects are hurting students 
just as much as faculty 
members. Why would a 
French Major enroll at a 
university that only offers 
one French professor? 
Communication faculty 
members were cut, and now 
we have oversized classes 
due to the leftovers. Yet 
another choice and opportu- 
nity for the students pushed 
away due to budget cuts. 

So the next time you want 
to get upset about some- 
thing and write in to the 



call, make it worth while. 
You might just stumble 
across some interesting tid- 
bits of information like, 
while budget cuts are hap- 
pening all across campus! 
they stop at Provost Nolan 
and President Grunenwald's 
door, because they are guar- 
anteed a pay increase everv 
year . You just might be sur- 
prised at how many faculty 
members could be saved just 
from those funds. Then, 
when students decide to 
write in about something, 
send it to: 

Chancellor Judy G. Hample 

PA State System of Higher 

Education 

2986 North Second Street 

Harrisburg, pa 17110 

And let her know how you 
would like to re-earmark the 
allocations so it benefits 
you. I mean it's only your 
money, education and future 
after all. 

- Mark J. Zmitravich, 
Student 




Kyle Rakiecki 

Junior, Earth and Space Science 

"A dead man." 




Sara Hoover 
and Jenna Angelos 

What costume will 
you be wearing 
for Halloween 
this year?" 




Eric Molnar 

Freshman, Math Education 

"Jason from L.B." 





Kristin Faux 

Sophomore, Biology 

"A Bunny." 



Ml ATA SHERIKF 

Sophomore, Chemistry 
"Catwomen." 




Jon Hoburg 

Sophomore, Business 

"Howard Stern." 



Nicole Ritchie 

Sophomore, Psychology 

"A mouse." 







Mtms 



Martin shares stories of liardsliips, race discrimination 



Ariel Weaver 

aarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Oct. 18 - At 
7:30 p.m. the Hart Chapel 
auditorium was full. It was- 
n't for a play, or a production 
done by the dance team, and 
it wasn't for a class; it was 
for "True Colors: Reshaping 
Our Attitudes about Race 
and Ethnicity," presented by 
Joe Martin. 

The presentation started 
off with a brief introduction 
of Joe Martin. Martin is a 
professor at the University 
of West Florida, named one 
of the top motivational pro- 
fessors in America and also 
named one of Who's Who 
Among American Teachers. 
He currently holds a stu- 
dent reality talk show and 
has published many books. 

After Martin was intro- 
duced he came right up onto 
the stage and started with a 
poem about race. He wrote 
the poem, "My Skin, Your 
Skin," when he was 13 years 
old. Before explaining what 
the poem was about Martin 
gave a little look into his life 
story. 

Martin grew up in one of 
the toughest projects in the 



U.S., Liberty City in Miami. 
His mom was 16 years old 
when she had him. His dad 
left when he was two years 
old. He had lost six friends 
by the age of 16, and had 
seen everything from his 
own mother being held at 
gun point to her trying to 
drink herself to death at 
night. In middle school 
Martin would sometimes be 
solicited by prostitutes, and 
for three years of his life he 
was sexually abused by a 
male role model in his life. 
After all of this tragedy and 
hardships he said, "I'm still 
here." 

"I start off with this poem 
to set the tone, I thought it 
would be a good way to 
make this program a lot eas- 
ier, because to be honest I 
never do programs like 
this," said Martin. "I know 
that all of you are probably 
thinking that was just your 
every day poem about race, 
but really there is a story 
behind it, a day that 
changed my life forever," 
said Martin. 

At the age of 13, Martin 
witnessed a crowd beat a 
young white man and killed 
him with the butt of an axe. 



Ashley E. Angle 
Features Editor 



Mother, teacher, business 
owner, author and student 
are all accomplishments 
Pegg Watts-Cartwright, 46, 
has under her belt. What 
makes her unique? She's 
accomplished all these 
things despite being legally 
bhnd. 

Watts-Cartwright was 
born with retinitis pigmen- 
tosa, or RR 

"It's a hereditary degener- 
ative eye disease of the reti- 
na," she said, putting it sim- 
ply- 

According to Yahoo! 
health, RP causes side 
vision to gradually decrease 
and is eventually lost, but 
central vision usually stays 
until the end stages. 

The degeneration happens 
at different rates for each 
person. 

"I could wake up tomor- 
row and be blind," Watts- 
Cartwright said, "or I can 
stay right where I'm at for 
the next 20 years." 

Adjusting to that fact was 
not easy. 

"It used to scare me 
because I didn't like my per- 
ception of blind people," she 
said. "I didn't want to be 
treated as a blind person." 

Being blind does not only 
mean the loss of sight, but 
also the loss of anonymity. 
Watts-Cartwright knows 
she can't go anywhere with- 
out being noticed because 
she uses a cane to get 
around. 

"It's frustrating," she said. 
"If I wanted to be noticed I 
would wear a funny hat." 

A Confusing Childhood 

Watts-Cartwright is origi- 
nally from the Queens area 
of Long Island, N.Y. and is 
the oldest of five children. 
Her childhood was "confus- 
ing and dysfunctional." 
Watts-Cartwright's parents 
divorced when she was very 
young. At first, the children 
were split up and lived with 
grandparents, and after 
that they lived with their 
mother. 

"My life was inconsistent," 
said Watts-Cartwright. 

Her mother was abusive 
when she drank and when 



she lost her temper. 

"You think there's got to 
be something wrong with 
you to have someone treat 
you that way," she said. 

Watts-Cartwright's rela- 
tionship with her father 
was non-existent at first, 
but reconnected with him 
around the age of 18. 

As a teenager, Watts- 
Cartwright ran away eight 
to 10 times. 

"It wasn't just running 
away to a friend's house," 
she said. "It was like run- 
ning away to Utah." 

However, every time she 
ran away she would feel 
guilt. As the oldest of five 
she felt she needed to take 
on the burden, and when 
she ran away she wasn't 
there to protect her younger 
siblings. 

As a runaway, Watts- 
Cartwright was using pot 
and LSD and discovered 
that the only way to survive 
was to participate in illegal 
activities. 

"I was running towards 
something that was missing 
inside," Watts-Cartwright 
said of being a runaway. "I 
wanted to make my life bet- 
ter, but it was turning out 
worse." 

Watts-Cartwright decided 
to check herself into a resi- 
dential treatment program, 
Seabury Barn, on Long 
Island, for her behavioral 
issues. She cites this as the 
main turning point in her 
life. While at Seabury Barn, 
Watts-Cartwright learned 
that her mother's behavior 
had nothing to do with her. 
The counselors made her 
get her GED and started to 
talk to her about going to 
college. 

Great Strides 

"Living a life that is less 
than you deserve is your 
choice," said Watts- 
Cartwright. "I chose to do 
something else with my 
life." 

"The thing I'm most proud 
of is being a mom," she said. 
Watts-Cartwright feels that 
the "dysfunctional crazi- 
ness" stopped with her and 
there was no violence in her 
household. 

Watts-Cartwright had two 
children, moved back to 
New York from California, 




Morris Pratt/ rfte Ciarton Call 

JOE MARTIN - Joe Martin presented "True Colors: Reshaping 
Our Attitudes about Race and Ethnicity" on Tuesday, Oct. 18. 



"Blood went everywhere, 
including all of our faces. I 
was traumatized and that is 
a day I'll never forget," 
Martin said. 

Martin said he needed 
some form of therapy after 
the event, so he turned to 
writing. He was angry and 
confused about the situation 
so he let all of it out in his 
poem, "My Skin, Your Skin." 
As it turned out earlier that 
week a black man was 



pulled over by a couple of 
white cops and was said to 
have resisted arrest so the 
cops continued to beat him 
until he died; this man 
turned out to be a pastor of 
one of the largest churches 
in Miami. This was the 
beginning of the Liberty 
City Riots, which consisted 
of burning buildings, mur- 
ders and rioting. That 
Saturday morning hap- 
pened because the people of 



Liberty City believed that 
killing the white man would 
serve them justice. 

Martin knew he had to 
move on from this situation 
and learn and grow from it. 
He eventually attended The 
University of West Florida, 
which at the time had less 
then five percent minorities 
students. He ended up being 
the only African American 
in all of his classes. 
Eventually he needed a 
roommate to live with in an 
apartment, but when he 
answered the ads everyone 
would turn him down 
because of his skin color. 
Eventually, he found a per- 
son that didn't matter to, 
this man was a white man 
from Alabama; however, not 
only would this man become 
his roommate for the next 
two years, but he would 
become his life long best 
friend and the Godfather to 
his child. 

Living with this man was 
probably the best thing for 
both of them because they 
both realized why race is a 
problem in this world. 
Martin explained that there 
are five reasons why race is 
a problem in the world and 



they were: everyone has 
anger and hostility, fear and 
insecurities, ignorance, the 
media stereotypes and peer 
pressure. Everyone is prej- 
udice, he said, because we 
all pre-judge people, there is 
not one person out there 
who hasn't pre-judged some- 
one. 

"We as a society need to 
open up our eyes, cut TV off, 
don't let it affect us as much, 
because we are letting the 
media dictate what we do," 
said Martin. He continued, 
"We also need to not take 
everything so offensively." 

"This world is like a jigsaw 
puzzle, it can't all be the 
same, every piece must be 
different to create the beau- 
tiful picture," said Martin. 

Martin ended the presen- 
tation the same way he 
started it, with a poem that 
he wrote. Only this poem 
was for his friend serving 
triple life in prison. 

"I thought the speaker was 
really good, it made me feel 
really inspired; and yeah, I 
think we should have more 
presentations like it," said 
sophomore Jill Torchia. 



got a divorce, remarried and 
lost her second husband in 
a car accident - all by the 
time she was 30. At the 
same time she was going 
through a series of eye sur- 
geries; she had been 
declared legally bhnd at 19. 
However, she made great 
strides during this time, 
earning a degree in Special 
Education from 

Stoney brook College. 

More Changes 

After losing her second 
husband, Watts-Cartwright 
took her children and 
moved to Connecticut, 
where she ran The 
Learning Circle, a daycare 
with 22 employees and 120 
children. Two years later, 
the daycare burned down 
due to an arson fire. Watts- 
Cartwright rebuilt it and 
sold it. 

Because of an arrange- 
ment made when she 
divorced from her first hus- 
band, their children moved 
with their father to finish 
high school. 

Being half Cherokee, 
Watts-Cartwright jumped 
at the chance to move to the 
Cattaraugus Seneca 

Reservation when asked by 
friends. She lived there 
from 1995-1997. She said 
reservation living is not 
much different from living 
in a suburb or any other 
town in America. 

"They want satellite TV 
and SUVs like everyone 
else," said Watts- 

Cartwright. 

After hving on the reser- 
vation, her mother offered 
Watts-Cartwright a job with 
her in Florida. She was 
skeptical about working 
with her mother at first, but 
then decided to go for it. 

"I wanted more positive 
interaction and memories 
between us," said Watts- 
Cartwright, explaining on 
how she made the final 
decision to move to Florida. 
A few years after moving 
to Florida, Watts- 

Cartwright decided to move 
to Buffalo, N.Y. to be closer 
to her son as he started col- 
lege. 

After her son finished col- 
lege and after she married 
for a third time, Watts- 
Cartwright and her hus- 




band moved to Arizona, 
where she taught special 
education classes. During 
that time, she had to stop 
teaching due to a drastic 
change in her eye sight. 
Because of a transfer in her 
husband's job, Watts- 
Cartwright ended up in 
Clarion. She and her hus- 
band have now been sepa- 
rate for over a year and are 
in the process of a divorce. 

"Chasing Venus" 

So that's her whole story, 
right? Wrong. Watts- 
Cartwright is also a pub- 
lished author and it was her 
book that ultimately led her 
to take classes at Clarion 
University. Watts- 

Cartwright's book "Chasing 
Venus" was published in 
August 2004. The book is a 
coming of age story that 
takes place in the 1970s. 

"It's about coming in to 
your own and realizing 
you're okay," she said. 

Watts-Cartwright got the 
idea for the book after tak- 
ing a cross country road trip 
with a friend. The book, 
being somewhat of an auto- 
biography, forced Watts- 
Cartwright to revisit and 
come to terms with things 
in her past. She said that 
growing up she felt the 
things that went on in her 
life had to be a secret, that 
they had happened to her, 
and only her. Through feed- 



back from readers, Watts- 
Cartwright came to learn 
that she wasn't alone. 

"Unfortunately, it's more 
common to come from a 
family with problems than 
from that Beaver Cleaver 
family," she said. 

Moving Into Broadcast 

Doing PR for the book 
comes along with having it 
published. Watts- 

Cartwright appeared on 
"Good Morning America" 
and also on other television 
and radio programs in 
Florida and New York. 

By doing PR for the book 
Watts-Cartwright was able 
to see that "radio is a great 
medium for blind people." 

The Office of Vocational 
Rehabilitation in 

Pittsburgh offered her the 
chance to go back to school. 
Watts-Cartwright decided 
she wanted to learn to do 
broadcasting and also to 
learn how to write for 
broadcast. She is currently 
enrolled at Clarion 
University as a full-time, 
non-traditional student 
majoring in communication. 
Because of general educa- 
tion requirement credits 
from her previous educa- 
tion, Watts-Cartwright will 
be able to receive her degree 
in two years. 

She hosts her own show 
on WCUC, the campus 
radio station, from noon to 3 



p.m. on Sundays. Her show, 
"Sunday Brunch with the 
Hippie," offers different seg- 
ments such as "e-mails you 
love to hate" and "the vibe," 
which is a take off of The 
View's "Hot Topics" seg- 
ment. She also plays classic 
rock and San Francisco psy- 
chedelic rock music. 

"The best part is that I get 
to share my crazy thought 
patterns with unsuspecting 
people," said Watts- 
Cartwright. 

WCUC has made some 
changes to accommodate 
Watts-Cartwright. They 
placed raised dots on the 
control panel, added a 
closed circuit television in 
order to make the scripts 
bigger and gave her more 
individuahzed training. 

Watts-Cartwright lives in 
Givan Hall in a medical sin- 
gle. She doesn't like having 
to share a bathroom and 
misses having a kitchen, 
but said she doesn't mind 
living with the younger stu- 
dents, citing that they all 
have been "really nice" to 
her. 

So, what's next? First, 
Watts-Cartwright plans to 
move off campus in 
December. She also has 
three books in the works 
that she would like to get 
back to after graduating 
from Clarion University in 
Spring 2007. 



.4 



Page 6 



THE CLAMOR CALL 



October 20. 2005 



Spotlight On: The Mark Ferrari Duo 



Pittsburgh-based duo plays both covers and originals 



Ashley Boynes 
Advertising Designer 

The Mark Ferrari Duo of 
Pittsburgh, Pa. is a local 
band with supersized talent 
that t'ormed in the summer 
of 2004. This duo, consisting 
of Mark Ferrari and Todd 
My rah, plays an eclectic mix 
of rock, country covers and 
originals. There may only be 
two of them, but when one 
hears them play, it is great- 
ly understood why the need 
for drums and other instru- 
ments or vocalists is unnec- 
essary. They fill the room 
with a powerful sound and 
engage the audience with 
smooth vocals and impres- 
sive acoustics. 

Mark Ferrari, lead 
singer/songwriter and 

rhythm guitar player, as 
well as founder of the duo, 
formed the band after real- 
izing his passion for singing. 
He has been performing 
since the age of 16. When he 
was younger, he performed 
in school musicals and acap- 
pella groups, and won the 
legendary "Mr. lUP" pag- 
eant at the Indiana 
University of Pa. due to his 
soulful rendition of the Tony 
Rich Project's "Nobody 
Knows." After this, he 
recorded some demos with 
local Pittsburgh producers 
and began his search for a 
bandmate. 

Ferrari writes many of his 
own songs, and in his soul- 
bearing lyrics, leaves his 




Photo Illustration: Shasta Kurt^T'fie Clarion Call 

The Mark Farrari Duo - Mark Ferrari and Todd Myrah make up the Pittsburgh, Pa. based band, The Mark Ferrari Duo. The group 
plays an eclectic mix of rock and country covers. 



heart and soul hanging out 
for all to witness. He is a 
school teacher by day and a 
singer/songwriter by night. 
His personal influences 
include Edwin McCain, Jon 
Bon Jovi, Bryan Adams and 
more. His goal is to be suc- 
cessful, one way or another, 
in the music industry. He is 
working with local produc- 
ers on cutting a mini-album 
and feels that his ability to 
write, arrange, and perform 
truly raise him above other 
local talent and many of his 
fans would agree. 



Todd Myrah, rhythm/lead 
guitarist and vocalist for the 
Mark Ferrari Duo, has 
played guitar since the age 
of eight. During his teens, 
he was in many other suc- 
cessful Pittsburgh bands 
such as Inner Fate, Reign 
and Gram Vogel. His band 
Reign opened for artists like 
REO Speedwagon and Ted 
Nugent and also cut an 
album at the time. Through 
the years, he has become 
acquainted with the music 
industry both on stage and 
behind the scenes. He went 



to college for music business 
and got to tour with bands 
such as Double Trouble, 
Alter Bridge (formerly 
known as Creed), Johnny 
Lang and Submersed. He 
also wrote and composed 
music for a nationally tele- 
vised TV commercial. 

Myrah has experience 
working with music man- 
agement companies and 
also has experienced touring 
as a tech/merchandising 
guy. His true passion, how- 
ever, is playing guitar and 
singing, and finding Mark 



Models provided for figure drawingolass 



Kevin Wetter 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 



In figure drawing art 
classes offered at Clarion 
University, students get the 
opportunity to sketch 
human models. These mod- 
els may be clothed, partial- 
ly clothed or nude. It all 
depends on the drawing. 

WHAT ARE THE 
REQUIREMENTS? 

Anyone who wants to be a 
model can sign up. The 
models then work during 
the figure drawing classes. 

At the beginning of class, 
models usually hold each 
pose for about 30 seconds 
for a total modeling time of 
45 minutes. The students 
do gesture drawings with 
this type of modeling. 

"Gesture drawings are 
quick, short sketches," said 
Melissa Kuntz, assistant 
professor of painting. 

The majority of the class 
usually focuses on longer 
drawings. According to 
Kuntz, the better models 
are ideal for this. 

"Some of our better mod- 
els are able to stand still for 
half an hour which is ideal 
for making longer draw- 
ings," Kuntz said. 

The models are asked to 
come up with a variety of 
poses quickly. This is ideal 
for gesture drawings 
because gesture drawings 
focus on body movements 
and gestures. 

Models receive an hourly 
wage. They get paid $8 an 
hour for clothed, $9 an hour 
for partially clothed and 
$10 an hour for nude. The 
reason they receive more 
money for being nude Is 
because there are few stu- 
dents that are actually will- 
ing to stand in front of the 
class naked. 



WHAT IS IT LIKE TO 

BE A MODEL? IS IT 

CHALLENGING? 

Brad Harrington is a sen- 
ior acting major and models 
for the figure drawing class- 
es. Harrington first attend- 
ed Edinboro University 
because of their art depart- 
ment and then transferred 
to Clarion University. 

Harrington strictly does 
nude modeling because he 
does not find it embarrass- 
ing. 

"The first couple of times 
I was a little uncomfort- 
able, but after awhile I did- 
n't even notice. I just look at 
it as taking off my clothes; I 
do it at some point in the 
day no matter what any- 
way," Harrington said. 

"It was a lot more work 
than I thought. You have to 
come up with several poses 



in a short amount of time," 
said Harrington. 

Harrington only models 
three or four times a semes- 
ter, but said the money is 
still good. 

WHAT DO 

STUDENTS GET 

OUT OUT OF OR 

LEARN FROM 

DRAWING LIVE 

MODELS? 

Kuntz said, "It is better 
exercise for the drawing 
students to work from a 
nude model because it is 
imperative that they get 
the drawing right; they 
can't cover their mistakes 
by drawing the clothes on 
the model." 

"From a technical point it 
teaches me how to draw the 
human figure. It's different 
from a regular art class 




Melissa Holifer/The Clarion Call 
ART MODELS - The figure drawing classes take place in 
Marwick-Boyd. Students draw models who stanflf in front of the 
class either clothed, semi-clothed or nude. 



5 becau^ we get to draw live 
models," said Ashley 
,,Caggiano-Gaio, a senior 
^focusing on a Bachelor's 
''degree in fine arts with a 
concentration in fabric sur- 
face design and a member 
of the figure drawing I 
class. 

"Drawing the figure is not 
very forgiving. If the stu- 
dent doesn't get the scale 
? and proportion right then it 
is obvious there is some- 
thing wrong with the draw- 
ing," said Kuntz. 

WHAT IF THERE 

ISN'T A MODEL FOR 

THAT DAY? 

Due to budget cuts there 
. is not always a model pro- 
vided for the class. 

"There's not much I don't 
like about the class, except 
we don't have models every- 
day because of the budget," 
Caggiano-Gaio said. 

When there is not a 
model in class, the students 
often draw from slides. 

"One class, when it was 
nice out, we went outside 
and did gesture drawings of 
people walking by," said 
Caggiano-Gaio. 

HOW MANY 

MODELS ARE 

NEEDED FOR EACH 

CLASS? 

There are six levels of the 
figure drawing class, but 
they are stacked. A stacked 
class means that all six lev- 
els of the class take place in 
the same room at the same 
time. 

"Most of the studio class- 
es in the art department 
are run this way," 
Caggiano-Gaio said. 

Because the classes are 
stacked, only one model is 
needed for each class period 
in which thev will be used. 



in a city paper ad gave him 
the opportunity to continue 
his passion onstage. He 
names his musical influ- 
ences as Robbie Williams, 
Oasis, Seal, Sting, Howie 
Day, Coldplay and Tonic. He 
is truly the yin to Ferrari's 
yang, making this duo a 
smashing success. 

Together, these two make 
magic onstage. Their unique 
abilities, personalities, 
styles and vocal sounds 
make them a truly harmon- 
ic duo. They cover everyone 
from Goo Goo Dolls, Bon 



Jovi, U2, Tom Petty, Maroon 
5, Matchbox 20, 3 Doors 
Down, Lifehouse, Kenny 
Chesney, Keith Urban, Tim 
McGraw and more. They 
also do Ferrari's original 
songs which include^ "Meant 
To Be," "All She Needs," 
"Anymore." "Different Kind 
of Blue" and "Letting Go." 
All of the originals that they 
play are written by Ferrari, 
but at times Myrah will add 
his own httle touches here 
and there to the song. 
Myrah also composes and 
writes his own songs on the 
side. Their fan base is a con- 
sistent one, mostly friends 
and family at the current 
time, but is steadily grow- 
ing. They have performed at 
such venues as Red Star at 
Station Square, Rhythm 
House, Nick's Fat City, 
South Side Works, RPM's, 
Scooby's, the Baltimore 
House, Good Times, Sieb's 
Irish Pub and more. 

Both hope to cut a CD, 
become successful in the 
music industry, keep on 
playing and living their 
dreams. With their good 
looks, musical talent and 
their growing positive repu- 
tation, the Mark Ferrari 
Duo appears to have a 
bright future ahead. 

The Mark Ferrari Duo's 
gigs can be seen at various 
venues in Pittsburgh, Pa. 
They also hope to expand 
their fan base and hopefully 
perform some university 
shows. 




Josh Pierce 
and Amanda Goe 



^me myths 

about 

Greek life at CUP 

Some common myths about 
Greek life^ 

1. Myth: You are buying 
your Mends. 

Fact: The money that mem- 
bers pay for dues actually 

goes toward national dues ■ ■ ■" ' ■"" 

to keep chapters in good standing with their national 
organizations. The money also goes toward local chapter 
operations such as recruitment events, A.L.F. float mate- 
rials, keeping a chapter house in working order and pay- 
ing for composites. Many organizations do fundraisers to 
lighten the jSnancial burden of individual dues, but the 
fact remains that without these funds organizations 
would not be able to operate at a respectable level. 

2. Myth* The only thing that Greeks do is drink and 
party. 

Pact: Though some members choose to participate in a 
party atmosphere, partying is not all that Greeks do. 
Every Gfeek organization at Clarion participates in 
some form of community service. Sororities and fraterni- 
ties have sisterhood and brotherhoods where they do a 
fun activity as a group. Individual members also partici- 
pate in a wide variety of university organizations such as 
athletics, student senate, UAB and other campus wide 
groups. 

3. Myth: All Greeks have low GPAs. 

Pact: The Greeks at Clarion are expected to maintain a 
specific GPA as both individuals and as an organization. 
In fact many Greek organizations have a minimum GPA 
requirement for membership. We are encouraged to do 
study hours and help our fellow brothers and sisters with 
course work. 

4. Myth: The only way to be initiated to a Greek organi- 
zation is to be hazed. 

Pact: Hazing is an illegal activity. Those caught hazing 
are subject to criminal charges which can include, but 
are not limited to, expulsion from school or even being 
arrested. It can be cause for removal of a Greek chapter 
and Clarion University does not tolerate it in any fash- 
ion. 

Of course there are several other myths associated with 
Greek life. There will always be groups that go down the 
wrong path, but majority of Greek letter organizations 
are established on and pride themselves on the idea of a 
positive lifelong connection. If you have any questions 
concerning the practices of Greek organizations at 
Clarion, feel free to ask any of the members of the 
Panhellenic Council or the Interfraternity Council. They 
would be more than happy to speak to you. 



October 20, 2005 



rm CLARION CALL 



PafleT 









ASK 
WCrWIK 



Dear Dr. Eagle, 

One of ray good friends 
has been acting different 
lately. I know she was 
dating this guy that we 
didn't like, but all of a 
sudden she stopped talk- 
ing to him. I am con- 
cerned that something 
happened to her and she 
won't tell any of us. Do 
you have any advice that 
I can use to help her out? 
Signed, 
Concerned 

Dear Concerned, 

VS/hen you try talking to 
your friend about what is 
going on with her, she 
may be reluctant to tell 
you anything. Tell her 
that you are here if she 
needs someone to talk to 
and that you will help her 
in any way that you can. 
Here are some tips that 
may help you when you 
talk to her. 

Rape is when someone 
forces you to have sex 
with him or her. The per- 
son can be a stranger or 
someone you know. A 
common rape among col- 
lege students is date and 
acquaintance rape. Date 
rape occurs by a person 
that you are currently 
dating and can happen 
the first time that you go 
out or after several dates. 
Acquaintance rape is 
when someone you know, 
but are not necessarily 
dating, rapes you. 

Everyone has the right 
to say no to sex. Even if 
they have b^n kissing or 
someone is dressed in a 
sexy way. If you have had 
iex with the fierson 
before, you still have the 
right to tell them no. If 
someone is too drunk or 
high to say no it is still 
rape. No ALWAYS means 
no, regardless of the cir- 
cumstances. Remind your 
friend that it was not her 
fault. 

If a rape did occur, your 
friend may be emotional- 
ly devastated. She may 
blame herself for the inci- 
dent. All you can do is 
offer to be there for her. It 
may take a long time to 
trust people again, espe- 
cially if the rape was done 
by someone she knew. 
The main thing you can 
do for your friend is just 
listen, but at the same 
time encourage her to 
seek help. She can talk to 
her family, her doctor or a 
counselor. You can also 
encourage her to join the 
self'defense class that is 
offered by Public Safety. 
Tell her that you are 
interested in the class 
and you would Uke to go 
with her. 

Doctor Eagle is written 
by Sarah Wilaon of the 
Keeling Health Center. 
For more information or 
to suggest a topic, please 
contact her at s_smml- 
son@clarion.edu 




Stem cell research remains topic In science world 



Grant Herrnberger 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Stem cell research is a 
topic circulating through 
the science world. The 
research focusing around 
stem cells is a look into the 
future of science. Stem cells 
can be used to generate 
healthy and functioning 
specialized cells, which can 
then replace diseased or 
dysfunctional cells. 

Most of the body's special- 
ized cells cannot be replaced 
if they are seriously dam- 
aged, which happens most 
commonly through disease. 
The process of replacing dis- 
eased cells with healthy 
cells is called cell therapy. 
This process is similar to 
transplanting organs. Only 
in this case the cells are 
being replaced. Stem cells 
can serve as an alternate 
and renewable source for 
specialized cells. 

In order to understand 
how stem cells work, it is 
important to know what 



stem cells are. Stem cells 
are the foundation cells for 
every organ, tissue and cell 
in the body. The characteris- 
tics of stem cells can treat 
diseases such as 

Alzheimer's, cancer and 
Parkinson's. 

Christine Venglass, a biol- 
ogy and pre-med student 
said, "I believe that stem 
cell transplants can help 
people who are in need due 
to a certain disease. I 
remember my mom had to 
receive cell therapy when 
she was diagnosed with 
breast cancer" 

Stem cells can come from 
the umbilical cord blood and 
the pulp under a baby's 
teeth. These cells are able to 
divide for longer times in 
cell cultures than those com- 
ing from adult stem cells. 
The cells in the umbilical 
cord blood are generally 
used in cell transplantation 
to reconstruct blood cell for- 
mation. 

Stem cells have the ability 
to be modified into different 
functional adult cell types. 



Hair stem cells have also 
been isolated and could help 
people with hair loss by 
allowing hair cell regenera- 
tion. In cases where bone 
marrow transplantation has 
occurred with a matched 
donor, adult stem cell 
replacement has become a 
treatment for people with 
blood cancer and other blood 
disorders. 

It is possible that one day 
people will be able to isolate 
their own bone marrow 
cells, treat them and then 
reintroduce them back into 
the body to repair cells in 
numerous different organs. 
Hematopoietic stem cells, 
which are found in bone 
marrow, are currently the 
only stem cells commonly 
used for therapy. The clini- 
cal potential of stem cells 
has also been used in the 
treatment of other human 
diseases, including diabetes 
and advanced kidney can- 
cer. However, these new 
therapies have only been 
offered to a few patients 
using adult stem cells. 



As reported from the 
International Society for 
Stem Cell Research, stem 
cell research has been con- 
fused with the idea of 
cloning. This could be 
caused by the fact that in 
both stem cell research and 
cloning, embryonic cells are 
used. The difference though, 
is that stem cell research 
does not always involve 
embryonic cells. Stem cell 
research involves the use of 
several different types of 
cells, such as adult stem 
cells from humans or ani- 
mals, stem cells from fetus- 
es, or from the umbilical 
cord. 

Another area that arises is 
the ethics behind stem cell 
research. The use of human 
embryos to isolate stem cells 
for research has caused 
many ethical and public 
debates about human 
embryos and their appropri- 
ate use. 

"I wouldn't say that I nec- 
essarily agree with using 
stem cells to recreate other 
cells that are messed up. On 



the other hand I am not 
ignorant to the fact that 
stem cell research is a 
means to fix problems," said 
Paul Skrgic, a former biolo- 
gy major at Clarion 
University. "Maybe if I 
found out that I had a prob- 
lem and it could be fixed 
with stem cell transplanta- 
tion, 1 would have a differ- 
ent view." 

A recent survey conducted 
at John Hopkins University 
showed that the majority of 
people surveyed about stem 
cell research were in favor of 
its use. Out of 2,212 people 
surveyed, 67 perecent were 
greatly in favor of stem cell 
research and its positive 
ramifications. 

A main issue that has 
some people in an uproar is 
that transplantation with 
the tissue in organs of 
unborn fetuses is occurring. 
The problems circulating 
around these areas of 
research are still being 
debated and as of now have 
been unresolved. 




franUstein Pr 



Mbook 

reserves the right to 

0eci1we what constitutes a costuml . 





Not good wrm any other 

OFFER OR DISCOUNT 



universitu Book Center 







PafleJ. 



THE CLARION CALL 



October 20. 2005 



iMtertiiimtt 



Students, performers band together for Katrina 




Jon Cofer 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Oct. 14 - 
Campus Crusade for Christ, 
Intervarsity Christian 

Fellowship and the sorority 
Theta Phi Alpha sponsored 
a Concert for Katrina in the 
Gemmell Student Center 
Multi-Purpose Room. 

Admission was $3, which 
benefited the American Red 
Cross. The event started 



around 7 p.m. and lasted 
until after 10 p.m. 

The event was put togeth- 
er by Jonathan Daniel, who 
said, "I thought of the idea 
the day after hurricane 
recovery began. I wanted to 
get involved somehow, but I 
was just a poor college kid." 
Daniel then contacted the 
two Christian groups that 
ended up helping to sponsor 
the show. 

Outside of the Multi- 
purpose Room a handful of 
girls from Theta Phi Alpha 
collected admission and 
stamped hands with a smi- 
ley face. Tiffany Bean, pres- 
ident of Theta Phi Alpha, 
said that they were "just 
helping JD [Jonathan 
Daniel] out." 

The first performer was 




Melissa Holller/r/ie Clarion Call 

THE POETIC DISCIPLES- These two christian rappers per- 
formed to support Hurricane Katrina. 



The Poetic Disciples, a 
Christian rap group, which 
consisted of two men. The 
lyrics of the first song they 
performed included a line 
saying, "Here we go 
Stealers, here we go!" which 
brought a good response 
from the crowd. Another 
song was about how kids 
who get physically and ver- 
bally bullied in schools turn 
to hate and violence, and 
the problem needs to be cut 
off at "the root." 

Up second was Russell 
Phillips, a special guest who 
just got back to Clarion after 
just being on active duty in 
Louisiana with the National 
Guard. "I was stationed 
down in Slidell and we set 
up a food distribution point 
where we handed out food, 
water and ice. When 
Hurricane Rita hit we 
moved over to Lake Charles 
and did the same thing 
there," Phillips later said. 
Phillips played a few 
acoustic songs and had a 
peaceful singing voice, a 
dramatic difference from the 
sound of the first perform- 
ance. 

The third act was the 
group The Silver Halos, an 
all-girl rock band from the 
lUP area (only one of the 
three, bassist/vocalist Tina 
Sykes, goes to lUP - the 
other two are in high 
school). The band played 
several original songs, 
including an instrumental 




THE SILVER HALOS - 

of Hurricane Katrina. 



Melissa Holller/fPie Clarion Call 

The all-female band plays original songs and covers to support the victims 



called "Apocalypse." The 
band also covered "Chick 
Magnet" by MXPX. 

"My sister and I have been 
in this band for about two 
years, but we've been 
through several drummers. 
This was our new drummer 
Alicia's first show - though 
she's been with us for a few 
weeks," Sykes said. 

About the show, her sister 
Sarah Sykes, 

guitarist/vocalist, said, "Not 
only is the money being 
raised for a good cause here 
great, but we get a chance to 
spread faith and hope 
through music." 

After an acoustic and 



piano performance by the 
next performer, including a 
duet with a member from 
The Poetic Disciples, 
Intervarsity Christian 

Fellowship member Jesse 
Roselius took the stage. 

Roselius gave a speech 
about how we care about the 
deaths of others in disasters 
because we realize the 
importance of every individ- 
ual given by God. He also 
said that natural disasters 
show us how we all have evil 
and sin in our hearts, point- 
ing out how the hurricane 
caused looting and police 
brutality. 

The last band, Shudder, 



was surrounded by smoke 
as the curtain opened. They 
are a four-piece heavy band 
with raspy vocals and occa- 
sional screaming. Shudder 
played a bunch of songs 
including one called "In The 
Mirror," which the lead 
singer said was "about 
knowing the right and 
wrong things... but finding 
it in your heart to do the 
wrong ones." 

According to Cody Ressel, 
student senate vice presi- 
dent, the concert raised 
$225 for the victims of 
Hurricane Katrina. 



CU theater presents Auburn's 'Proof/ math play 



Kevin Colonna 
and Jeannette Good 

CLARION, Oct. 13 - The 
Clarion University Theatre 
Department presented 

"Proof by David Auburn 
Oct. 11 through 15 at 8 p.m. 
in the Marwick-Boyd Little 
Theatre, directed by Robert 
Bullington. 

"Proof tells the story of a 
somewhat broken family. 
Catherine, 25, and her 
father Robert live in 
Chicago, 111. Catherine's 
older sister Claire moved to 
New York. Robert's death 
brings Claire to Chicago and 
Hal, a former student of 
Robert, to their home to leaf 
through Robert's old note- 
books. The play revolves 
around a wonderfully bril- 
liant and unimaginable 
mathematic proof and prov- 
ing the identity of its author. 
Zara Deardorrf, who 
played Catherine, stuttered 
a few times on her lines but 
gave a very strong, vocal 
performance. She also was 



very passionate about her 
role and able to stay in char- 
acter. Catherine's character 
was a very cynical, 
depressed, young girl who 
had somewhat of a pes- 
simistic view on life. She 
was a country girl who 
inherited her recently 
deceased father's brilliant 
mathematical skills, but she 
was worried that she may 
have inherited some of her 
father's insanity as well. 

Allison Wagner played 
Catherine's older sister 
Claire, who was more of a 
city girl and opposite of her 
sister in most ways. She 
spoke in a very high-class 
manner and had a lively, 
optimistic attitude, but, at 
the same time, came across 
as somewhat of a "ditzy" 
character. She was also self- 
conceited, and, while she 
was there for her family 
financially, she was never 
there for them physically, 
whereas Catherine was 
there for her father. As a 
performer, Wagner gave an 
overall good performance, 



she was very lively and into 
character but somewhat of 
an overactor at times. Her 
facial expressions needed to 
be toned down a bit as well 
as her high-class speaking. 

Jesse Mcllvaine played 
Hal, a young mathematician 
following in Catherine's 
father's shoes. However, he 
didn't seem to be as lively in 
his acting as the other char- 
acters, his pronunciation 
was to some extent drab, at 
certain times throughout 
the play. Otherwise, he gave 
a good performance and 
really knew what he was 
doing. The character Hal 
was not your stereotypical 
mathematician; he was 
young, good-looking, a parti- 
er and a drummer in a rock 
band, which gave this math- 
ematician somewhat of a 
"bad-boy" image. He had a 
fling with Catherine, telling 
her that he'd noticed her 
long ago and always had 
feelings for her. 

Robert, Catherine's father, 
was played by Brad 
Harrington, who gave a very 



strong, believable perform- 
ance. Robert was a crazy, 
eccentric mathematician 
who at the same time was 
brilliant. He had reached 
several mathematical mile- 
stones by the age of 22. 
Harrington really connected 
with the character of 
Catherine; he did an excel- 
lent job of portraying 
Catherine's father. 

The hghting during the 
show was somewhat over- 
bearing at certain times. 
However, the lighting was 
good in portraying what 
time of the day it was, night, 
morning, etc. 

As for the sound, the the- 
ater was small, so no micro- 
phones were necessary in 
order to deliver the amount 
of vocalization that was 
needed. The only music that 
was played throughout the 
show was during scene tran- 
sitions and was primarily 
country. There was also 
some soft rock music that 
was coming out of the house 
during the party. 

The costumes were 



mediocre and not very elab- 
orate, but suited the charac- 
ters. Claire wore mostly 
purple and other bold colors 
to show of her "city- girl" 
look, while her sister 
Catherine wore very drab, 
faded clothing that was pri- 
marily neutral in color, pre- 
dominantly bringing out the 
depression of her character. 
Hal wore clothing that 
matched the stereotypical 
mathematician, very plain 
and simple yet clean cut, 
consisting of mostly black 
and white. 

The set for the play was 
elaborate. The house was 
purple, and the whole play 
took place on the porch. An 
old bicycle rested on the side 
of the worn down railing. 
The furniture was inten- 
tionally mismatched, show- 
ing the family's status, and 
a tree and leaves on the roof 
depicted autumn. 

"Proof was directed 
toward adult audiences, and 
the language showed this. 
The "queen mother of dirty 
words," as it is called in "A 



Christmas Story," was used 
as nouns, adjectives, verbs 
and everything in between 
in "Proof" 

Another running joke was 
that of mathematicians 
being the hardest partiers. 
Even Claire, the city girl, 
couldn't out-drink mathe- 
maticians. There were math 
jokes throughout which 
sometimes needed at least a 
general understanding of 
math. For example, Hal's 
band played a song called i, 
as in imaginary number. 

"Proof started with a pow- 
erful opening, but the end- 
ing left the audience hang- 
ing but not in a good way. 
We never found out what 
happened with the proof 
Was it published? We never 
found out what the story 
was with Catherine. Did she 
stay in Chicago? Did Hal 
really have feelings for her? 
Did Hal mean everything he 
said to Catherine? 

"Proof was free to stu- 
dents. It cost $9 for adults 
and $6 for children. It was 
sold out on Oct. 13. 



CU reads for breast cancer cure, raffles quilt 



Steve Trichtinger 
Clarior) Call Staff Writer 

CLARION, Oct. 14 - The 
Reading for the Cure took 
place on Oct. 14 at 6 p.m. in 
Moore Hall. The English 
Club and Sigma Tau Delta 
sponsored the eighth year of 
the reading. The money 
raised by the event was 
donated to the Susan G. 
Komen Pittsburgh Race for 
the Cure. The Race for the 
Cure benefits the education 
and research of breast can- 
cer. 

When you walked through 
the doors at Moore Hall, 
Zeta Tau Alpha, who also 



works with the Susan G. 
Komen Breast Cancer 
Foundation, was helping out 
by distributing information 
about the disease. 

Lisa Wilkes, program 
director for the Race for the 
Cure, said, "It is really 
important to raise aware- 
ness in college campuses, 
it's the age where you really 
need to become aware." 
Breast cancer really 
becomes a risk starting at 
age 20. Breast cancer causes 
about 40,000 deaths a year. 
"The one thing we know is 
that early detection saves 
lives, and an event like this 
is a great way to spread that 
message," Wilkes said. 



The event would not have 
been possible without 
English professor. Dr. Kevin 
Stemmler. Dr. Stemmler has 
been involved with 
this program 
since its 

start. The 
disease hits 
home with 
him, as it 
does with 
many people 
who have had 
family or friends 
fighting this dis- 
ease. 

The event had over 
20 readers present 
ing passages from 
poems and/or 




short stories. Besides 
Clarion students and com- 
munity members, also in 
attendance were alumnae 
and students from universi- 
ties such as lUP 
and Slippery 
Rock. Many 
people in the 
community 
also helped 
out by donat- 
ing little 
gifts to raffle 
after each 
reading. 
"It is a wonder- 
ful opportunity for 
the university to 
work together with 
the community 



and come together for a 
common cause," said 
Stemmler. 

A big part of this commu- 
nity help was from Sally 
Byers of Countryside Crafts 
and Quilts in Knox, Pa. who, 
for all eight years, hand 
made and donated the quilts 
that were also raffled off "If 
not for Sally none of this 
would have been possible," 
said Stemmler 

Heather Lewis, president 
of Sigma Tau Delta, and 
Jess Bayer, president of the 
English Club, had goals for 
the night. "Our main goal is 
to raise awareness. October 
is breast cancer awareness 
month, so it is good to try to 



do our part to raise money 
for the Susan G. Koman 
Foundation" said Bayer. 

"Because we raise enough 
money each year, we get our 
university's name on the 
back of the Race for the 
Cure T-shirts as official 
sponsors, and that is a real- 
ly big accomplishment," said 
Lewis. 

At the end of the night, the 
event raised $1150. 
Stemmler summed up the 
power of the night and all 
those involved, "The efforts 
of a few people make a huge 
difference and that's the 
most important part of all of 
it. A few people can really 
make a change." 



October 20. 2005 



TH£ CLARION CALL 






Page 9 



The Aquabats take 'Charge!!' 




Elisa Borger 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

"Charge!!" 

Artist: The Aquabats 



rating:5/5 



#r#»#r» 



The Aquabats started back 
in the mid 90s, and eventu- 
ally, turned into "the ska 
band who wore costumes, 
dressed up as superheroes 
with identical masks, with 
MC Bat Commander lead- 
ing the way." Albums like 
"The Fury of The Aquabats," 



"The Aquabats vs. The 
Floating Eye of Death" and 
"Myths. Legends and Other 
Amazing Adventures" were 
some of their earlier 
albums. 

The Aquabats are very 
reminiscent of the band 
Devo, mixed with some 80s 
new wave band, and a httle 
punk as well. Their new 
album. "Charge!!" is their 
first full length album in six 
years, and it is clearly an 
example of how The 
Aquabats can't be confined 
into one genre for their 
whole musical existence. 

"Charge!!" is simply a fun 
album, jam packed with 13 
songs, ranging from new 
wave synth sounds to ridicu- 
lously funny lyrics such as 
in "Hot Summer Nights 
(Won't Last Forever!)," one 
of my favorites by far on the 
album. 



The crazy lyrics include, "I 
saw you there with your 
pretty blondeish hair, eating 
a breakfast burrito, you 
seemed so neato." 

The lyrics to this album 
are the best part, being very 
witty, with a sarcastic edge. 
Like I mentioned before, 
"Hot Summer Nights (Won't 
Last Forever!)" probably 
stands out as the best song, 
lyrically. 

The album flows together 
very well, as if it were 
telling a story, and you were 
anxious to hear what the 
next track has in store. 
From "Fashion Zombies!" to 
"Mechanical Ape!" (yes, 
every title has an exclama- 
tion mark at the end!), you'll 
find yourself having a good 
time just listening to the 
album. 

Songs like, "Stuck in a 
Movie!" have great bass 



lines and awesome drum 
work, while songs like 'Look 
at Mo!" feature radical gui- 
tar riffs. 

Vocally, MC Bat 
Commander's voice ranges 
song to song from a reggae- 
like sound in "Waterslides!" 
to Misfit-inspired punk in 
"Fashion Zombies!" 

"Awesome Forces!" basical- 
ly offers perfect insight on 
the album, and The 
Aquabats themselves, with 
the lyrics. For example, one 
line says, "We cannot die, no 
way." These lyrics basically 
show how this album is in 
no way the end of their 
musical adventure, and if 
you don't like them, well, 
they are ready for a fight! 

"Charge!!" is a highly 
enjoyable nerd-rock experi- 
ence, which shows The 
Aquabats are pretty much 
capable of anything. 



Sins of father visted upon kids 



{ 


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1 




I 


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^t// 



Nathan Stahlman 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

"The Fog- 
Director: Rupert Wainwright 
Sony Pictures 
rating: 3/5 



#n$r#F 



"The Fog" is a remake of 
the 1980 John Carpenter 
film of the same name. In 
this movie a supernatural, 
ghost-carrying fog attacks 
the citizens of a small town 
on the coast of Oregon. 

Why are these ghosts 
killing the pleasant people 
of this town? Well, 100 years 
earlier, the founders of this 
town screwed over a ship 
full of people with leprosy 
and the passengers all died. 
These clever ghosts waited 
in their watery graves for 
100 years to pass and every- 
one to forget about what 
really happened, then decid- 



ed to exact their revenge by 
hunting down the descen- 
dents of the town's four 
founding fathers. This 
makes it very difficult to live 
if your last name is Castle, 
Williams, Wayne or Malone. 
Three of these names, along 
with an outsider named 
Spooner (DeRay Davis), 
develop into our main char- 
acters. 

Nick Castle, the lead, is 
played by Smallville's Tom 
Welling (too bad he doesn't 
have those super powers to 
save everyone from the 
ghosts). His girlfriend 
Elizabeth Williams (Maggie 
Grace), and the DJ from a 
lighthouse-top independent 
radio station, Stevie Wayne 
(Selma Blair), round off the 
main three. In all the acting 
was pretty decent, especial- 
ly for a horror/thriller 
movie. 

Now, I don't usually 
approve of remaking old 
movies. I generally approve 
even less of remaking 1980s 
"B" horror flicks with bigger 
budgets and better effects. 
Not only is "remaking" uno- 
riginal but it also ruins the 
joy of watching a truly bad 
horror movie. Some of the 



most fun times I've had 
watching movies with my 
friends was laughing 



(1 



Now, I don't usually 
approve of remaking 
old movies. 



)> 



through terribly made '80s 
horror movies. 

Back to "The Fog," John 
Carpenter is still credited as 
a writer and as producer so 
he apparently approves of 
this movie. If Carpenter can 
approve of the remaking of 
"The Fog," I guess I can 
semi-approve of it. 

From what I can remem- 
ber, the remake follows the 
original plot quite closely. 
The story is also very inter- 
esting and, back in 1980, 
was very original, so the 
question is, can better 
effects and better acting 
really make a better movie? 
I don't think that's necessar- 
ily the case. The acting and 
effects just make it a differ- 



ent kind of movie than the 
original. The original is the 
type of movie you'd watch 
with all your friends and 
love it because the effects 
are so cheesy. The remake is 
more of a date movie, not too 
scary but just enough that 
she'll want someone to hold 
on to. 

In all, this movie was pret- 
ty good. It kept me ade- 
quately entertained for the 
hour and 40-minute run- 
time. 

Since I'm apparently sup- 
posed to point out every dis- 
crepancy, this movie has 
plenty. Only one, however, 
actually bothered me. The 
town was founded in 1871 
and this movie supposedly 
took place 100 years after it 
was founded, which would 
make it 1971. However, 
there were laptop complit- 
ers, DVD video cameras and 
new cars, setting the film a 
lot closer to the present. 
This wasn't really enough to 
make me dislike the movie, 
so I'm still giving it a 3. 

Some other new releases 
you can check out are 
Elizabethtown and Domino. 
Until next week, happy 
viewing. 



The Warriors' released as DVD 




Steve Trichtinger 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

"The Warriors" 
Director: Walter Hill 
Paramount Pictures 
rating:4/5 !|r!$n$r!$r 

On Oct. 4 the "Ultimate 
Directors Cut" of the cult 
classic film "The Warriors" 
was released on DVD. The 
movie, originally released in 
1979, is one of the most 
quoted movies. With classic 
lines like, "Can you dig it?" 
and "Warriors, come out to 
plaaaay!" there is nothing 
not to like about the classic 



film's new DVD release. On 
second thought, maybe 
there is. 

I am usually on the fence 
about director's cuts. They 
can alter the whole movie in 
positive or negative ways. In 
the "Donnie Darko" direc- 
tor's cut DVD, things are 
explained a lot better then 
the original movie and it 
works for the movie. 
"Mallrats," which had a 
tenth anniversary director's 
cut released last month, is 
on the other side of the ball. 
"Mallrats" is one of my 
favorite movies, but the new 
cut stinks something awful. 
The new cut of "The 
Warriors" is like neither of 
the two. Some things 
worked, while some fell 
short of my expectations. 
The major complaint I have 
about the DVD is that the 
original version of the film 
is not on the disc. Movies 
like "Stripes" and "Mallrats" 



both contain the original 
version of the film on the 
director's cut DVDs. The 
original DVD release was 
grainy and sound quality 
was bad. This version is 
excellent in sound and pic- 
ture. It would have been 
nice to see that original ver- 
sion in the same high quali- 
ty as the director's cut. 

Without giving too much 
away, the major differences 
are in the cuts between 
scenes. When some scenes 
end, a still frame comic book 
drawing appears and then it 
cuts to a new scene. This is 
neat and all but some of the 
classic moments in the film 
are somewhat ruined. A 
comic book still frame alters 
the original high tension 
first meeting between The 
Warriors and The Baseball 
Furies into a comic book 
joke. The still frames also 
change the ending, in my 
opinion, for the worse. In 



some cases though it works, 
and the cuts transition very 
well. 

Personally, I think that the 
new take on the film is well 
done. If you have not seen 
the film, watch the original 
first. If you are a fan of the 
original, buy the director's 
cut, it's worth it. If you are 
one of the "hardcore" fans of 
the original film, you will 
feel betrayed by the changes 
and may want to watch it 
just so you can call it a "hor- 
rible adaptation" and how 
you would like to "burn it 
and drop one on the ashes." 
The truth is, despite the 
changes, the director's cut of 
"The Warriors" is still good 
and the special features are 
decent. The DVD is worth at 
least renting for any movie 
fan, and "The Warriors" will 
still hold up against any 
film released in 2005. 



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CU hosts choral festival 

Clarion University hosted a High School Choral 
Festival on Oct. 19 at 9 a.m. in Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium. Eight high schools performed: A-C Valley 
Senior High School Chorus, Brookville High School 
Concert Choir, Clarion Singers, Clarion-Limestone 
Concert Choir, Keystone High School Concert Choir, 
North Clarion Senior High School Chorus, Redbank 
Valley High School Chorus, Rocky Grove Senior High 
Chorus. Each group performed for approximately 15 
minutes, singing about three songs. After the perform- 
ances, Dr. Henry Alviani projected the music to "Irish 
Blessing" and had all of the groups and attendees sing 
it together. The event ended before noon. 

JEANNETTE GOOD 

'Bad News Bears' 

The University Activities Board (UAB) presented the 
film "Bad News Bears" Oct. 13 to 16. The movie is a 
remake of the 1976 version starring Walter Matthau, 
who plays the coach of a foul-mouthed little league 
baseball team. Like the original, this "Bad News 
Bears" centers on Morris Buttermaker (Billy Bob 
Thornton), the team's hot-tempered, hard-drinking 
coach. In this new version, Buttermaker (Thornton) is 
hired by an enthusiastic team mother and attorney Liz 
Whitewood (Marcia Gay Harden). 

Buttermaker, who spends his days as a careless exter- 
minator, and spends many nights hitting the bars, is 
soon charged with firing up the Bears, a team so terri- 
ble that the league is considering withdrawing their 
permission to even play baseball. While one bear is 
playing in a wheelchair, the rest of his teammates can 
hardly play at all because they have no coordination 
skills. Although this is the case, most of the players 
think they have good baseball skills. To make things 
even worse, they also have very dirty mouths. 

Throughout the tilm, the Bears suffer through some 
pretty harsh losses and humiliation. They realize that 
it's time to get serious, so the team develops a brand 
new attitude and two new recruits. Soon, the Bears are 
tearing up the league, building their way to the cham- 
pionship battle with the Yankees. 

KIMBERLY CAMMUSO 

Nebel performs recital 

Amanda Nebel, music education major, performed her 
senior piano recital on Oct. 16 at 3:15 p.m. in Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium. She played "Praeludium and Fuga 
17 in A-flat Major" by Johann Sebastian Bach, 
"Fantasy in D Minor, K. 397" by Wolfgang Amadeus 
Mozart, "Rhapsodie in G Minor, Op. 79, No. 2" by 
•'Johannes Brahms, "Waltz in A-flat Major, Op. 69, No. 
1" by Fryderyk Chopin and 'The Cat and the Mouse" by 
Aaron Copland. jeanNETTE GOOD 

New Bond soon in action 

After an 18-month search, the producers of the James 
Bond film franchise have chosen British actor Daniel 
Craig ('"Ibmb Raider," "Road to Perdition") to take over 
the role of the debonair superspy James Bond. Craig 
will be the sixth actor in the franchise to play Bond, fol- 
lowing Sean Connery, George Lazenby, Roger Moore, 
Timothy Dalton and most recently Pierce Brosnan. 
Since the last Bond film "Die Another Day," a string of 
possible replacements for Brosnan have been consid- 
ered, including other British actors such as Jude Law 
and Ewan McGregor, and Australian actors Hugh 
Jackman and Erie Bana. As of this point, there is no 
word as to when the next Bond film will be released, 
but surely everyone will be excited to see the new 

"blond" 007 in action. 

KEVIN COLONNA 

iTunes offers episodes 

Apples iTunes began offering downloads of every 
episode of "Lost," "Desperate Housewives" and "Night 
Stalker"— along with music videos and a small catalog 
of other Disney/ABC shows. This endeavor seems 
promising, but it ends up slightly short of the mark. 
The long download time and low video quality, com- 
pared to DVD, will need to be remedied before the inno- 
vation will be recognized. The pricing structure is also 
uneven; iTunes is charging the same price ($1.99) for a 
music video as the hour-length shows. 
The only use for the service, for now, will be to those 
who miss an episode of their favorite show and need to 
catch up quickly. 

TOM MCMEEKIN 



Family Health 
Council, Inc. 



1064A. East Main Street 

814-226-7500 
WHiv.flicinc.org 



Providing birth control, cmcrgcncv 

contraception and gync services. 

Free STD testin" & treatment. 



Most insurance plans accepted. 

Sliding scale fees tor those without insurance. 

All ser\ ices are confidential. 



Page 10 



THE CLARION CALL 



October 20, 2005 



Clissilieis 



lim'k \k Travel. Emplipicnl. For Itcnl, hmmk and liciiHiil \t 



W 



GREEKS 



at the house 
KAP 



(^ongrnts Sister of the Week, 
Karen Nicodemus! 
•Love, Your AZ Sisters 

Congrats Chair of the Week. 
Sara Heiman! 
Love. Your AZ Sisters 

Keep up all the great work 

Fall 2005!! 

-Love. Your AZ Sisters 

Keep up the good academic 
work! I'm so proud of you! 
LITP ■ Jewelez your scholar- 
ship chair. 
■Oil 

<J)II sends much thanks to 
III for a great float part- 
nership. Congrats on 2nd 
place! 
-<MI 

Congratulations to the 
Shlubby of the Week. Ryan 
Licht! 
■KAP 

Congratulations to the KAP 
Brother of the Week, Mike 
PouUiot! 
-KAP 

R.I.P. Lucifer, you will be 

missed. 

-KAP 

Eric "Shlubby" Hand, good 
luck in your quest to be the 
next Zeta "cuddle bunny." 
•Love. Your KAP Brothers 

Paul Fitzgerald, 

Happy 42nd birthday! We'll 

get you out of the slammer 

someday! 

-KAP 

Job Opportunity, 
We are looking for maids for 
the KAP house. The only 
qualifications are that you 
are good looking and should 
expect little to no pay. Apply 



MjiflHHMHNHNHNHNHHHHMNHHMHMHHHHMMHHBMM* 

DO YOU THINK YOU 
MIGHT BE PREGNANT? 
CALL AAA LIFE SER- 
VICES AT 226-7007. FREE 
& (X)NFIDENTIAL. 

Want to win a Harley or 
$500 cash? Oil is selling 
raffle tickets for $5/ticket 
downstairs Gemmell 11-5 



Tues-Wed 

proceeds 

SAGES. 



10/25-10/26. All 
benefit PAS 



Money for College. 

The Army is currently offer- 
ing sizable bonuses of up to 
$20,000. In addition to the 
cash bonuses, you may qual- 
ify' for up to $70,000 for col- 
lege through the 
Montgomery GI Bill and 
Army College Fund. Or you 
could pay back up to 
$65,000 of qualifying stu- 
dent loans through the 
Army's Loan Repayment 
Program. To find out more, 
call 814-227-2313. 

Student senate will be host- 
ing its annual Campus 
Safety Walk on Oct. 25 at 6 
p.m. in front of Public 
Safety. All are welcome! 



■MM 



FOR SENT 



EAGLE PARK APART 

MENTS: Fully furnished, 
includes utilities. 3 blocks 
from campus. Leasing for 
spring, summer and fall. 
Safe, clean, beautiful. 814- 
226-4300 - www.eagle- 
park.net. 

APARTMENTS accommo- 
dating 14 people and 
Houses for 4-8 people 
AVAILABLE FOR the 
FALL 2006/ SPRING 2007 



semesters. Exceptionally 
nice and well-maintained 
Off Campus Housing!!! 
Come and check us out and 
see for yourself! Call Patty 
or Andrea at 814 226 4430 
(Office) 8142295190 or 
814-7453121. 

APARTMENTS for 3 4 peo- 
ple and HOUSES for 4 7 
people available for the FaU 
2006/Spring 2007 semes- 
ters. Get a great place for 
next vear! Call Barb at 814- 
226-0757 or 814379-9721 
for more info. 

ROLL OUT OF BED AND 
GO TO CLASS! Houses and 
apartments next to campus. 
See them at www.grayand- 
company.net or call FREE 
Gray and Co. 877-562- 1020. 

Houses for rent 200506. 

Close to campus. For 2 and 4 
females. Call 814-226-6867. 

Next to campus, a wide 
selection of houses and 
apartments for Fall 
2006/Spring 2007 and 
Summer 2006. Various 
accommodation for groups 
of 2 to 8 students. View 
them on-line at 

www.aceyrental.com or call 
814-227-1238. 

Two person, 2 bedroom 
apartment for Spring 2006. 

Includes utilities. Call 
Ferguson Rental at 814-379- 
3385 or 814-764-5506 ext. 
125. 

Two, 3 and 4 person apart- 
ments for Fall 2006/Spring 
2007. Includes utilities. Call 
Ferguson Rental at 814-379- 
3385 or 814764-5506 ext. 
125. 



Includes Meals, MTV 
Celebrity Parties! Cancun, 
Acapulco, Jamaica From 
$499! Campus Reps Needed! 
PromoCode- 31 www.spring- 
breaktravelcom 1 800 678 
6386 

Spring Break 2006. Travel 
with STS, America's #1 
Student Tour Operator to 
Jamaica, Cancun. Acapulco, 
Bahamas and Florida. Now 
hiring on-campus reps. Call 
for group discounts. 
Information/Reservations 
1800 648-4849 or 

www.ststravel.com. 

PERSONALS^ 

Congrats to Sarah Beck for 
the St. Louis Senator of the 
Week! 
-Student Senate 

Congrats to Trevor 
McGaughey for this week's 
Senator of the Week! 
-Student Senate 

Cheese Ball, 

Thank you for always mak- 



ing me smile and brighten- 
ing each and every one of 
my days. I can't wait to see 
you again. 
-Little Pancake 

BUPS. 

Happy birthday! Love you. 

"1^ Ashley and Lucy 

Ibddy. 

ILY, sir. Hows the wife and 

kids? Haha. 

-YMETM. ir Ashley 

XOXO 

Hi Dave Dang, 
My Clarion bestest bar 
buddy! I've been so busy, 
we'll hang out soon • look, 
you have it in writing! 
- ^ Boynes 

R.I.P Tommy Maddox's 
career, its been real. 
-A bitter Steeler fan 

Chelsey, 

You're winning my game. I'll 

bite you again. 

■Dusty 

Meghan, 

Your tinsel tastes better 



than those treats you make 

me cry for. 

-Dusty 

Paul, 

I miss those days when you 
would shove me under your 
shirt and call me your baby. 
-Ijove, Dusty 

Em, 

Its been a long night. I'm 

really looking forward to 

seeing you! Thank you for 

all your help! I really do 

appreciate your assistance. 

■Me 

Sarah Elizabeth Dent, 
Hope you feel better soon. 
Much love from your one 
and only, favorite bff for life. 
■IT 'lilMe 

Dear Corndaddy, 

Myrna loves you more then 

a flying burrito. 

■JDawg 

Happy 21st Birthday 
Audrey! Congrats on never 
getting an underage. 
■Love, Your Rommates 



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October 20. 2005 



Tm CLARION CALL 



Page 11 




Golf team named 2005 Champs 



larion 
corcboard 



Cross Country 


Golf 


Tennis 


Oct. 8 


Oct. 2-3 


Oct. 1 


@ Carnegie Mellon 


Wheeling Jesuit Invite 


@ Niagara 


W- 1 of 9; M- 2 of 12 


4 of 12 


1-7, L 


Oct. 15 


Oct. 15-16 


VoUeybaU 


@ Waynesburg 


PSAC Championships 


Oct. 8 


W- 1 of 13; M 1 of 11 


lofS 


Cheney 
3-0, W 


FootbaU 


Soccer 




Oct. 8 


Oct. 17 


Oct. 11 


East Stroudsburg 


Lock Haven 


@ SUppery Rock 


0-56, L 


0-6, L 


0-3, L 


Oct. 15 


Oct. 19 


Oct. 18 


Lock Haven 


@ California 


California 


16-0, W 


0-2, L 


1-3, L 



'GOLF* continued from 
page 12 

"We felt that we had a 
very strong team this year 
and really felt that it was 
our tournament to go out 
and win." 

Coach Lefevre was very 
pleased with the results and 
everyone's play in the event 
"everyone played a great 
two days of golf and it was 
just a good team effort." 

The Golden Eagles golf 
team won only their third 
conference championship in 



25 years, but it was their 
second championship in the 
last four years. 

Coach Lefevre said, "It 
was a really nice accom- 
plishment for the program 
and for the players." 

Even though the fall golf 
season just ended on 
Sunday, Coach Lefevre and 
the rest of the team have 
goals set for the spring sea- 
son. 

"We have not been able to 
make it to the National 
Tournament, and that's our 
focus for the spring is to 
make it there." 



By winning the conference 
championship this past 
weekend the Eagles took 
their first step towards 
accomplishing that feat. 

With the win, the Eagles 
clinched an automatic berth 
to the NCAA Division II 
Regional Championship in 
May. 

If the Eagles can earn a 
win in the Regional 
Championship in May then 
they will make it to the 
National Tournament. 



CU at Athletic Events 



Cross Country 


Swiming and Diving 


Nov. 1 


Oct. 29 


Oct. 22 


@ Edinboro 


@ PSAC Championships 


Clarion Fall Classic 


Nov. 5 


(Slippery Rock) 




Lock Haven 




Oct. 26 


Nov. 11-12 


Nov. 5 


Allegheny 


@ PSAC Championships 


@NCAA Regionals 






(Lock Haven) 


Oct. 29 






@ Carnegie Mellon 


Women's BasketbaU 

Nov. 15 


FootbaU 


Oct. 30 


Charleston 


Oct. 22 


Clarion Diving Invitational 




@ Shippensburg 




Nov. 19 




Nov. 4 


Point Park 


Oct. 29 


@ Shippensburg 




Indiana 




Nov. 23 




Nov. 12 


Ashland 


Nov. 5 


@ Akron 




Slippery Rock 


Nov 19 


Nov. 25-27 




Grand Valley State 


@ lUP Tournament 


Men's BasketbaU 


(swimming) 




Nov. 18-19 






@ Geneva Tournament 


Nov. 20 


Wrestling 




Grand Valley State 


'Novri3 ^^-^ 




(diving) 


@ Penn State Duals 


Soccer 






Oct. 21 
@ Salem 


VoUeybaU 

Oct. 21-22 


Nov. 19 

@ Ashland Duals 




@ Shippensburg (Regional) 


Nov. 26 


Oct. 23 




@ Mat Town Invitational 


St. Vincent 


Oct. 25 
Indiana 


(Lock Haven) 




Photo courtesy of John Thompson 

SCRATCH AND CLAW- Eagles push the pile during Clarion's 16-0 win Saturday over LHU. 




l[j)lf nii If Fal 1(1 id Fleiil lip «l h'p to P mi Ik 
[iiii)et(ilwasplteiitoli)igi|0iiiisJanii!])1l,ll 



Want to write for r/>e Clarion Caltf 

Contact: Josh Woods, Sports Editor 
393-2830 








r^hbH VIUAGHS 



^i^ 



Douf Kntf^ -NmmuMl. Rfcwatioiv &Club Spoil D»f<lQr 3931 667 




jmm. 



Ultimate Frisbee Tourn. Results 

10/18/05 Semi-Final Games 

G. Box of Emotion ROC 9- 1 

TheGuacs Americans 10-5 

Championship game is slated for 

Wednesday, October 1 9 at 6pm 

Glass Box of Emotion vs. The Gmm 

Indoor wSoccer Results 

10/1 7/05 Men 
Bust-a-move Elk Cly Boys F 

10/17./05Co-Rec 
Rookies 6Guys, 2Girl8 4-1 

10/18/05 Co-Kec 
6 Guys 2 Girls Elk Cly Crew F 

Hockey Results 

10/17/05 



qio^^st fQ ^1^^ Pin Result^ 

Champ Mike Richards 2V(r lo the pin! 
Shane Darcaiigelo 23' 
Ryan Quail 29' 

Chris Cole 35' 

Jason Kooser n/a! 

FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE 

WWW.ACIS>SPORTS.COM 



Slow Learners 
Icelandic Kittens 
Terminators 

10/13/05 
Slow Ivearners 
Drunk Bandits 
The Wannabees 



Wannabees ^ 7-3 
Drunk Bandits 1-0 
Puck U F 

Puck U F 

Terminators 9-0 
Icelandic Kit. F 




Still time to register for. . . 
3 on 3 Basketball 
Table Tennis 

Indoor Soccer 

Register on-line or at the Rec Center!!! 



Pick the correct winners of the 3 college 
football Qamas each week and you could win 
anything form a T-ihirt lo an X_Box Game 
System or an I-pod Bo/e Sound Dock!! 

WWW.ACIS-SP0RTS.COM 

Pliylnd it FREE 

Intramurars on the Web 
clarion.edu/intramurals 

or from the CUP home page click 
on Athletics then Intramurals 



Flag Football Results 

10/18/05 
Free Bailers The Meat 
Prime Time DaHuslla/ 
Niiphies St MIJ 
The Beers Lady Canes 
Quick 6 Bench Press This 
Schlit/ Boondock Saints 

Annex P R. Ball/ Deep 
Hard Muffins Steelers 
No Ma'am KDR 

10/12/05 
Annex of PR lunatics 
Quick 6 Just Ball 
D wet Stop Schlitz's 
Boondock Sts KDR 
Prime Time Nuphies 
Balls Deep lady Canes 

Flag Football Standings 

Top 12 as of 10/18,05 (W-J.-F) 

I Prime Time (9-0) 

2. Free Ballei-s (9-0-1) 

3. Hard Muffins 5 (6-0-1) 
4.DaHu$tla? (M) 
SJuslBall (6-1) 

6. The Beers (6-1) 

7. Dudes We Can't Slop (5-1) 

8. Annex of PR (4-1) 

9. Schlitz's (4-4) 

10. Ball/ Deep (3-3) 

11. Bench Press This (4-5) 

12. lady Canes (4-7) 



F 

42-28 

m 

48-21 

44-6 

38-22 

3845 

39-28 

38-14 

40-15 

47-30 

35-6 

39-38 

37-6 

33-17 



riiitdoor Soccer Champs 

Chun^pionship game 10 1.>'05 
ream h 1 Iniernutiontds 5-2 

The Team #1 upset <he top seeded 
Inlernaiional feam in a tied score hhoot-aut! 
Con^iraliiliitions to; Adam Shockink, Michael 
Miirttn, Brian Mauser. Sel Monteteone, 
Shannon Kerr, Michallc Sherman, .lacob 
Porter. Bri;m Swa/ic, Stefan Marcella, Wmd 
Weaven Zaeh Vueic, and Mekensic, 

Volleyball Results 

W«mpn%'l 0/1 8/05 

BcthMudrey Don't Cha's F 

Girls learn RT 21-10,22-20 

10/17/05 

BethMudrcv Team RT 2 M 4, n/a 

TBA Sexy Women 21-6. 21-15 

!0/11'05 

(iirls Don't Cha\^ I' 

Co-Reel o/lK/05 

The tigers Cheer CI' 22-20,21-10 

Alh. ciial Mil^e Coyne V 

1 .ad Y Canes t wk\ \ 'sv \m\\ n/a 

NiltvNciters TunaTacos n/a 

10/ 17/05 

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THE CLAMON CALL 



October 20. 2005 



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Blue and Gold Game kicks off 2005-06 
season for Golden Eagle basketball 



Zachary Ramsey 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_zaramsey@clarion.edu 

CLARION. Oct. 15 - The 
men's and women's basket- 
ball teams each tipped off 
their respective seasons in a 
Tippin Gymnasium filled 
with the Clarion faithful as 
the annual Blue and Gold 
game was held last 
Saturday. 

The women began the 
event at 10 p.m. as students 
helped themselves to the 
free Domino's pizza. 
Sophomore Jessica 

Albanese, who is expected to 
contribute heavily this sea- 
son at the forward position, 
expressed that the event 
was "very exciting. Not just 
the game, but the whole 
start of the season." 

The night featured excit- 
ing play from both the blue 
and gold sides, especially as 
probable starters, sopho- 
more Ashley Grimm and 
senior Melba Melton faced 
off at the top of the key. 

Grimm, who logged more 
than 1000 minutes last year 
as a freshman point guard 
when the team went 23-7 
(first in the Pennsylvania 




Photo courtesy of John Thompson 

BASKETBALL HAS RETURNED- The Golden Eagles men's and women's basketball teams will look 
to build on last year's postseason performances in 2006. 



State Athetic Conference), 
was excited about the match 
up. 

"It's an amazing experi- 
ence," said Grimm of play- 
ing against Melton, 
"because she is constantly 
making me better. She is so 



quick." 

That speed is something 
Coach Gie Parsons will look 
to take advantage of this 
season as the team switches 
to a more guard-based 
offense to accommodate for 
the loss of Heather Cigich 



and Shay Godwin the pair 
that lead them to into the 
NCAA D-II tournament. 

"We're very quick, lots of 
speed," said Parsons about 
the feel of this year's squad. 
"And we've shown such good 
defense - tenacious defense." 



After the exhibition and a 
round of two ball that fea- 
tured members from the 
crowd, it was the men's 
turn. "It's always special to 
get out here and get in front 
of the home fans early," said 
Coach Ron Righter. "They 
get an early look at the team 
... and it's really nice to get 
the support." 

When asked what types of 
things he looks for in his 
players during this exhibi- 
tion, Righter commented 
that he just wanted to "relax 
and have fun... coming up 
over the next few months 
there are going to be times 
that it's not so fun, so just 
enjoy playing tonight." 

The entire team was excit- 
ed about the game. "It's the 
first step on the road to suc- 
cess," said forward Brent 
Nelson, who is expected to 
miss most of the year with 
an injury, but is still adding 
comments of encouragement 
about his team. 

Along with the already 
injured Nelson, guard 
Frank Torbert, who connect- 
ed on 26 of 65 (.400) of his 3- 
pointers last year to com- 
pensate for the loss of Justin 
Collins, sustained an non- 
contact injury to his knee. It 



is suspected that this 
mishap will keep Torbert 
out of the line-up for most if 
not all of the season. 

If any coach knows how to 
work a team with injuries, 
though, it's coach Righter. 
Despite major injuries to 
several key players, Righter 
coached the team to a 19-9 
record (first in the PSAC) 
and a home playoff game 
last season. 

This is the last Clarion 
basketball game fans will be 
seeing for a month. The 
women will begin their sea- 
son at home against 
Charleston on Nov. 15, 
while the men will not begin 
action until the Geneva 
Tournament on Nov. 18-19. 



Clarion Basketball 

Women's Basketball 
vs. Charleston 
Nov. 15, 6 p.m. 



Men's Basketball vs. 

District of Columbia 

Nov. 30, 7:30 p.m. 



Sports feature: 

Cooper follows in sister's dance steps 

all the way to Clarion University 



Josh Woods 
Sports Editor 

sJlwoodsl@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Oct. 18 - Katie 
Cooper came to Clarion to 
continue her lifelong hobby 
of dance with her sister 
Stephanie on Clarion 
University's dance team. 

Katie Cooper, of Shaler 
High School near 

Pittsburgh, began dancing 
at the very young age of 
three years old and has been 
at it ever since. 

"My mom took me to sign 
up for Sandi McKissock's 
School of Dance when I was 
three," she recalled. "I 
stayed in it for fifteen years 
until now." 

While at Sandi's Cooper 
became well-versed in every 
aspect of dancing learning 
the arts of ballet, tap, jazz, 
lyrical and modern dance. 

"I enjoyed them all, but 
tap was definitely my 
favorite," she said looking 
up at the dance pictures 
adorning her wall. "They're 
all fun though; as long as 



I'm dancing I'm having fun." 

In August she began her 
Clarion dance experience, 
which she best describes as 
"not hip-hop and not jazz ... 
somewhere in between; stuff 
that you would hear on the 
radio." 

No sweat for Katie. With 
the guidance of Stephanie 
and the skills she learned at 
Sandi's Cooper fit right in. 
Soon it was time to attend 
dance camp with the team. 

"I was excited about per- 
forming at football, basket- 
ball and wrestling events 
and of course pep rallies," 
she said. 

But, first came the hard 
work and practice. The 
group traveled to Boston for 
the camp on the eve of this 
semester to learn and build 
in the skills necessary to 
produce the best possible 
performance. 

The camp went extremely 
well, especially considering 
they had only practiced a 
short while. As a matter of 
fact, they got right down to 
business placing second out 



of the four teams participat- 
ing. 

They also received the 
accolade of being "the most 
improved team in camp" 
and received a bid to nation- 
als. 

"It was nice to be a part 
of that and good to see that 
hard work pays off," said 
Cooper. "We're still deciding 
on whether or not to go to 
nationals because we have a 
lot of things to consider," she 
said, conceding that travel- 
ing considerations are at the 
top of that discussion. 

Until then Cooper is con- 
tinuing to work hard at each 
of the four practices held 
every week in the dance stu- 
dio within the confines of 
Tippin Gym., she said. 

"The best part of every- 
thing is the friendships that 
I have made and I really like 
performing. We are also 
under really good leader- 
ship; are captains are amaz- 
ing said Cooper, adding with 
a giggle, one of them is my 
sister; I love my sister so I 
gotta give her props." 



Battle of the Eagles: 

Golden Eagles shut out Bald Eagles 

16-0; snap three game losing streak 



Golf captures PSAC championship 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_ekbowser@clarion.edu 

HERSHEY, Oct. 15 - This 
past weekend the Clarion 
Golden Eagles golf team 
traveled to Wrendale 
Country Club in Hershey, 
Pa. to finish off their season 
in the Conference 

Championship Tournament. 

The Eagles finished first 
out of six teams narrowly 
beating lUP by just four 
strokes to bring home the 
Conference Title. 

The Eagles, Justin Moose 



who shot six over par for the 
two days tOok medalist hon- 
ors by finishing first overall. 

Moose was also named the 
MVP and was tied with 
lUP's Brian Galica for first 
overall after the tournament 
had ended, so the two need- 
ed playoff holes to deter- 
mine the individual champi- 
on and Moose prevailed on 
the second hole. 

Justin Moose was not the 
only Golden Eagle to have a 
good weekend. Of the top 
seven individual golfers in 
the tournament, four were 
from Clarion. 



Following the leaders 
were Golden Eagles CharUe 
Fitzsimmons and Tom Will. 
They finished in a tie for 
third place shooting 151 
only one stroke behind 
Justin Moose's winning 150. 
Justin Scott finished in a 
fifth place tie with a score of 
152. 

The team and head coach 
Al Lefevre had high expec- 
tations entering the two day 
tournament. 

See 'GOLF' page 11 



Ryan Cornman 

Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_rdcornman@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 15- Led by 
sophomore running back 
Michael Byrd, the Golden 
Eagles moved back into the 
win column with a shutout 
victory over Lock Haven 16- 
0, on Saturday night. 

Clarion raised its overall 
record to 3-4 and its PSAC- 
Western Division mark to 1- 
2. Lock Haven fell to 2-6 
overall and 0-3 in the con- 
ference. 

Clarion took a 7-0 lead 
early in the second quarter 
when Byrd (who rushed for 
90 yards) scored on a five- 
yard touchdown run, which 
was set up by teammate 
James Charles's block on a 
Lock Haven punt at their 



own 27-yard line. 

Charles also set up 
Clarion's second touchdown 
when he partially blocked 
another Lock Haven punt 
later in the second quarter. 

With good field position at 
hand, this time Charles had 
set up quarterback Eric 
Yonishin perfect position. 

Yonish's 50-yard scamper 
for a touchdown on the 
ensuing play gave Clarion a 
13-0 lead with around eight 
minutes left in the half 

Late in the third quarter 
yet another punt block, this 
time by Clarion's Jordan 
Hicks, was recovered by 
teammate Elijah Evans at 
the Lock Haven 10 yard 
line. The drive stalled, but 
the much aligned Kyle 
Snoke came on and booted a 
31 -yard field goal with 5: 11 



left in the third giving 
Clarion a 16-0 lead that 
they never relinquished. 

The shutout was Clarion's 
first since they did the same 
thing to Lock Haven in 
2001. 

Clarion totaled 269 yards 
of offense, including 172 
coming on the ground and 
remaining 97 coming 
through the air. Clarion's 
defense also came up big 
holding Lock Haven to only 
107 total yards of offense. 

Lock Haven heads home 
to face lUP, while Clarion 
travels to Shippensburg 
next Saturday, before 
returning Oct. 29 to 
Memorial Stadium to take 
on that same lUP team. 




Photo courtesy of John Thompson 
KICKER KYLE SNOKE - prepares for field goal duties on the sideline during Saturday night's 
game at Memorial Stadium versus Lock Haven. The Golden Eagles earned their first shut out of 
the season winning 16-0. 




Golden Eagles lose again 

•«• sports page la 



pauntings at Clarion 

9— HallowMn Features page 6 



One copy free 

f/ 




Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 





CALL 



Volume 91 Issue 8 



October 27, 2005 



^■A 






Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 



Bush lifts ban on 'prevail- 
ing wage' for Katrina work- 
ers 

WASHINGTON - Amid 
pressure from members of 
both parties, President 
Bush agreed Wednesday to 
lift an order that had 
allowed federal contractors 
on Hurricane Katrina 
reconstruction projects to 
pay workers less than the 
locally "prevailing wage." 

His decision elated 
democrats, labor unions 
and moderate House 
republicans from districts 
where organized labor is 
active. The reinstatement 
of the wage rules will take 
effect Nov. 8. 

Indians airlifted out of 
reserves in water-quality 
crisis 

TORONTO - Government 
authorities began an emer- 
gency airlift Wednesday to 
move more than 1,000 resi- 
dents from an impover- 
ished Indian reserve where 
drinking water was con- 
taminated by raw sewage. 

The abrupt evacuation 
order, after months of 
wrangling between govern- 
ment agencies, highlighted 
poor conditions on native 
reserves and questions 
about Canada's sewage dis- 
charge practices, which one 
environmental group called 
a "national disgrace." 

Once more from the top of 
the chart for Simpson 

Ashlee Simpson's sopho- 
more release, "I Am Me," 
entered the national album 
sales chart Wednesday at 
No. 1, making the singer 
two for two in chart-top- 
ping debuts. Her first 
album, "Autobiography," 
did the trick in June 2004. 

With sales of 220,000, "I 
Am Me" finished comfort- 
ably ahead of the No. 2 
album, Rod Stewart's 
"Thanks for the Memory - 
The Great American 
Songbook, Volume IV." The 
reformed British rocker's 
latest collection of pop 
standards tallied 193,000, 
according to Nielsen 
SoundScan. 

FDA to probe FDA chiefs 
abrupt departure 
WA SHINGTON- 
Lawmakers concerned and 
mystified about last 
month's sudden retirement 
of Food and Drug 
Administration 
Commissioner Lester 

Crawford may get some 
answers. 

In announcing his depar- 
ture less than three 
months after being con- 
firmed as commissioner, 
Crawford simply said he 
had determined it was time 
to move on. 

His lawyer, Barbara Van 
Gelder, said this week that 
Crawford has not been 
notified of any new inspec- 
tor general inquiry. In an e- 
mail, she also disputed 
reports that he had 
resigned and said Crawford 
had "retired." 



Shooting investigation continues 



John Santa 
News Editor 

sJmsanta@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Oct. 26 - 
Pennsylvania State Police 
filed an updated criminal 
complaint against Jason T. 
Vaughn, in connection with 
the home invasion that 
occurred at 285 B South 
Second Ave. on Oct. 19. 

The complaint was filed on 
Oct. 26 with the office of 
District Judge Dan George 
of the magisterial district 
18-3-04 in New Bethlehem, 
Pa. 

The updated criminal com- 
plaint consisted of a new list 
of charges brought against 
Vaughn. In addition, there 
is an affidavit of probable 
cause in relation to the inci- 
dent state police responded 
to on Oct. 19. Both the 
updated complaints and 
affidavit of probable cause 
were filed by Pennsylvania 
State Police Trooper Louis 
Davis, who responded to the 
crime scene on the night of 
Oct. 19. 

Updated Charges 

According to a news 
release obtained by The 
Clarion Call at the Oct. 21 
press conference held by 
state police, Jason T. 
Vaughn, 21, of Pittsburgh, 
Pa., was originally charged 
with five criminal acts. The 
updated criminal complaint 
alleged Vaughn committed 
nine offenses. 

Those charges alleged by 
Pennsylvania State Police 
are as follows^ burglary, rob- 
bery, criminal attempt and 
criminal conspiracy, all of 
which are first degree felony 
offenses. State police also 
alleged criminal conspiracy 
as a second degree felony, 
criminal trespass, a third 



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Melissa HoHler/TTie Clarion Call 

CRIME SCENE - A wndow ai 
the residence was allegedly 
broken during a horr)e inva- 
sion. 

degree felony; receiving 
stolen property, a third 
degree felony; theft by 
unlawful taking or disposi- 
tion, a third degree misde- 
meanor; and criminal mis- 
chief, which is classified as a 
summary offense. 

All of the aforementioned 
offenses charged against 
Vaughn are in direct corre- 
spondence with the affidavit 
of probable cause also filed 
on Oct. 26 by Davis and the 
Pennsylvania State Police 
Department. 

Affidavit of 
Probable Cause 

The affidavit of probable 
cause is an account of the 
incident on the night of Oct. 
19, as alleged by Davis. The 




Melissa Holller/The Clarion Call 

INVESTIGATION - State police responded to an alleged home 
invasion Oct. 19 on South Fifth Ave., which resulted in the death 
of a Clarion University student. Several charges have already 
been filed, but the investigation is ongoing. 



Kristopher Mills 

affidavit of probable cause is 
based upon interviews with 
Zachary C. Snyder and 
Christopher Rusnock, who 
are the residents of 285 B 
South Fifth Ave. 

According to Trooper 
Davis, he was assigned to 
respond to a report of a man 
"lying down face down in a 
yard on South Fifth 
Avenue." Upon Davis' 
arrival to the scene he was 
met by state police Trooper 
Hageter who reported that 
the victim had been moved 
by Clarion paramedic per- 
sonnel. Davis said that he 
observed the victim inside 
the ambulance and was 
advised that the victim 
would be transported to the 
hospital. The shooting vic- 
tim, Kristopher Mills, 21, of 
Pittsburgh, Pa., was later 
pronounced dead at Clarion 
Hospital. 

Snyder reported to Davis 
that two men dressed in 
black with their faces cov- 
ered entered his apartment 
through a side door which 
had been closed. Snyder 
alleged that he was 
approached by the intruders 
in his bedroom and was 
asked who was home. 
Snyder allegeded the two 
men took his cellular tele- 
phone from his hand and 
asked him to call his room- 
mates. 

Snyder then reported that 
the intruders allegedly led 
him around his apartment 
with his "hands up" with 
one of the men in front of 
him and one behind. Snyder 
said that the intruder who 
followed behind allegedly 
was, "poking something into 
his back." Snyder then 
alleged that he was led 
down a hallway to a locked 
closet. When the intruders 
allegedly asked if Snyder 
had a key to the closet, he 
informed them that he did 
not have a key. 

Snyder then alleged that 
he was led down the hall to 
the door of his roommate 
See 'INVESTIGATION' or) page 3 



Press conference held 



John Santa 
News Editor 

sjmsanta@clarion.eclu 



CLARION, Oct. 21 -A news 
conference pertaining to the 
Oct. 19 shooting, which 
resulted in the death of 
Clarion University student 
Kristopher Mills, was held 
on Oct. 21, at 1 p.m. in the 
Health Science and 
Education Center located on 
Main Street in Clarion. 

Trooper Jamie K. Levier, 
public information officer 
with the Pennsylvania State 
Pohce, and Mark Aaron, 
Clarion County district 
attorney, released a state- 
ment pertaining to the inci- 
dent and then fielded ques- 
tions from the assembled 
media and members of 
Mills' family 

State police are currently 
in the process of investigat- 
ing a case, according to the 
news release compiled by 
state police and read aloud 
by Levier, which involved a 
home invasion and homicide 
on South Fifth Avenue in 
Clarion Township. 

The case, according to 
Levier, involved, "...two 
Clarion University students 
entering the residence of 
two other university stu- 
dents, ensuing a confronta- 
tion that included the dis- 
play of firearms and ulti- 
mately resulted in one of the 
men dying as a result of a 
gunshot wound." 

According to District 
Attorney Aaron, "The esti- 
mated time of death was 
8:30 p.m., and Mills was 
still alive when he was 
taken to the hospital ... he 
either died on the way to the 
hospital or at the hospital." 

Jason T. Vaughn, 21, of 
Pittsburgh, Pa., and Mills, 
according to Levier, "went to 
the residence of Zachary 
Snyder and Christopher 
Rusnock and committed a 
home invasion. In the com- 
mission of this home inva- 
sion handguns were drawn, 
gunfire erupted and Mills 
was struck in the back." 

As a result of the afore- 
mentioned investigation by 
state police, Jason T. 
Vaughn was charged with 
burglary, robbery, criminal 
conspiracy (robbery) and 
criminal conspiracy (aggra- 
vated assault). All are first 
degree felony offenses. 



Vaughn was also charged 
with criminal trespass, 
which is a third degree 
felony offense. 

"We base these charges on 
information that we have 
received," said Levier, "We 
have enough evidence to 
charge what we have." 

As Levier and Aaron field- 
ed questions from those in 
attendance, members of 
Mills' family voiced their 
concerns with the charges 
and the manner in which 
they were being investigat- 
ed. The members of Mills' 
family in attendance includ- 
ed his mother, Chris 
McCord; step-father, 

Richard McCord; and aunt, 
Peg Rivers. 

Rivers questioned the offi- 
cials as to why the parents 
were denied the opportunity 
see Mills' body when they 
arrived in Clarion the night 
of the incident. 

"If it's a home invasion, 
why were the police not 
called; why did it take some- 
one else finding his body to 
have the police called?" 
asked Rivers. 

"I know it wasn't 
Kristopher, nothing adds up 
here, nothing at all. There 
was no' reason for him to be 
in that house, nothing at all. 
There was no reason for him 
to take nothing from 
nobody; we provided him 
with everything," said 
Richard McCord, "There is 
something that's not right, 
there is something not right 
with these guys not calling 
[police]." 

Trooper Levier and 
District Attorney Aaron 
were unable to respond to 
these allegations, as they 
cited that their investiga- 
tion was still ongoing. 

"I wish I had a crystal ball 
to answer this question," 
said Aaron, "things like that 
are things that we hope to 
explain over the course of 
the investigation." 

Autopsy and ballistic 
reports from the crime scene 
were still pending at the 
time of the press conference. 
Clarion University 
President Dr. Joseph 
Grunenwald, Vice President 
of Student and University 
Affairs Harry Tripp and 
Executive Director of 
Student and University 
Relations Center Ron 
Wilshire were in atten- 
dance. 



Educator speaks about 'No Child Left Behind' 



Brittnee Koebler 
Assistant Editor 

s_bekoebler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 25 - Dr. 
Gerald Bracey spoke to stu- 
dents and fellow educators, 
in Still Hall, about the 
impact of international com- 
parisons and the No Child 
Left Behind Act (NCLB). 

Bracey, a graduate of 
the College of William and 
Mary and Stanford 
University, opened up the 
lecture by mentioning the 
article, "Johnny's Terrible 
SATs." This story led him to 
re.<?earrh the SAT.s be 



He found the average scores 
to be derived from an elite 
group of students. 

Bracey followed this 
study with the publication 
of "Why Can't They Be Like 
We Were?", which drew the 
attention of large newspa- 
pers such as the New York 
Times, Washington Post, 
Education Week and USA 
Today. Bracey received 
more information after this 
publication. This led to his 
second publication "The 
Second Bracey Report on 
the Condition of Public 
Education," which was pub- 
hshed in the "Phi Delta 



Kn 



nnan 



Fnllf 



tbit 



yearly report. In the 
October "Kappan," the 15th 
Bracey Report was pub- 
lished. 

Bracey published many 
more pieces on this topic 
and summarized most of his 
findings in his 1997 book, 
"Setting the Record 
Straight: Responses to 
Misconceptions About 

Public Education in 
America." This book exam- 
ines 20 common myths 
about American schools. 

The audience laughed at 
Bracey's humorous, yet 
thought provoking com- 
ments. His lecture con- 

tainpH varinns mintatinrts 




Melissa Holller/r/ie Clarion Call 
SPEAKER ON EDUCATION - Dr. Gerald Bracey visited Clarion 
University on Oct. 25 where he discussed "No Child Left 



Mta^dMa 



Page 2 



Tlffi CUkMON CALL 



October 27. 2005 



I 



lews 



Faculty Senate recognizes student death at recent meeting 




Jeffry Richards 

Assistant Circulation Manager 

sJprichards@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 24 - On 
Monday Oct. 24, the Faculty 
Senate met in Hart Chapel. 
Most of the meeting focused 
on the recent death of a 
Clarion student as well as 
some old business involving 
strategic planning. 

The meeting began by not- 
ing the tragic loss of the 
Clarion student about a 
week ago, Kristopher Mills, 
21, of Pittsburgh. Along 
with that there were 
announcements of several 
speakers appearing at 
Clarion in the near future, 
as well as some other meet- 
ings that will take place and 
an announcement about the 



nominations for Honorary 
Degree Committee. 

President Joseph 

Grunenwald also brought 
up the subject of the off- 
campus shooting that 
resulted in the death of a 
Clarion student Mills. He 
stated that a loss of life is 
tragic, but life has to go on. 
He has been in touch with 
the student's family, and he 
said he will provide law 
enforcement with any assis- 
tance the university can 
provide, but for now it is an 
on-going investigation, and 
things are still vague at the 
moment. 

"We are taking actions not 
only with the police, but of 
our own as well, said 
Grunenwald. Still, he is 
avoiding any public com- 
ment about the incident 
until he is provided with 
any further information 
from police and the district 
attorney. He did however 
note that the police are 
being "very aggressive" on 



the matter. He then asked 
the faculty to report any- 
thing they hear or any stu- 
dent who is especially affect- 
ed by the incident to the 
appropriate people. 

With that there were ques- 
tions about the arming of 
on-campus security. 

Grunenwald replied by 
telling the faculty that the 
on-campus patrols carry 
arms when necessary, and 
that, since April of last year, 
it has seemed appropriate 
that they should not be dis- 
armed. 

Grunenwald encouraged 
people to attend Dr. Gerald 
Bracey's presentation. He 
then moved on to the subject 
of his up coming visit to 
Harrisburg to discuss budg- 
ets with the Board of 
Governors. A preliminary 
budget has been made, and 
he said it may be a good 
thing that discussions have 
begun earlier than usual. 
There is still about a $50 
million hole to be filled by 



tuitions and appropriations. 

Afterwards, there were 
inquiries about the work 
happening on campus, 
specifically the work in front 
of Carlson Library. One fac- 
ulty member had heard 
rumors that the work was 
primarily aesthetic and 
asked if it was an appropri- 
ate use of resources. 
Grunenwald responded by 
saying that he could not 
"make an intelligent com- 
ment" about the matter at 
this time, and that he will 
investigate the matter to see 
just what was happening. 
Another faculty member 
spoke out saying the aes- 
thetics of the university are 
still important. 

The next matter to be 
addressed was the Dean 
searches. There are current- 
ly phone interviews sched- 
uled with several people to 
take over the opening dean 
positions. 

In old business, the topic 
of discussion was strategic 



planning, which took up a 
bulk of the meeting. 
Grunenwald is encouraging 
people from different 
departments to begin dis- 
cussing ways to bring the 
departments together in 
order to provide better class- 
es and/or offer more minors 
and majors. The senate dis- 
cussed ways for this to hap- 
pen. Grunenwald said that 
it starts with some people 
from departments to start 
talking, then to take it to 
the department chairs. He 
even threw out the idea of 
talking to faculty from other 
universities. He would like 
to see the walls between the 
different colleges on campus 
and departments broken 
down. There was some skep- 
tisism from other senate 
members. 

One senate member said 
that the faculty may not be 
"cultured" to interact 
between departments. He 
said it may be harder than it 
seems because they are not 



used to the idea. 
Grunenwald rebutted by 
saying that there are models 
to follow that have been suc- 
cessful in the past and 
brought higher full-time 
enrollments to not only one 
department, but in some 
instances both. He also 
claimed that they are not 
here to "count beans" but for 
the students. He is encour- 
aging faculty to get out and 
start talking with depart- 
ments within the college fac- 
ulty to faculty, which is the 
start. He is hoping for them 
to begin asking each other, 
"What can we do together?" 
In new business, the pre- 
dominate topic was of "Turn 
It In," the anti-plagiarism 
program. The senate was 
asking for volunteers to help 
work on doing what needs to 
be done in order for the pro- 
gram to work, including 
training faculty on it, defin- 
ing plagiarism for each 
department and working on 
including it in the syllabi. 



Mayoral 

candidate 

Stroup 

addresses 

student 

senate 



Dan Edington 
Managing Editor 

CLARION, Oct. 24 - 
Student senate's eighth 
meeting of the fall 2005 
semester addressed motions 
for money allocation and 
was visited by republican 
mayoral candidate John R. 
Stroup, who addressed stu- 
dents about plans to use dia- 
logue to help improve uni- 
versity/community rela- 
tions. 

"There's always a growing 
need for a relationship 
between the community and 
the college," said Stroup. 

Stoup also cited safety, 
recreational options and 
university/community rela- 
tions as needs he felt should 
be addressed. 

Senate approved alloca- 
tion of $549 to the Clarion 
University Theatre for a 
new compounding saw in a 
21-0-0 vote. However, a 
motion to allocate about 
$740 to Students for Life for 
a trip, failed in a vote of 7- 
14-0. 

A committee to review cur- 
riculum changes will be 
meeting twice. The meet- 
ings will be heald on Nov. 10 
and 17 in 250-252 Gemmell. 
This meeting is open to all 
students. 

All recognized student 
organizations (RSOs) whose 
names begin with the letters 
N-Z were required to turn in 
their constitutions to stu- 
dent senate's rules, regula- 
tions, and policies commit- 
tee. Out of 65 RSOs, 10 have 
turned in their constitu- 
tions. All RSOs have until 
Monday, Oct. 31 to submit 
their constitutions before 
action will be taken against 
them. 

Clarion's student senate is 
currently working with 
Venengo campus's student 
serkators to have a represen- 
tative from each organiza- 
tion attending each other's 
meetings. 



Clarion facuity presents at PAC-TE annuai assembiy 



Katie Fischer 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kcfischer@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 24 - The 
Pennsylvania Association of 
College Teacher Education 
(PAC-TE) held its 34 Annual 
Teacher Education 

Assembly in Grantville with 
three of Clarion University's 
faculty members in atten- 
dance. 

Dr. Elaine Carbone, Dr. 
Patricia Kolencik and Dr. 
Sally Sentner attended and 
presented at the conference, 



which was held Oct. 12-14. 
PAC-TE holds the academic 
conference annually as a 
way of sharing ideas and 
workshops with other uni- 
versity professors across the 
state. 

The assembly's premise 
and title was "Setting the 
Educational Agenda: 

Addressing Initiatives, 
Challenges and Changes." 
Each of the professors pre- 
sented a different topic at 
the assembly. 

Carbone, a mathematics 
professor, teamed up with 
two other professors: Dr. 



Steve Williams from Lock 
Haven University of 
Pennsylvania and Dr. 
Colleen Willard Holt from 
Pennsylvania State 

University at Harrisburg. 
Together they presented a 
seminar titled "Changing 
the Way Teacher Education 
Programs are Developed: An 
Innovative Attempt at 
Merging Content and 
Pedagogy." 

Kolencik, an assistant pro- 
fessor of education, present- 
ed her seminar "Preparing 
Students for Praxis Using 
My Access." Kolencik also 



helped out fellow professor 
Dr. Lois Larson, of Grove 
City College, by acting as a 
presider for her seminar, 
"Internationalizing the Pre- 
Service Teacher Educator: 
Developing a Professional 
Global Perspective." 

Sentner, associate profes- 
sor of special education and 
rehabilitative sciences, also 
partnered up with another 
professor to make her pres- 
entation. She and Dr. Jane 
Bray from Millersville 
University of Pennsylvania 
presented "Issues Related to 
Implementation: PA/ 



NCATE Partnership 

Agreement," a problem-solv- 
ing seminar. Sentner acted 
as a presider as well for Dr. 
Ann BergerKnorr's semi- 
nar "Lessons from Ms. 
Frizzle: Differentiated 

Instruction in the 

Elementary Classroom." 

Along with presentations, 
Sentner and. Kolencik both 
served on the 2005 Teacher 
Education Assembly 

Planning Committee. 

Sentner was also honored by 
being elected to serve on 
PAC-TE's Board of Directors 
during the assembly. 





Extend your semester - 

Enroll in MU*s 

Winter Session courses. 

December 1 9 - January 8 



The Clarion Call provides a synopsis of all criminal 
investigations as conducted by the Clarion University 
Public Safety for the month of October 2005. All infor- 
mation can be accessed on the Public Safety Web page. 

■ Danielle Reeve, 20, of Clarion, Pa., was arrested on 
Oct. 26, by a public safety officer on an arrest warrant 
issued by the Pennsylvania State Police. 

■ Oct. 20, an unknown person(s) removed a book bag 
from a vehicle while it was parked in Parking Lot 3. 
Anyone with information should contact public safety. 

■ Oct. 20, A resident of Nair Hall reported that their 
car had been vandalized at an unspecified time begin- 
ning on Oct. 13 to Oct. 14, in Parking Lot 3. Campus 
police are investigating. 



MU's Winter Session offers: 

» Undergraduate and graduate offerings 
» A variety of fornnats 

• Come to campus for a face-to-face course 

• Stay at home during break and take an online course 

•♦ Experience a blended delivery course - a mix of online 
and face-to-face 

» More than 35 course offerings 

» A great way to earn credits in a condensed time 




For more information, check out the Winter Session website at: 

www.millersville.edu/'-winter 



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A mcmbci of Pennsylvania's State- System of Higher Educjtjon 



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OCTOBER 27, 200S 



Tffi CLARION CALL 



Page 3 






'INVESTIGATION' cor)tlr)- 
ued from fror)t page 

Christopher Rusnock's bed- 
room. The door was locked 
and one of the intruders 
allegedly shouldered his 
way into the room, while the 
other intruder allegedly 
restrained Snyder. Snyder 
then heard gunshots and 
fled the house, as did the 
two intruders. 

When Rusnock was ques- 
tioned by Davis, he said that 
he went to bed early and 
locked his door on the night 
of Oct. 19. Rusnock report- 
ed that he heard voices that 
he recognized in the hall, 
one of which belonged to an 
individual who had alleged- 
ly been threatening him. 
Rusnock also said that he 
heard the voice of Snyder 
and Snyder sounded "scared 
for his life," which caused 
Rusnock to go to his closet, 
where he allegedly found his 
handgun. 

Rusnock then alleged that 
one of the unidentified 
intruders broke into his 
room and said, "Break your- 
self, fool." According to the 
affidavit of probable cause, 
the intruder allegedly 
cocked his weapon and 
Rusnock alleged that the 
intruder fired several shots. 
Rusnock remained in his 
bedroom until he no longer 
heard any voices. When the 



crime scciu' was quiet he 
ran outside of his residence 
to a nearby fraternity house. 
Rusnock said he believed 
that his gunshots did not hit 
anyone. 

The alleged weapon used 
by the intruders in the home 
invasion belonged to Mark 
A. Brentley II who, in a 
statement to police, said he 
entertained Mills and 
Vaughn at his residence ear- 
lier on Oct. 19. 

On Oct. 20, Brentley 
reported to the 

Pennsylvania State Police 
Barracks in Clarion that he 
discovered that his firearm 
was missing earlier that 
day. Brentley alleged that 
either Mills or Vaughn had 
stolen his handgun on 
Oct. 19. 

Brentley consented to a 
search of his apartment, 
and that he gave Vaughn a 
ride to Pittsburgh on Oct. 
19. 

At the time of Brentley's 
statement he was still in 
possession of Vaughn's car. 
The automobile was seized 
by state police. 

According to the affidavit 
of probable cause, on Oct. 
20, Vaughn phoned state 
police and stated that he 
was with Mills at 285 B 
South Fifth Avenue. 

Davis reports in the affi- 
davit of probable cause that, 
"They parked a street or 
more away and that their 



intentions at first were to 
buy cocaine. He stated that 
changed after Snyder told 
them there wasn't any 
there." 

Vaughn alleged that Mills, 
"would not take no for an 
answer and shouldered in 
Rusnock's door." Vaughn 
allegedly heard shots but 
did not know who was 
shooting. Vaughn alleged 
that Mills fell in the hallway 
and dropped the gun, which 
Vaughn recognized as 
belonging to Brentley. 

Vaughn then stated that 
he picked up the firearm 
and jumped out the window. 
Vaughn told police that he 
lost the gun "somewhere" 
and that he was scared. 
Vaughn said that he learned 
later that Mills had been 
shot. 

Vaughn said that he want- 
ed to return to Clarion to 
give a statement to state 
police officials. In his 
report, Davis indicates that 
arrangements were made 
for Vaughn to do so. 

"That's all that's available 
at this time," said 
Pennsylvania State Police 
Trooper Public Information 
Officer Jamie K. Levier. "We 
are still analyzing the evi- 
dence that will answer the 
unanswered questions." 

Autopsy and ballistic 
reports are still pending and 
no additional charges have 
been filed by state police. 



'BRACET cont/nued 
from front page 



and editorials. Bracey also 
included headlines from 
USA Today, Washington 
Post, Wall Street Journal 
and Science Monitor. 

Bracey spoke about The 
Seven Deadly Absurdities of 
NCLB. Within this seg- 
ment, Bracey stated seven 
points that summed up his 
opinion and views on NCLB. 



In one of Bracey's 
points, he declared that 
even those who beUeve in 
punishment would not use it 
in the way that NCLB does. 
"Entire schools get punished 
for failures of a few," said 
Bracey. 

Bracey also said that 
the time frame of 2014 is a 
ridiculous expectation to 
attain 100 percent efficien- 
cy 

In addition, Bracey list- 
ed qualities that are not 
measured by tests. Some of 



these qualities were creativ- 
ity, enthusiasm, persistence, 
empathy and integrity. 

"It's [NCLB] all based 
on test scores alone. It all 
comes down to test scores 
and it's absurd," said 
Bracey. 

Bracey has been hon- 
ored as the Outstanding 
Educator of 2001 by the 
Horace Mann League, and 
also received The John 
Dewey Award in 2003 from 
the Vermont Society for the 
Study of Education. 



Bush 
shows up 
for plane 
dedication 



Steve Chawkins and 
Edwin Chen 

Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

SIMl VALLEY, Calif. Oct. 
21 — In a sentimental trib- 
ute. President Bush showed 
up at the Ronald Reagan 
Presidential Library Friday 
to dedicate a permanent 
museum display of the 
Boeing 707 used by the 40th 
president as his flying 
White House. 

In a cavernous building 
that virtually doubles the 
library's size, the retired Air 
Force One served as a back- 
drop for a speech in which 
Bush likened Reagan's suc- 
cessful challenge of commu- 
nism with his own battles 
against Islamic terrorists. 

Pointing out that the 
gleaming jet was the one 
that flew Reagan to Berlin 
for his famous plea to "tear 
down this wall," Bush drew 
enthusiastic applause from 
the crowd of some 500 invit- 
ed guests. 

"The key to victory lay in 
our resolve to stay in the 
fight till the fight was won," 
Bush told the cheering audi- 
ence, which was peppered 
with former Reagan staffers 
and Republican dignitaries. 
Like communism, he said, 
"Islamic radicalism is 
doomed to fail." 

As president, Bush has 
rarely attended ribbon-cut- 
ting ceremonies. The last 




Brian Vander Brug/ Los Angeles Times 
REAGAN - President Bush and first lady Laura Bush with Nancy 
Reagan, the widow of the late President Reagan, at the Air 
Force One Pavilion at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in 
Si mi Valley, Calif. 



time was more than four 
years ago, in San Antonio, at 
the dedication of the San 
Jose Mission. But styling 
himself as Reagan's political 
heir. Bush made the cross- 
country trip to Simi Valley 
with first lady Laura Bush 
and shared the platform 
with Reagan's widow Nancy. 
The 84-year-old former 
first lady spoke briefly, 
praising officials at the 
library for their dedication 
in making the jet a walk- 
through showpiece devoted 
to her husband's memory. 
Emblazoned with a U.S. flag 
and the words United States 
of America, the 52-passen- 
ger jet served the seven 
chief executives from Jimmy 
Carter to, briefly, George W 
Bush. But Reagan with his 
two-term presidency used it 
the most. 

'The completion of this 
project is the realization of 
Ronnie's dreamt to attract 
individuals from ail walks of 
life to his library so they 
might learn about the presi- 
dency and American leader- 
ship in the world," Nancy 
Reagan said. 

The plane carried Richard 
M. Nixon on his historic trip 



to China and ferried him to 
California after he resigned 
the presidency in disgrace. 
Gerald Ford famously tum- 
bled down its last four steps 
on a trip to Salzburg, 
Austria. It transported 
Reagan more than 630,000 
miles on 211 missions to 26 
countries. 

With its three sets of 
wheels resting on concrete 
pedestals and its nose point- 
ed toward an immense glass 
wall, the old Air Force One 
dominates its airy, three- 
level building. The pavilion 
opens to the public at 10 
a.m. Monday. 

Inside the 33-year-old 
plane, visitors filing through 
can see Reagan's flight jack- 
et casually draped over a 
chair, his Fax machine, an 
old-fashioned dial telephone 
all everydav items endowed 
with the aura of history. 
Reagan's celebrated speech 
at the Berlin Wall is tucked 
into the carriage of a 
Selectric II typewriter. 

On a writing desk beside a 
window are undated, hand- 
written letters to ordinary 
people that Reagan wrote on 
a yellow legal pad. 




Registration begins Monday, October 17 

For the first time. Clarion University is offering a winter intersession between the fall and spring semesters. All courses offered in the 
session will be delivered on-line. Students do not need to be on campus to take a class. It is expected there will be a variety of 
courses offered but the exact list of courses will not be available for a few weeks. This is a separate term like the summer pre-session. 
There is a separate tuition charge but no additional financial aid will be available. Students are only permitted to take one class. 
Classes begin Monday, December 19, after the last day of the fall semester examinations and run until Januaiy 9, 2006. 




Winter Intersession offerinys 



Because most of the university will be closed for pari of this session, no 
on-campus library or student services will be provided. Office services (registrar, 
bursar, financial aid, computing services, etc.) will be limited and not available for 
one week in the middle of the term. Credit/No Record will not be available during 
this term. Drop/Add period is December 20-22. 

Students from other universities and institutions interested in taking a winter 
intersession course should contact the Admissions office at 814-393-2306 or 
e-mail at http://wwvv.clarion.edu/adniiss/ and click on 
http://www.clarioii.edu/registrar/pdfs/WinterIntersessionforin.pdf 
to fill out a "Quick Admit" form. 

Graduate applicants CANNOT use the quick admit form. Click on 
www.clarion.edu/graduatestudies/apply.shtinl for more information. 

If you have any questions concerning winter intersession. contact Lynne Fleisher 
at 814-393-2778 or ineisher@clarlon.edu. 

NOTE: Fail 2005 }>rading hMI not l)e completed until 12/22/05. Students seeking 
information on grade .status before 12/22/05 should contact their instructor directly. 



Clarion I nuervily is an aHinnativc at lion cqiijl iippmluniiy employer. 



Class Description 

AE 1 00 College Reading Study Skills 

AE 260 Career Exploration & Planning 

COMM 441 Advanced Media Writing 

ES 1 1 1 Basic Earth Science 

ED 620 Internet Applications K-12 Educators 

HPE m Health Education 

LS 601 Developing Library Collections 

LS 532 Mgmt. of School Library Media Centers 

LS 577 Libraries, Literature, and the Child 

PSY 1 1 1 Psychology of Personal Grov>/th 

PSY 21 1 Introduction to Psychology 

REHB 58 1 Rehabilitation of those living with HIV/ AIDS 



instructor 

Staff 

Staff 

Lingv^all 

Vega 

McCullough 

English 

Horhai 

Staff 

Harhdi 

Haynes 

Vilberg 

Kitwein 



Courses highlighted in gray are pending CCPS Approval. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 



*I N C ■ I • t7 



^^^» 



Page 4 



THE CLARION CALL 



October 27. 2005 



tfliitl 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex, Clarion, PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

Web: clarioncall.olarion.edu E-mail: calt^clarion.edu 

Executive Board 



Tom McMeekin, 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dan Edington, 
Managing Editor 

John Santa, 
News Editor 

Ashley E. Angle, 
Features Editor 

Josh Woods, 
Sports Editor 

Jeannette Good, 
Copy & Design Editor 



Melissa Hollier, 
Photography Editor 

Jamie Ranagan, 
Business Manager 

Chelsey Hummel, 
Ad Sales Manager 

Ashley Boynes, 
Advertising Designer 

Tina Sickler, 
On-line Editor 

Paul Anderson, 
Circulation Manager 



Staff 

Lorie Abraham, Ryan Aloia, Ambri Alexander, Jennifer Angeloa, 
Michael Balchin, Kerri Ballina, David Banks, Adam Bauer, Eddie 
Baumcratz, Jason Bice, Elisa Borger, Eric Bowser. Kurt Boyd, 
Brandi Brady, Katie Bullers. Daniel Burr, Kimberly Cammuso, 
Ashley Carter, TVler Crissman, Jonathan Cofer, Kevin Colonna, 
Ryan Cornman, Lisa Covington, Brandon Devennie, Hilary Dieter, 
Jonathan Donelli, Jeffrey Donston, Jonathan Egbert, Ijori Elmquist, 
Katie Fischer, Audrey Fiske, Danielle Gaie, Shawn Clancy, Lindsay 
Grystar, Grant Herrnberger, Chris Hofer, Robyn Holz, Sara Hoover, 
Andy Johnson, Jennifer Kalgren, Emma Kelly, Beth Kibler, Brittnee 
Koebler, Jason Kooser, Shasta Kurtz, Joe Kuszaj, Lauren Macek, 
Michael Marcello, Chris McKissick, Nicole Meyer, Heather Moore, 
Megan Mullins, Karen Nicodemus, Cheyenne Patterson, Mollie 
Pifer, Morris Pratt, Elizabeth Fresutti, Gayathri Rajendran, Zach 
Ramsey, Stephanie Rawson, Ryan Rhoades, Jeffry Richards, Sarah 
Roesch, Roberta Rosati, Lisa Sagan, Lindsey Schnieder, Jared 
Sheatz, Jennifer Shetter, Melody Simpson, Nathan Stahlman, 
Kristen Staley, Darrell Stanyard, Marc Steigerwald, Tbm 
Steinhagen, Lindsay Sturgeon, Kirwin Sutherland, Matt Topoleki, 
Steve Trichtinger, Ariel Weaver, Kevin Wetter, Pam Wherry, Amber 
White, Jimi Wikander, Ryan Wolfe, Devon Yorkshire, Jessica 
Zelinsky 

Policies 

The Clarion Call is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
Call is published most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve the 
right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation, and obscenity; 
the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editorin- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. They 
must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author of a let- 
ter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a separate letter 
of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based on 
available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
PubHcation is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a mem- 
ber of The Call staff. They should schedule their co'curricular when 
scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsibilities 
for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the Clarion 
Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One copy 
is free; additional copies are $1.00. 

■ Opinions expressed in this publica- 
tion are those of the writer or speaker, 
and do not necessarily reflect the opin- 
ions of the newspaper staff, student 
body, Clarion University or the com- 
munity. 




Religion In America 

Some of the tenets of our 
nation-promoting religion 
have been on parade recent- 
ly. Last month, Christian 
minister Pat Robertson 
shared that America should 
have assassinated the presi- 
dent of Venezuela. And in a 
recent speech to raise troop 
enlistments. President Bush 
stated that an American's 
"highest calling" is to serve 
in the military. 

Our spiritual appeals for 
revenge killing and military 
service are nearing those 
adopted by advocates of 
"Liberation Theology" in 
Central America, where 
imagep of Jesus Christ bran- 
dishing an uplifted machine 
gun were portrayed on road- 
side billboards. 



Government officials will 
surely seek their own inter- 
ests and too often it has 
been in their interests to 
claim and, more dangerous- 
ly, believe that through their 
efforts God is establishing 
his reign on Earth. And 
often Jesus, a homeless, 
kingdom-not-of-this-world 
preaching, murdered Jew 
has been made the poster 
boy to justify rebellion, 
material abundance and 
national expansion. 

In America in the 1770s, 
Calvinist ministers told 
colonists that by rebelling 
from England, taking up 
arms and shooting redcoats, 
they were doing God's will. 
Quakers were prosecuted 
for disagreeing. A Western 
nation's ace-in-hole is to 
unite their country's growth 
with "God's Will." But in the 
New Testament Jesus isn't 
uniting with any state- 
including America. 

We should reject the 
manipulative, Ameri-Jesus 



Editorial, kMa lo the Eililor iiiiil I iill iin \iiu 



The new responsibilities of Ciarion students 




John Santa 
News Editor 

sJmsanta@clarion.edu 



By now the various rumors 
have circulated as to the 
events that happened last 
Wednesday night on South 
Fifth Avenue, and the 
hordes of news crews that 
descended upon our little 
college town have left, going 
back to Pittsburgh or the 
surrounding area, to admin- 
ister a black eye to Clarion 
University that will take a 
long time to heal. 

The circumstances that 
took the life of Clarion 
University senior 

Kristopher Mills are still 
very sketchy and can only 
be described as horribly 
tragic and devastating. It 
cannot be said enough that 
the hearts and prayers of 
the Clarion University com- 
munity undoubtedly go out 
to the family and friends of 
Kristopher Mills. One true 
statement that can be 
inferred out of these horri- 
ble events is that Kristopher 
was loved dearly by his fam- 
ily and friends. He will defi- 
nitely be missed. 

Clarion University also 
lost another member of its 
family, Patrick Ryan, a 
graduate student, who mys- 
teriously went missing on , 
Aug. 13. According to police 
his body was found on Aug. 
23 in Forest County and 
local and state officials are 
still investigating the tragic 
events surrounding 

Patrick's death. 

While following this story, 
I have gotten to know 
Patrick's mother, Mrs. 
Debra Ryan, and a more 
tragic event could not have 
happened to a more kind 
and compassionate woman 
and family. Again, the 
hearts and prayers go out to 
the people affected by 






Patrick's death; by all 
accounts he was a wonderful 
and intelligent person. 

It is no secret that Clarion 
University has fallen on 
hard times lately. The 
recent nightmarish 

tragedies associated with 
Clarion are only worsened 
by the current budget cuts 
that the administration 
was forced to hand down 
earlier this semester. The 
cuts have weighed heavily 
on everyone affiliated with 
this university either by 
employment or enrollment. 
Professors have not been 
rehired; departments do not 
have enough money to 
spend on supplies like 
paper, and unfortunately, 
the party that is affected the 
most by these cuts is us, the 
student body. 

So, as the student body 
deals with the loss of 
Kristopher and Patrick com- 
pounded with the effects of 
an education experience 
that is deteriorating right 
under our noses, we the stu- 
dents have also inherited a 
new responsibility. 

The students of Clarion 
should, for once, be proac- 
tive. We do not have to sit 
; back and watch our univer- 
(Sity crumble around us. We 
can'tielp^and it is relatively 
painless to do. 

When we are away from 
Clarion; out student teach- 
ing or interning or visiting 
the brave new world, brag 
about the good things that 
still remain at Clarion 
University; trust me, there 
is still a lot. 

Talk about our distin- 
guished professors who 
remain. Most of them are 
doing very exciting work, 
some of which may even be 
on a national level. 

For instance, Dr. Sally 
Sentner, an assistant pro- 



fessor of special education 
and rehabilitative sciences, 
Dr. Elaine Carbone a profes- 
sor of mathematics and Dr. 
Patricia Kolencik, assistant 
professor of education, have 
recently attended the 34th 
Annual Teacher Education 
Assembly sponsored by the 
Pennsylvania Association of 
Colleges and Teacher 
Educators. 

Sentner, Carbone and 
Kolencik either presided 
over or presented sessions 
at the assembly that were 
attended by members of the 
education community from 
all over the state of 
Pennsylvania. 

Also, Dr. Kevan Yenerall, 
an associate professor of 
political science at Clarion, 
taught at Princeton 
University in June and July. 
Yenerall taught an 
Advanced Placement (AP) 
style class to 30 high school 
students from all over the 
United States. 

Talk about our distin- 
guished alumni. Our alum- 
ni are doing amazing work, 
as well, in many different 
fields all over the United 
States and the world. 

Alumni like, PJ (Magaro) 
Hilbert of New York, N.Y., 
who graduated from Clarion 
with a degree in business 
administration. Hilbert is 
currently a senior vice pres- 
ident with JPMorganChase 
Treasury and Securities 
Services and was recently 
named Global Client Service 
Executive for Worldwide 
Securities Services. 

Or maybe alumni like 
Jeffrey James of Fairfax, 
Va., who graduated from 
Clarion with an education 
degree, and is currently a 
Special Agent with the U.S. 
Secret Service. For the last 
two years, James has been 
assigned to the Presidential 
Protective Detail. He is one 
of the agents who guards 
President George W. Bush. 

Most everyone in the 
Clarion community knows 
about Reggie Wells, who 
majored in communication 
at Clarion and is currently 
one of the most impressive 
young offensive linemen in 
the National Football 



League. Wells, now a full 
time starter at left guard for 
the Arizona Cardinals, con- 
tinues to excel on the 
gridirons of the NFL as he 
did at Memorial Stadium. 

Lastly, talk about the cur- 
rent student body. I would 
bet that any member of the 
administration or faculty 
would tell you that we are 
the most important and 
impressive aspect of Clarion 
University. 

We have many amazing 
organizations such as STAR 
(Students Together Again.st 
Rape), which works closely 
with SAFE and PASSAGES 
to sponsor events and point 
victims of rape and sexual 
and physical abuse in the 
direction of counseling. 

Our sports teams are also 
very impressive; the Men's 
Golf team just won a presti- 
gious PSAC title on Oct. 15. 

Don't think of this as only 
showing blind support for 
Clarion University to help it 
get out of its current funk. 
Think of this as an invest- 
ment in your future. 

Dr. Grunenwald, Clarion 
University President, and 
Dr. Nolan, Provost of 
Clarion University, pointed 
out in the beginning of the 
year in their annual, "Fall 
Faculty Assembly Address" 
that enrollment is down and 
current trends pertaining to 
the positive images of com- 
munity colleges and other 
state owned institutions 
point to the further decline 
of enrollment of first time 
college students and trans- 
fers. 

Like it or not this is the 
problem of the student body 
and a negative image sur- 
rounding the university can 
only hurt us. So, as we are 
still consumed with grief 
and as we continue to 
mourn the losses of 
Kristopher Mills and 
Patrick Ryan, look around 
and also acknowledge the 
amazing parts of Clarion 
that are still with us. We 
owe Clarion's good name to 
ourselves and to them. 

The author is a senior com- 
munication major and News 
Editor of The Call. 



battle cries. And it's neither 
my faith's nor my country's 
"highest calling" to enlist 
and fight in an Iraqi war 
against those who had noth- 
ing to do with 9/11 (and 
largely ignore the ones that 
really did). 

The great beneficiaries of 
this circus are certain corpo- 
rate elements here- like 
Haliburton, an ongoing gov- 
ernment-sponge corporation 
that has been fined for over- 
billing the U.S. on military 
contracts. Dick Cheney was 
its former CEO. 

Eisenhower warned us 
repeatedly about the bad 
influence of U.S. 

military/industrial powers 
and Teddy Roosevelt stated 
that war profiteering was 
treason! But unfortunately 
many Christians would 
cheer for the devil himself 
as long as he claimed to be 
God's nationalistic agent 
against decadence and liber- 
alism (claims made by Bin 
Laden, Hitler and Pharisaic 
Priests). Many recognize 
and reject our country's dan- 
gerous, twisted version of 
Christianity. Unfortunately 
many others will continue to 
support it with their lives 
and votes. 

- John FairboDka, 
Former CU student and 
current Clarion resident 



Students practice what they preach? 




Lisa Covington 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ldcovington@clarion.edu 



During my siesta from 
"Speak Loudly," I found 
myself remembering my days 
as a high school senior: ener- 
gized, thrilled to graduate 
and apprehensive about the 
next chapter of, what I call, 
my "book of life." 

I see myself, as I did four 
years ago, with variations 
through pages of my experi- 
ences. These feelings enhance 
when I am around first-year 
students. 

Since I last wrote, this has 
been on my mind, and I have 
discovered that people are 
"the same" too. I'm not saying 
your French professor is 
exactly the same person who 
taught you eighth grade 
English, but the setting and 
situations may be similar 



Individuals are a collection of 
their experiences; they are 
not necessarily the people 
they were when you met 
them, and they may not be 
who they are today for their 
entire lives. 

An example of this would be 
this year's activities day — 
people from different organi- 
zations came to one place to 
meet with their peers from 
the year before. This can be 
adapted to real world situa- 
tions: the university recruits 
students, who then watch 
(and possibly listen) to facul- 
ty, the students initially live 
in dorms and faculty reside in 
their office. 

After watching this circle- 
happen right before my eyes, 
I realize there are several 
groups on campus. All of them 
have goals, so why not join 
one? All of these organiza- 
tions vary, they all want to 
recruit you and are often self- 
segregated by the groups' 
members. 

As years pass during mem- 
bership, take a look at the 
whole group. Although indi- 
viduals may have similari- 
ties, personalities, strengths 
and weaknesses could be dif- 
ferent if you look a little clos- 
er This was my experience as 
a college freshman, who 
joined a concert committee. 

As any college campus, we 
are always filled with stu- 
dents from a variety of cul- 



tures, academic organizations 
and everything from athletes 
to Zionists. There are those 
groups that no one is sure of. 
Recently, I was talking to 
someone, who very simply 
said, "I don't know why I try 
[to] be involved with that 
group. There is no point!..." 
After this person expressed 
their frustration to me — as if 
I was the Wiz in Oz — I was 
trying to figure out: Is this 
person right? 

Are all groups just cliques? 
Why is this something I'm 
worried about? Should this 
even be something I ques- 
tion?! The statement that still 
lingers in my mind from this 
exchange is when they said, 
"Three people want to have 
game night ...it is a waste of 
time and energy to plan some- 
thing that the [students of a 
major] should help plan and 
attend!" 

Curiosities start to enter my 
mind: Is this my reality? Why 
is this student expressing this 
to me? I can't change that. I 
have mid-terms, work, class 
and meetings. I can't help this 
person... can I? I still do not 
have a direct answer to that 
person (or to others) who have 
similar concerns. 

I soon realized no one can 
make up your mind for you. 
You can change your own 
actions. This leads me to won- 
der does anyone "Practice 
what they preach?" 



October 27. 2005 



Tm CLARION CALL 



Page 5 




Ashley Boynes 
Advertising Designer 

s_amboynes@clarion.edu 



Beautiful Babble: 

Metrosexuals Rock! 

Brad Pitt, P. Diddy, George Clooney, Usher... all met- 
rosexuals. As are many pro athletes. "What!!?!?" you 
gasp! The definition of a metrosexual is nothing pho- 
bic, offensive or strange. The term "metrosexual" was 
coined in the mid-90s but upon the rise of the new mil- 
lennium, is a phrase that has caught on rapidly and 
spread just as quickly as wildfire. Let me give you a 

few definitions for those of 
you who are ignorant to 
what it means for a guy to 
be "metro." 

The Web site Wikipedia 
(www.wikipedia.org) says 
this about metrosexual 
males; "Metrosexual was 
coined in 1994 (as was its 
noun, metrosexuality) by 
British journalist Mark 
Simpson, who used it to 
refer to an urban male of 
any sexual orientation 
who has a strong aesthet- 
ic sense and spends a 
great deal of time and 
money on his appearance 
and lifestyle." 
Now, my question to you 
is; what is wrong with this? In my opinion, nothing. 
But for those of you v/ho shun metrosexuality, let me 
ask you what is wrong with a guy who spends money 
on himself, knows how to dress, is cultured, sensitive 
and keeps up his daily hygiene? I love it! I love metro- 
sexuals, and I will shout it to the world! 

For some reason though, metrosexual males seem to 
creep out many of their "macho" counterparts. Often 
times the "macho" male-chauvinist mentality is linked 
with more.. .shall we say, "rural" roots, and this might 
be the problematic area. These men do not have expo- 
sure to the more cultured parts of civilization. What 
modern male still idolizes AI Bundy, thinks extreme 
public intoxication is a hoot, picks his wedgies in pub- 
lic and thinks women belong in the kitchen? Welcome 
to 2005! The Neanderthal thing is so over! Do I LOOK 
like Wilma Flintstone to you? Women want men with 
class! 

Metrosexual males are often "city boys" who have 
access to fine restaurants, theatre, good concerts and 
high-end stores and salons. They usually have jobs 
where appearance is important, and even if not, like to 
look decent. They actually (gasp!) realize that person- 
al hygiene is a must, and might even go as far as to 
care for their skin and hair! 

Caring about these things is not "girly," in any way. 
A guy who knows just enough about fashion and pop 
culture, looks presentable, can hold an intelligent con- 
versation and still knows his football is perfect in my 
book! 

Granted, my man can't be "prettier" than me, and he 
has to know a thing or two about sports. It would be 
nice for my guy to be able to hold his own in a fight, 
but that is not the lone determining factor - a metro- 
sexual typically does not fight because he is mature 
and worldly enough to know that there are other more 
civilized ways to resolve an issue other than a drunk- 
en brawl outside the bar. 

Now many of you may not be totally metro, yet may 
not be totally macho, either; that's okay. It's the cave- 
man mentality that has got to go. So, if you don't burp 
and fart in public, if you have the class NOT to spit in 
public, and you shower occasionally, you are okay in 
my book. You are on your way to becoming a modern 
man. You don't have to go totally "GQ." Just respect 
yourself and the people around you who have to look 
at you and deal with you! 

In conclusion, I'd like to say praise to you, metrosex- 
uals of the world ... and to all of you macho cavemen 
out there, take a lesson from these guys! 



I see a brain tumor in my near future 



Paul Anderson 
Circulation Manager 

s_pmanderson®clarion.edu 

For years, I was (and, still, 
kinda am) proud to say that 
I didn't own a cell phone. 
Such a statement would 
usually garnish a "What? 
You don't have a cell 
phone?" in tones of sympa- 
thy and pity, as if I was 
some terminal kid who had 
recently been denied by the 
Make a Wish Foundation. 
But, I had no real problems 
with being celMess. Ever 
since the cell became the 
modern version of one's car 
keys (as in, you never leave 
the house without it), my 
argument has always been 
that if I'm not home, I don't 
want to talk to you. 

Besides, I always hated 
those people who talked on 
the phone while they drove, 
usually slowing down to 50 
in the passing lane on the 
interstate, or those jerk-offs 
in movie theaters (there's a 
Pee Wee Herman joke some- 
where in there) who would 
leave their phone on and 
then talk throughout the 
entire climax. I often wished 
that people would get on 
with contracting a juicy 
brain tumor from their cell 
phones, thus earning them 
Darwin Awards all that 
much faster. 

So, I led a mostly guilt-free 
existence; to sum up, I didn't 
think being denied by the 



i 



The 




Ground 



ing 



Make a Wish Foundation 
was such a bad thing. My 
friends have always given 
me a hard time about not 
having one, mostly because 
I'm nearly impossible to get 
ahold of. But since I was 
never very conversational 
on the phone (I would rather 
drive 20 miles to talk to 
someone in person than call 
them), anyway, this isn't 
saying much. 

But, like Robert 
Zimmerman once wrote, the 
times — they are a -changing 
(and three cheers for us 
music nerds who just under- 
stood that reference; don't 
break your arm patting 
yourself on the back). 
Currently, even the Amish 
have cell phones to conduct 
business-the Amish. And I 
frequently see kids barely a 
year out of diapers with 
them. I kinda feel like a dig- 
ital version of Rip Van 
Winkle: I fell asleep when 
cell phones were still those 
clunky hunks of plastic that 
looked like half of a football 
helmet and awoke in a time 
when cells are the size of 
matchboxes and everyone 



and their cat has one. 

On top of all that, I'm on 
Block (core classes for us 
Education majors ) and, in a 
few months, I'll be student 
teaching. Now, no one read- 
ing that gives much of a 
damn and might think of 
such a statement as a non 
sequitur, but this is actually 
a big deal. See, I'm on Block 
and student teaching in the 
general area of Clarion, 
which, as we all know, isn't 
the most populated place. In 
a town where music begins 
and ends with noxious coun- 
try (excluding Johnny Cash, 
but I don't count him as very 
country), you know you're a- 
ways away from big-city- 
livin'. 

To wit, on Block I have to 
drive 90 minutes, round 
trip, to get to my placement, 
and student teaching isn't 
looking all that better. I do 
have a new car, but a new 
car isn't going to keep my 
tires from getting punc- 
tured, now, is it? A 2005 
model doesn't mean much 
when you're doing figure- 
eights on the interstate 
because of the ice. And, for 



those of you who have driv- 
en Interstate 80 in the past, 
oh I don't know, ever, you 
know that it's pretty barren 
of modern life. 

So, unless I want to hike 
15 miles to the nearest pay- 
phone or end up as an extra 
in "Deliverance" (I first told 
that joke a week ago and 
one person understood it; by 
publishing the joke, I'm hop- 
ing for two), with some 
creepy guy named Virgil 
telling me that I have a 
pretty mouth, I must have a 
cell phone. Reach out and 
touch someone, y'know? 

So, I'm looking for a decent 
cell plan, and feeling like a 
traitor to all the corpses who 
don't have one (I've come to 
the conclusion that only the 
dead are apathetic about 
having one, for obvious rea- 
sons — think of the reception 
six feet under ground). 

I know now that I'm only a 
few steps away from chat- 
ting throughout the next 
"SpiderMan" movie (howev- 
er, that might actually be a 
good thing). 

And, if it's true that cell 
phones heighten the 
chances of getting a brain 
tumor, then, knowing my 
luck, I'll be able to play ten- 
nis using the malignant 
bunch of cells in my frontal 
lobe within a few years. But, 
you know, it's the price of 
progress, right? 

The soon-to-be-cancerous 
section of my brain just told 
me to shut up. Oh well. 



I don't like you and I don't care what you think 




Jason Bice 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjabice@clarlon.edu 

Has anyone ever told you 
that they don't care what 
other people think of them? 
If so, those people are liars. 
Not just any kinds of liars 
either, dirty liars. Why are 
they liars? I'll tell you why. 
Everybody cares about 
how other people perceive 
them. They may not care 
what every single person in 
the world thinks about 
them, but they do care what 
the people around them 



think. That's why we see 
popped collars, trucker hats 
and stupid purses that look 
like somebody killed a mer- 
maid. 

I'm not exempt from this 
either I care a lot about 
what people think of me. 
That's why I wear pink 
shirts and shop at such 
fashionable places as 
American Eagle and 
Aeropostale. I especially 
enjoy how the workers in 
these stores all have head- 
sets so they can talk to each 
other from across the room. 
Is this really necessary? I 
mean, the store isn't that 
big. What the hell do they 
even have to say to each 
other? 

"Hey Brent, watch out for 
the guy in the red shirt. I 
think he got that belt from 
K-Mart." 

"Will do, Clint, do you 
maybe want to go see 
'Elizabethtown' later?" 



"Sorry, I'm having a rasp- 
berry smoothie party at my 
place. Be there or be 
square!" 

I'd imagine this is pretty 
much how every conversa- 
tion goes at these places, 
though I could be wrong. 

But let's get back to my 
point (as if I really even 
have one). I'd like for every- 
one to say, "Hey, that Jason 
Bice sure is swell, and he is 
so smooth with the ladies!" 
but that's not always the 
case. Not everyone thinks 
I'm swell, and girls think 
I'm creepy. I'm also horrible 
with first impressions 
because I try to say things 
that I think people will 
laugh at, but instead they 
think I'm a jerk. I'm not 
even really sure why I do 
this. You'd think I'd learn 
my lesson, but apparently 
not. Perhaps I should take a 
different approach. Maybe I 
could introduce myself with 



a dance. I do have some of 
the best moves in town. The 
only problem with that 
would be that someone 
might think I'm trying to 
challenge them. Then I risk 
getting served, but if you 
have any better ideas let me 
know. 

Let's face it. There's not 
one person in the world who 
everyone likes, well, other 
than Tony Danza, and 
rumor has it that some peo- 
ple don't even like him! 
There's always going to be 
at least one person who 
doesn't like you for one rea- 
son or another. Maybe it's 
because you're fat, maybe 
it's because you're a nerd or 
maybe it's because you're 
Ryan Seacrest; it could be 
for pretty much anything. I 
guess the only thing you can 
do is pop your collar and 
hope for the best. That's 
what I'm going to do. 
Seacrest out! 




Steph.anie Corso 

Senior, Elementary education 

'Like You' by Ciara and Bow Wow and 
'Breakaway' by Kelly Clarkson." 




Sara Hoover 
and Jenna Angelos 



"What is your 
favorite song?" 




Manny Jones 
Sophomore, Speech Communication 

" 'Diamonds' by Kanye West." 



Mike Bancroft 

Junior, Secondary Math Education 

" 'Time' by Pink Floyd." 





Elijah "Olschool" Everett 

Junior, Communication 

" 'Umi Says' by Mos Def." 




Sheena Anthony 

Freshman, Undecided 

'Photograph' by Nickelback." 



Jessica Garrison 

Freshman, Business 

"'What I Got' by Sublime." 




MiAll 




Pages 



Tm CUkMON CALL 



October 27. 2005 




Strattenville 

Haunted Hall 

good for scare 



Grant Herrnberger 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



The weather last Friday 
night made a perfect set- 
ting for a horror movie. 
The wind was howling 
and it was cold and rain- 
ing. With the weather 
being so gloomy and it 
being this close to 
Halloween, there seemed 
to be only one thing to 
do... visit a haunted 
house. 

The Strattenville Fire 
Hall is holding its annual 
Haunted Hall for the gen- 
eral public. 

Each group had to go 
through the haunted hall 
in pairs of two. That kind 
of gave you an awkward 
feeling. I don't know 
about some people, but 
strength in numbers 
seems just fine to me. 
Feeling brave, my date 
and I volunteered to go 
through first. 

The anticipation started 
to grow when it was 
about time to enter. A 
layer of fog and flashing 
lights made for an inter- 
esting start. As you walk 
through the fog your eyes 
are trying to adjust to the 
darkness. A small room 
with very poor lighting 
contained a figure sitting 
in a chair. That figure 
turned out to be a blood 
drenched, murdered 
woman. As you pass by 
her, it becomes clear that 
she may not be dead yet 
'as she starts to rock back 
and forth in her chair. 

As you exit this room 
and turn the comer you 
are greeted by a masked 
figure. You walk a little 
further and the forra of a 
person starts to become 
visual in front of you. The 
white dress and pale face 
of a woman walking 
towards you offered a 
reminder of the girl from 
the movie '"The Ring." It 
was impressive how hor- 
rifying tliis lady looked as 
she stumbled down the 
hall The lady in the 
white dress just walked 
by without saying any- 
thing. 

The hall we were in at 
the time was fairly long 
and barely Ut. You had to 
walk slowly because you 
couldn't see three inches 
in front of your face- 
Something made me tiurn 
around and to my sur- 
prise the lady in the 
white dress was following 
one step behind us. I'm 
not afraid to admit that I 
jumped about a foot off 
the ground. 

Another room depicted a 
cemetery scene. There 
was a coffin to our right. 
The only reason we saw it 
was because a nasty look- 
ing creature jumpedout 
screaming and growling. 

Sharon Rawson, taking 
money at the door, said, 
"We make sure that our 
ghouls tame it down for 
young kids when they 
come through but you col- 
lege kids we like to scare 
you as much as we can." 

A lot of hard work was 
done. Everything from 
the make-up to the props 
was impressive. 

The Haunted Hall will 
be open Friday and 
Saturday from 7 p.m. to 
11 -p.m. The fire hall is 
located 5 miles outside of 
Clarion. 



enfure^ 



f^ 



/- 



fj^ '**' 




jt 



Clarion students celebrate Halloween 



Jeff Donston 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

Trick or Treat! As a kid 
those two words meant only 
one thing.. .candy! As a kid, 
every Halloween you put on 
your costume, painted your 
face and grabbed your bag 
or plastic pumpkin and 
went house to house taking 
candy from strangers, which 
was the only time that was 
acceptable. But as you got 
older, "trick or treating" and 
Halloween in general 
became less cool. Instead of 
wearing a costume, you just 
wore dark clothes, and, 
instead of carrying a bag full 
of candy, you carried a car- 
ton of eggs. Now that we are 
adults we don't celebrate 
Halloween the same way. 
There are no more bags full 
of candy and no more empty 
egg cartons, for most people. 

According to the History 
Channel website (www. his- 
torychannel.com). 



Halloween's origins date 
back to the Celtic festival 
called Samhain in Ireland 
2.000 years ago. The Celts 
celebrated their New Year 
on Nov. 1. This day marked 
the end of summer and the 
harvest. On the day before 
(Oct. 31), the Celts celebrat- 
ed Samhain. They believed 
that on this day, the 
boundary between the 
worlds of the living and 
the dead blurred and the 
ghosts of the dead 
returned to Earth. During 
the celebration the Celts 
wore costumes and told for 
tunes. 

As Christianity spread to 
Ireland the Catholic church 
designated Nov. 1 as All 
Saints Day to commemorate 
saints and martyrs in hopes 
to replace the Celtic festival 
of the dead. This celebration 
was also known as All-hol- 
lows and All-hollowmas. 
The day before it, began to 
be called All-hollows Eve 
and eventually it became 
Halloween. 



So that brings us back to 
present day, where All-hol- 
lows Eve is still being cele- 
brated, but mostly now only 
known as Halloween. Of 
it has 




restructured and 
commercialized, but some of 
its origins are still there. 

At Clarion University 
many students still cele- 
brate Halloween, not in the 
same way they did as kids, 
but nonetheless they still 
celebrate it. Dave Shipman, 
a 22-year-old junior sociolo- 
gy major said he celebrates 
Halloween by going to 
Halloween parties. Shipman 



said he is too old to trick or 
treat and stopped going 
before he reached junior 
high school. He said he feels 
Halloween is more of a chil- 
dren's holiday. But he also 
said Halloween, "is a good 
reason to party." Shipman 
said his most memorable 
Halloween was when he 
was 16. He said he, 
"partied all night until 
like 6:30 in the morn- 
ing and broke a few 
laws." 
Other Clarion Students 
don't feel Halloween is 
strictly for kids though. 
Matt Oknefski. a 20-year- 
old secondary education 
major, said he is "absolutely 
not" too old to celebrate 
Halloween. 

Oknefski said he trick or 
treated until he was 17. 

"It's fun to take a day from 
real life; Halloween offers a 
chance to do that," he said. 
Okenfski said his most 
memorable Halloween is 
when he was about 7 years 
old and he split his chin on a 



wooden barrel flower pot 
while trick or treating. 

Mike Williams, a 19 year 
old freshman education 
major said he feels too old to 
celebrate Halloween by trick 
or treating. He said it is, 
"because when you think of 
Halloween, you think of 
scary things and going to 
houses and getting candy 
and most adults are grown 
out of stuff like that." Now 
WiUiams said he just cele- 
brates Halloween by going 
to Halloween parties. 
Williams said his most 
memorable Halloween was 
when he was in the sixth 
grade and two older kids 
were messing with his 
friend and him, so they took 
their candy. 

Still, even though there 
are people who feel you're 
never too old to trick or 
treat, most adults who cele- 
brate Halloween, if they cel- 
ebrate it at all, do it by dec- 
orating their house, handing 
out candy, or attending a 
Halloween party for adults. 





Grant H«rmb«rg«r/T7M Ctorfon Catf 

HALLOWEEN - This creature appeared at the 
Stratter)ville Haunted HalL 



Haunted House held in Gemmell 



Kurt Boyd The air outside has started to get a lit- 

C/ar/on Ca// Staff Writer tie colder over the last few weeks, 
^-----------— -------------- leaves are falling off the trees and 

Thanksgiving break is just around the corner. This can only mean 
one thing, the ghoullng season, Halloween, is upon us. 

On Wednesday Oct. 26 in the Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room, 
Sam Losagio Entertainment put on a free haunted house for the 
students and surrounding community. The event which lasted 
from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., offered everything from skeletons to a 
Lizard Boy greeting** patrons at the entrance with severed 
limbs to play twister for prizes. With over 25 years of expe- 
rience, Sam Losagio Entertainment has entertained every- 
thing from weddings, to children's shows. They are 
based out of Bethlehem, Pa., and are licensed to enter- 
tain in Eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey and 
Delaware. 

"A fun and entertaining Halloween experience," is 
how union chair for the University Activities Board 
Din Divety described his expectations for 
Wednesday night's event. With over 30 student 
vplunteers working In costume, it might make 
i one wonder why a student would take time out 

I of his or her busy schedule to become involved 

with something like this. 

Krystle Bieber, a sophomore rehabilitative 
science major, describes her reason for vol- 
unteering as "something different on cam- 
pus that I didn't have to travel to." 
Along with her Sigma Sigma Sigma soror- 
J ity sister Megan Perucci, a sophomore 

communciation science and disorders 
■'- major, Bieber helped to escort patrons 

into the haunted maze, demonically 
speaking, wearing nothing more than a 
black robe, and black mask. Perucci and 
Bieber found out about how to volun- 
teer through their sorority. 

Perucci responded that her main 
point of volunteering was "To have fun 
and try to scare someone." 

Laura Dittman, a sophomore nurs- 
ing major, and her boyfriend Brendan 
Litzinger, a sophomore CIS major, 
found out about the event on the 
events calendar on the first floor of 
Wilkinson Hall. Their expectations 
on a scale of one to 10 going into 
the maze were a two from 
Litzinger, and a six from Dittman. 
After going through the 10 to 15 
minute chamber of terror, they 
came back out with all of their 
limbs still in tact to give the final 
verdict. 
I This is the first time that 

anything like this has been put 
on at Clarion University, and it 
is just one of many things the 
union chair has in store for 
the remainder of the fall 
2(M)5 semester. 



October 27, 2005 



Hffi CLARION CALL 



Page 7 






Spotlight On: The Calm Before 

Five-member group plays throughout state 



p- 



Ashley Boynes 
Advertising Designer 

The Calm Before, who 
played in Clarion's 
Reinhard Villages on 
Sunday Oct. 23, is a local 
band that started with just 
a flyer, a phone call and tour 
guys. The band writes and 
performs original music. 

Consisting of five young 
men - John Airhart, Joel 
Masters, Jesse Wolbert, 
Joey Wolbert and Mick 
Wachob, their captivating 
pop punk sound has a fan 
base consisting of kinder- 
gartners to college students 
to grandparents and every- 
one in between! 

They formed in the spring 
of 2004 and have since been 
playing throughout 

Pennsylvania, despite a 
brief breakup during a rocky 
time when band members 
were unsure of their individ- 
ual directions. They came 
back together, though. This 
remarkable band features 
Airhart as the lead vocalist, 
with Jesse Wolbert on lead 
guitar, Joey Wolbert and 
Masters accompany on bass 
guitar and rhythm guitar, 
respectively and Wachob on 
drums completes the band. 




Photo Illustration: Shasta Kurt^The Clarion Call 
THE CALM BEFORE - The Calm Before, a five member group, pre- 
formed at Reinhard Villages on Oct. 23. 



Though mostly popular in 
the Clarion area and sur- 
rounding places, such as 
their hometowns of Lucinda. 
New Bethlehem and 
Tionesta, they are not 
restricted to doing local 
shows. In fact, the Calm 
Before is far from strictly 
"local." They have played in 
Virginia, Ohio, New Jersey 
and Indiana, as well. One of 
their main goals is to "play 
music every day in a differ- 
ent town or city." In the year 
and one month that they 
have been playing, the Calm 
Before has surely accom- 
plished a lot. 

They are with Subverse 



Records, and have a debut 
album out entitled "The 
Password is EP." The group 
was promoted by Subverse 
Records at the Vans Warped 
Tour at the Pittsburgh Post 
Gazette Pavilion venue this 
past August. Songs on their 
debut EP include the follow- 
ing: "Doc Awesome", "This 
One's For Keeps", "In the 
Making," "Selling Dynamite 
to Kids," "Jeffrey Dahmer 
Eat Your Heart Out" and 
"Summer Song." They list 
their musical influences as 
"anyone who has played 
music before them" but cite 
Weezer, Green Day, No Use 
for a Name, The Cars, 



Sublime, Brand New, Jimi 
Hendrix, Saves the Day, The 
Foo Fighters, Strung Out, 
Third Eye Blind, and "many 
many more" as specific 
influences on their MySpace 
website. 

You can listen to, and learn 
more about, the Calm 
Before by visiting one of the 
following sites: 

www.myspace.com/calmbe- 
fore, 
www.purevolume.com/the- 
calmbefore, or www.the- 
calmbeforerock.com. You 
can buy their album at 
www.interpunk.com by 
entering "Calm Before" in 
the search field. 

They often do shows in the 
Clarion area. Upcoming 
shows include: the Surf N' 
Skate Halloween Show in 
DuBois, Pa. at 6 p.m. on 
Oct. 30; a show at the Solid 
Rock Cafe in Seneca. Pa. on 
Nov. 11 and a Nov. 19 show 
at Crawford Center in 
Emlenton, Pa. They hope to 
do a show at Clarion 
University at some point, 
too. 

There you have it, "A sim- 
ple story of the life, death, 
and rebirth of a Western Pa. 
pop punk band. Rock on, 
kiddo's!" ■ The Calm Before. 



Greek life continues after college graduation 




Josh Pierce 
and Amanda Goe 



Being a Greek is common- 
ly thought to only be impor- 
tant when one is in college 
and that Uke most college 
activities, it will conclude at 
graduation. Though being 
a Greek after college seems 
to be a novelty of an idea, 
Greeks have an obligation 
to their brothers or sisters 
and to the creed in which 
they've pledged their life. 
Greeks have the obligation 
of becoming an alumnus 
after graduation; which 



comes with many responsi- 
bilities. Alumni are asked 
to give their time and effort 
in the attempt to continual- 
ly help maintain their chap- 
ter and possibly even their 
Greek community. Alumni 
are commonly placed on 
alumni advisor boards in 
which they aid in making 
decisions, along with the 
active members, to best 
represent and operate their 
Greek organization. Even 
the Greek community as a 
whole may have an alumni 
advisor help them; for 
example Shawn Hoke. 
Hoke is the Greek advisor 
for Clarion University and 
his job is to help the active 
members of the Greek com- 
munity in all of their activi- 
ties. Hoke is a Kappa Delta 
Rho alumni as well as the 
fraternities' national presi- 
dent. Commonly Greek 



alumni give money as a 
donation to their chapter as 
a sign of gratitude for the 
chapter's efforts to better 
themselves not only at a 
collegiate level, but at a 
national level as well. 
Alumni play a critical role 
in a chapter's ability to 
grow and maintain the 
standards set forth by the 
founders as well ts the ufti- 
versity. feeing an active 
alumnus is just as, if not 
more, important as being 
an active member. 

SPOTLIGHT: 
DELTA ZETA 

The Epsilon Theta Chapter 
of Delta Zeta at Clarion 
University celebrated their 
official founder's day over 
the past weekend. Delta 
Zeta was founded national- 
ly on Oct. 24, 1902 at Miami 
University iriOxfQrd, Ohio. 



The sisters held their annu- 
al founder's day dinner last 
Thursday at the Holiday 
Inn, which included a for- 
mal sit down meal and cer- 
emony honoring their six 
founders. The sisters also 
held a sisterhood activity 
Jast Saturday night also 
honoring their six founders 
with the help of three alum- 
ai. The Delta Zeta chapter 
was formed in May of 1930 
at Clarion University. 
Delta Zeta is the second 
largest National Sorority. 
Delta Zeta's philanthropy is 
Speech and Hearing Help, 
and their colors are rose 
and green. The Jewel of 
Delta Zeta is the diamond, 
and its mascot is a turtle. 
Congratulations to the sis- 
ters of Delta Zeta on their 
103rd anniversary as a 
national social sorority. 



ASK wcron moiC'E 



Dear Dr Eagle, 

The other day I heard some people talking about the 
'morning after pill.' I have never heard about it before. 
Could you pive me some information about this pill and 
how it works? 
Signed, 

Curious 

Dear Curious, 

The pill that you heard 
about it called plan B. It is an 
emergency contraception 
that is taken within 72 hours 
after a contraceptive acci- 
dent or unprotected sex. The 
pill is used to prevent a preg- 
nancy by stopping ovulation, 
fertilization and/or implanta- 
tion. 

People often call plan B the 
'morning after pill,' but this 
is not true. Two pills are 
taken not one. They are 
taken within 12 hours of 
each another. The first one 
should be taken within 72 
hours after the incident. The 
second pill is taken 12 hours 
later. The effectiveness 
declines as the time interval increases. If plan B is used 
within 24 hours it is 95 percent accurate in preventing 
pregnancy. If it is taken within 72 hours it is 89 percent 
accurate. 

Plan B is emergency contraception. It should not be 
used as a form of birth control. Plan B is less effective 
than regular contraception and does not protect against 
HIV/AIDS or sexual transmitted infections. Make sure 
you always use other forms of birth control and use this 
only in an emergency. Also, plan B will not work if you 
are already pregnant. This pill is designed to prevent 
pregnancy, not terminate it. 

You can get plan B at Family Health Council or on cam- 
pus at the KeeUng Health Center, 

Doctor Eagle is written by Sarah Wilson of the Keeling 
Health Center. For more information or to suggest a 
topic please contact her at 8_smwil8on@clarion.edu 




F 



Famity Health 
Council, Inc. 



1064 A. East iVlain Street 

814-226-7500 
\v\v^. fhcinc.org 



Providing birth control, enrergency 

eontraception and gyn€ services. 

Free STD testing & treatment. 



Most insurance plans accepted. 

Sliding scale fees lor those without insurance. 

.All ser% ices are confidential. 



Amber White 

Assistant Features Editor 



Is it more difficult to 
choose a path before college 
or after? Many students 
come to college having no 
idea what they want to do 
with the rest of their lives, 
and some probably gradu- 
ate with the same confu- 
sion. Others know exactly 
what they want to do by the 
time they've graduated high 
school, but by the end of col- 
lege are struck with indeci- 
sions. Perhaps, surprisingly 
to some, Cody Ressel falls 
into the latter category. 
Don't let that be mislead- 
ing, however; he's certainly 
made the most of his time 
at Clarion University. 

His activities on campus 
have included the Honors 
Program, Arete, Phi Eta 
Sigma, the Eagle 

Ambassadors and being an 
RA for Wilkinson Hall. 
Currently, he is serving as 
vice-president of student 
senate, and he was also 
nominated by the Eagle 
Ambassadors for the 2005 
Homecoming court. He was 
equally active in high 
school, taking part in band 
and orchestra, the National 
Honor Society and serving 
as president of Interact, 
"which is like Circle-K, but 
Rotary sponsors it instead 
of Kiwanis." 
What he would major in at 



college was something he'd 
decided long before gradu- 
ating from high school. 

"I would say that I felt like 
I knew that I wanted to be a 
teacher in upper elemen- 
tary school," he said. 

Once in high school, he 
applied to two of the eight 
Governor's Schools in 
Pennsylvania, one of which 
was focused on teaching. "I 
didn't get into International 
Studies," he said, "but that 
year they set up a new one 
at Lehigh University for 
Global Entrepreneurship." 
He spent five weeks with 
about 49 other students, ten 
of whom were from other 
countries. 

His decision to join stu- 
dent senate came about 
through his participation in 
Arete (now known as the 
Student Honors 

Association). Whenever the 
group needed to ask for 
money, Ressel was always 
the one chosen to ask for it. 
"You don't seem to get any- 
where unless you under- 
stand the system," and so 
he became involved with 
the organization. 

"I'm the type of person 
that cannot sit still," he 
said, when asked why he 
joined so many different 
activities. "I always need to 
be busy, and I'm the type of 
person that always needs a 
challenge." 

He appreciates all the 
experience he's gotten from 



these organizations too, 
saying that they've "opened 
so many different doors." 
The opportunity for net- 
working is also important. 
Being a member of the 
Eagle Ambassadors gave 
him the opportunity to meet 
the speaker for this year's 
Social Equity dinner, a 
woman who graduated from 
Clarion in 1955 with a 
library science degree. She 
was also the first African 
American woman to live on 
campus and graduate. 

One other thing that these 
organizations have given 
him is the ability to stay 
calm when things become 
hectic. A person might think 
that all these activities, on 
top of a large course load, 
would be too much for any 
college student to handle. It 
was being an RA that made 
Ressel realize that stressing 
out just wasn't worth it. 

"It's nice when you finally 
reach that point because... if 
you have something that 
you need to do, it's going to 
get done no matter what 
time of day it gets done." 

A big goal that he would 
like to accomplish is to raise 
the $10,000 for the Katrina 
Hurricane Relief effort. On 
a local level, he would like 
to see students get more 
involved with the university 
and the community at 
large. 

"Our advisors brought up 
the point that we make up 




50 percent of this town 
when we're here," he said, 
"and we're here for nine 
months out of the year, but 
yet we have absolutely no 
representation on the 
Borough Council." 

Besides extra-curricular 
activities, the university 
has also given Ressel the 
opportunity to travel, both 
domestically and interna- 
tionally. Just this summer 
he and Katie Zygowski were 
picked as Clarion's repre- 
sentatives to travel to Paris, 
France. He also traveled to 
Egypt as part of 



an 



exchange program. Within 
the United States, he's been 
to Chicago, New Orleans, 
Philadelphia, Boston and 
St. Louis. 

"I think traveling abroad 
is a necessity for everyone," 
he said. "It just opens your 
eyes to so many things that 
you're not going to learn 
about in a textbook." 

So why Clarion? While 
most young adults pick a 
college that's within an 
hour or so from their home, 
Ressel chose one that 
included a drive of over four 
hours. 



"You've just gotta get out 
of the bubble," he said. 

Any place a person grows 
up in has its own culture 
and mentality, and for 
Ressel it's about exploring 
and venturing outside of 
that bubble. He doesn't 
know if he'll go back home 
to find work, or even what 
exactly he wants to do with 
the rest of his life. Running 
for a political office at some 
point in the future, he said, 
sounds like an interesting 
idea. 



Page 8 



THE CLARION CALL 



October 27, 2005 



SiMiineit 





Emo: 

new grunge? 



Steve Trichtinger 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



Qood &, RandoiH 

I realized something the other day when looking at 
my massive CD collection... What happened to grunge? 
You know grunge, that music that dominated the '90s. 
Flannels and ripped jeans, long greasy hair, it s all 
become obsolete. Grunge has disappeared off the map. 
I have concluded that emo is now the new grunge. 

Remember Nirvana? That band everyone liked that 
changed the face of the rock; yeah they aren't here any- 
more: Pearl Jam hasn't 
put out a good record 
since "Vitology," and Alice 
n' Chains is gone, too. So 
where did the grunge go? 
It changed from dark, 
depressing mumbles into 
a little less dark, depress- 
ing screams and whines. 

What happened to 
Seattle, you know the 
place pretty much every 
grunge band popped out 
of? It became Middle 
America, little nowhere 
towns that bands pop out 
of and become huge. 
Grunge spawned Kurt 

Cobain, the idol of the 

early nineties. Now everyone doesn't necessarily want 
to be a single person in emo, but an image. Red make- 
up under the eyes, sometimes only eyehner, tight jeans, 
strange t-shirts and comi- 
cal attitudes; it's pretty " «------—----------------—-- 

routine. 

Why do people feel the 
need to rip on people's 
tastes, you know like mak- 
ing fun of the person who 
wears all black, or the kid 
who sags his pants. I don't 
know about anyone else, 
but was past that in like 

eighth grade. Some of the coolest people I know dress 
entirely different than me and listen to different music. 
We need to stop bunching people into categories based 
on what you like in music. 

It's like another form of racism, let's call it musicism. 
People make fun of the emo kids cause they wear tight 
clothes and sometimes makeup! so the hell what? All 
the people on TV, yeah, they wear makeup, too. People 
think chain wallets or sagging pants and big t-shirts is 
a sign of a hoodlum. STOP IT. 

Note to emo" you won't stick around much longer. If 
we look to the past, we see what happened to grunge; 
it's long gone. When any style of music is over exposed 
it will soon become history. There is always going to be 
the main genres of music, but the little sub sects come 
and go. 

As grunge died out, alternative took over, but now 
emo has the reigns. As gangsta rap died out and was 
replaced by dirty south hip hop, which was replaced by 
crunk. I think you see where I am going with this. Emo 
will continue to be the new grunge until something else 
comes along that sounds decent and has the image to 
market. 

Don't make music another thing to separate us, we 
have enough of that already. If music is good listen, 
don't be that guy who cuts on the kid who hkes goth 
and wears black, get over it. 

Emo and scene kids, hang your heads in despair 
because I think emo might start to fall out here in the 
next few years. Hey, you never know grunge could come 
back for another run. I might have to bust out the flan- 
nels. 



Note to emo: you 
won't stick around 
much longer. 



»» 




Melissa Holller/TTie Clarion Call 
ROQER OXENDALE - Roger Oxendale, president and CEO of 
Children's Hospital, spoke on Oct. 21 at 10 a.m. in 250-252 
Gemmell about his career. 



New Thrice born with 'Vheissu' 




Jon Gofer 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

"Vheissu" 
Artist: Thrice 



rating: 5/5 



il|lF!$n$r##r 



When Thrice's third 
album, "The Artist in the 
Ambulance" dropped in 
2003, they were atop their 
alternative punk-rock game. 
They had already released a 
powerful and raw first CD, 
"Identity Crisis," and a mas- 
terpiece sophomore album 
in "The Illusion of Safety" 
"Ambulance" drew from 
their first two albums, but 
with the production of their 
first major label release. It 
was heavy, fast and full of 
great lyrics. Fans of the first 
three CDs had a lot to 
expect out of Thrice's new 
disc, "Vheissu," which was 
released on Oct. 18. 

For the part of Thrice's fan 
base that only enjoyed their 
fast-paced punk influences - 
this CD may be a bit of a let- 
down. Those who admire a 
band who evolves and does- 
n't make "clone" CDs will 



find "Vheissu" a breath of 
fresh air, full of creativity. 

The biggest difference 
between Thrice's older 
releases and "Vheissu" is it 
is much more mellow. 

Songs like "Atlantic" and 
"Red Sky" are eerie and 
slow. Most of the songs on 
the CD consist of some slow 
parts but are also heavy in 
other parts. Songs like 
"Between The End And 
Where We Lie" and "Music 
Box" start slow and become 
heavy, then return to a soft- 
er feel. This makes the 
album more dynamic than 
their previous releases. 



(t 



The biggest difference 
between Thrice's older 
releases and 'Vheissu' 
is it is much more 
mellow. 



a 



Another new incorporation 
into their songs is synthesiz- 
er and piano, which impacts 
the entire album in an inter- 
esting way. 

This is not to say Thrice 
has lost their edge. Songs 
like "Image of The 
Invisible," "The Earth Will 
Shake" and "Hold Fast 
Hope" certainly rock most of 
the way through. And 
Dustin Kensrue's powerful 



screams find home in not 
only these songs, but sever- 
al others as well, like the 
end of "For Miles" and "Like 
Moths to Flame." 

Thrice seems to have put 
aside the fast, punk-influ- 
enced songs of their past, 
and instead powerful heavy 
guitars and melodies take 
over. 

Themes or feelings seem to 
conquer the music, and the 
atmospheres work real well 
with the lyrics. 

Thrice has a secret weapon 
- amazing lyrics, and those 
in "Vheissu" are as good or 
better than their previous 
albums. Singer Kensrue 
draws on influences such as 
C.S. Lewis' poetry (as they 
have done in albums past) 
as well as other book and 
biblical references. The CD's 
name itself, "Vheissu," is a 
reference to the Thomas 
Pynchon novel "V." 

"Between The End And 
Where We Lie" is influenced 
on a poem by Lewis, and is 
about light and darkness - a 
theme the album carries in 
a few other songs. "The 
Earth Will Shake" is based 
on old prison chants. It goes 
from a bluesy beginning, to 
real heavy, to the whole 
band stomping their feet 
and chanting "We dream of 
ways to break these iron 
bars." 

"For Miles" speaks of there 
being no greater love than 
one who sheds his blood for 



his friends, and is most like- 
ly a biblical reference. "Like 
Moths to Flame" is definite- 
ly influenced by the story of 
St. Peter betraying Jesus. 
Some lyrics that give away 
the meaning include, "From 
my lips lies like poison spill, 
and then that awful sound, 
the sound of prophecy ful- 
filled." 



C( 



This is not to say 
Thrice has lost their 
edge. 



n 



Another great song is "Of 
Dust and Nations" which 
has an awesome upbeat rock 
feel, the central theme say- 
ing sand will cover the pow- 
erful. "So put your faith in 
more than steel," the chorus 
sings. 

"Vheissu" is a change for 
Thrice, but it's admirable 
that they took a different 
approach when they could 
have stuck to the same style 
they had already mastered. 
If you don't like bands 
changing and think they 
should never experiment - 
stick with their "Illusion of 
Safety" or "The Artist in the 
Ambulance." If not, definite- 
ly look into Thrice's new disc 
"Vheissu," for a nice mix of 
heavy songs, eerily mellow 
songs and beautiful lyrics. 



Boys Night Out presents concept 




Elisa Borger 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

'Trainwrecl(" 

Artist: Boys Night Out 



rating:4/5 



i$n|ln$r!|r 



"Trainwreck" is the sopho- 
more album from Boys 
Night Out, a six piece band 
from Burlington, Ontario. 
"Make Yourself Sick," 
released in 2003, was their 
first album. 

Connor Covat-Fraser on 



vocals, Jeff Davis on gui- 
tar/vocals, Shawn Butchart 
on guitar, Dave Costa on 
bass, vocals, Brian Southall 
on drums and Kara Dupley 
on synthesizer/vocals make 
up Boys Night Out. 

"Trainwreck" is a concept 
album, telling a story with 
the track titles on the 
album. 

"Introducing," the first 
track, is a doctor talking 
about the medical record of 
the person this entire album 
is about. Towards the end of 
the track, the band joins in, 
giving the track and eerie 
sound. 

The second track, 
"Dreaming," picks up and 
kicks off the album, setting 
the storyline for the follow- 
ing 10 songs. At points 
throughout the song, you 
can hear the doctor's voice, 
connecting this song to the 
first song. 



"Waking" is the next song, 
my favorite on the album. 
The lyrics, "Make this a 
dream because I really can't 
believe that she's gone," 
makes you think that the 
song is about losing some- 
one who seems to be very 
close with the person this 
album is about. 



(( 



'Trainwreck' is a 
concept album, telling 
a story with the track 
titles on the album. 



ii 



"Sentencing" is the follow- 
ing song, which seems to be 
about this man turning him- 
self in, proclaiming, 
"Nothing makes sense any- 
more, so sick and guilty men 



will be born again with con- 
sciences." 

"Medicating" picks up and 
is about being on medication 
and that being his only 
hope. In his mind he's say- 
ing, "Doctor, doctor what am 
I here for? Can't you see 
that 1 don't need this place?" 

The story continues with 
the track, "Purging" and 
onto "Relapsing." During 
"Relapsing," you get a 
chance to hear Kara Dupley 
on vocals. "Recovering," 
"Composing," 
"Disintegrating" and 

"Healing" are the following 
tracks, which lead to the 
final song on the album, 
"Dying" which has some 
singing and speaking parts. 
All in all, "Trainwreck" 
was a success and artistic 
sophomore album by Boys 
Night Out. 

Boys Night Out is current- 
ly touring with Fall Out Boy. 



A booli fit oniy for a 'Historian' 




Tom IVIcMeekin 
Editor-in-Ciiief 



"The Historian- 
Author: Elizabeth Kostova 

rating:3.5/5 ^li^^ti 

If the author of "The 
Historian" wanted to emu- 
late slow- moving and untidy 
historical research in her 
debut novel, she has suc- 
ceeded. 

This is not to say that his- 



tory, or this novel, is boring. 
However, Elizabeth 

Kostova's novel "The 
Historian" does last 656 
pages and still manages not 
to answer all the reader's 
questions. It also wouldn't 
truly be called an adventure 
or horror story. 

The unnamed narrator is a 
young girl who shares a pas- 
sion for European history 
with her father, an 
American-born diplomat 
who lives in the 
Netherlands and travels 
throughout the continent. 
When she finds a mysteri- 
ous book in his library, he 
slowly and painfully tells 
her the story of his earlier 
life and his research on the 
real Dracula. 

Dracula, or Vlad Tepes, 
was a prince infamous for 



his cruel methods of retain- 
ing power during a time 
when Christian Europe was 
at war with the Ottoman 
Empire. 

Throughout the novel, 
much information is relayed 
about this real background 
of Europe, especially the 
political turmoil and ten- 
sions of the time, which con- 
tinued into the last century 
with the advent of the Cold 
War; communism and the 
USSR taking over areas 
conquered by other groups 
such as the Turks before 
them. 

Most of the story is told in 
flashbacks, letters and 
research notes; some narrat- 
ed by the main protagonist's 
father and some narrated by 
the father's college thesis 
adviser. 



This multi- generational 
aspect, with decades pass- 
ing between various events, 
adds an interesting if some- 
what confusing angle to the 
tales. 

This bestseller would prob- 
ably only interest readers 
with a true interest in this 



(( 



This is not to say that 
history, or this novel, 
is boring. 



n 



kind ofhistory. WHiile it is 
scary or page-turning at 
times, mostly it is just long, 
like the period of time it por- 
trays. 



October 27, 2005 



THE CLARION CALL 



Pagel 



Less originaiity in Hoiiywood = 
More movies about video games 




Nathan Stahlman 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

"DOOM" 

Director: Andrzej Bartkowial< 
Universal Studios 
rating:3.5/5 liflik^l|||li 

If you are one of the mil- 
lions of video game nerds 
that have played "DOOM," 
you already know what this 
film is about. If you have 
never played the game, 
here's the plot. 

Archaeologists, while on a 
dig, find a portal deep 
underground. This portal 
happens to transport what- 
ever goes through it to 
Mars. The curious archaeol- 
ogists decide they should go 
through the portal and do 
more archaeologist stuff on 
Mars to find out why the 
portal is there. This archae- 
ological expedition eventu- 
ally becomes a cover for 
some crazy genetic experi- 
mentation when they find 
out the humanoid people 
who built the portal on mars 
had an extra set of chromo- 
somes, making them super- 
human. 

Obviously if this makes 
them superhuman it would 
work for us right? Or is 
there more to it than a cou- 



ple chromosomes? At any 
rate, something went terri- 
bly wrong with these exper- 
iments, and now there are 
crazy, bloodthirsty monsters 
kiUing people. What do you 
do when monsters are 
killing people? Call in the 
marines of course, more 
specifically a crew of 
marines called the Rapid 
Response Tactical Strike 
force (RRTS) led by The 
Rock, who continues to 
amaze me with every movie 
he makes. 

The Rock has so much 
charisma and on-screen 
presence, I can't imagine 
this movie without him in it. 
By the way, word on the 
street is, he's going to be in 
another video game turned 




lmage.net/Kelth Hamshere 
DOOM - Al Weaver as Kid, Raz Adoti as Duke, Deobia Oparei as 
Destroyer, Richard Brake as Portman, The Rock as Sarge, Karl 
Urban as Reaper, Yao Chin as Mac and Ben Daniels as Goat in 
the science fiction action adventure Doom, based on the explo- 
sive computer game sensation. 



« 



If I were to rate this 
movie on the last half 
hour alone, I would 
call it amazing. 



n 



movie; "Spy Hunter" should 
be out sometime next year. 

The Rock's second in com- 
mand, John Grimm 
"Reaper" (Karl Urban), adds 
some humanity to the mix, 
which counters the cold, sol- 
dier mentality of "Sarge" 
(The Rock). 

Reaper's sister, Samantha 
(Rosamund Pike), rounds off 
the lead three as an archae- 
ologist working on Mars. 

Now, as far as video game 



movies go, this one is pretty 
good. The first hour or so 
seemed to move a bit slower 
than I would have liked, but 
the end totally made up for 
it. 

The first part of the movie 
ends up being a bunch of 
guys dressed in black, carry- 
ing guns and running 
through dark corridors. This 
is representative of the 
game. I find myself aimless- 
ly running around with a 
game gun for hours every 
time 1 play it (but then 
again, I'm not the greatest 
gamer). 

If I were to rate this movie 
on the last half hour alone, I 
would call it amazing. Once 
the plot twisted together, I 
totally got sucked in. 

The cinematographer then 
threw in a 10 minute POV 
sequence, and all you see is 



Reaper's point of view. It 
looked exactly like I was 
playing the game, except 
this guy was doing way bet- 
ter than I ever did. The 
movie was then capped off 
by one of the sweetest fist- 
fights I've seen in quite 
some time. 

I'm giving this film a 
decent rating because the 
end made up for the slow 
beginning, and I commend 
the writers on actually 
building a plot around a 
game, which was essentially 
plotless, plus it had all the 
blood and violence 1 expect- 
ed. 

However, if you're not 
down for blood and violence 
this week, "North Country" 
and "Stay" both recently 
opened in Clarion, and 
"Elizabethtown" is still 
showing. 



Ciaripn University Department of Theatre Presents: 



THE INSIDE CIJT E4IKy T4LE! 



M 



Inside-Out Fairytale" is a musical written by Clarion University Students 
featuring selections from these famous shows: 

Wicked 

Seussical the Musical 

Once Upon a Mattress 

Cinderella 

Into the Woods 

the Wiz 

Beauty & the Beast 



EKEE $EC>V E€E AEL! 



Friday, October 28th & Saturday, October 29th, 2005 

HART CHAPEL 
8:00 pm 




'Charlie' visits Peirce 

The University Activities Board (UAB) prcst'iiit'd 
"Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" Oct. 20 through 
23. Although this movie is said to be a remake of th(- 
1971 film "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory." it 
is particularly very different. It is based on Ronald 
Dahl's 1964 children's fantasy novel. Although this 
modernized version is based primarily on the book, it 
tends to portray many of the same characteristics and 
ideas from the previous film starring Gene Wilder as 
Willy Wonka. 

In this modern film, Johnny Depp plays the part of 
Willy Wonka, and definitely gives a quite interesting 
performance. Depp is portrayed in a creepy way 
because he is so extremely thin and wears white make- 
up caked on his face, almost making him look dead. In 
the film, a poor. English boy. Charhe Bucket, seems to 
be the luckiest boy in the world when he finds one of 
five golden tickets in his Wonka candy bar. Each kid 
that finds one of these golden tickets is given the oppor- 
tunity to go to the Wonka factory, where they are all 
given a lesson suiting his or her shortcomings. 

As the children are outdone, one by one, from the 
chocolate factory, each done in by greedy overindul- 
gence, director Burton makes the factory a place of 
danger and wonder The movie has a much darker, 
creepier tone than in the original. It seems that it is 
meant to me disturbing, and at different times 
throughout the film, it definitely is. At the end of 
"Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," the last kid stand- 
ing - guess who - wins a very special prize. 

KIM CAMMUSO 

Wind Ensembie performs 

Wind Ensemble performed on Oct. 20 at 7:30 p.m. in 
Marwick-Boyd Auditorium, under the direction of Dr. 
Hubert Toney, Jr. The Latin program consisted of "La 
Fiesta Mexicana" by H. Owen Reed, "Amparito Roca" 
by Jamie Texidor, arranged by Aubry Winter, and 
"Santa Fe Saga" by Morton Gould. 

JEANNETTE GOOD 

perform recitais 

Lori Klimek performed her senior trumpet recital on 
Oct. 21 at 7:30 p.m. in Marwick-Boyd Auditorium. She 
played "Allegro" by Antonio Vivaldi, "Sonata for 
Trumpet and Piano" by Norman Dello Joio, "Caprice" 
by Joseph Turrin and "Prayer for St. Gregory" by Alan 
Hovhaness. Vencent Brewer accompanied on "My 
Spirit Be Joyful" by J.S. Bach. Bonnie Ferguson accom- 
panied her on piano and organ. 

William Henry performed his senior pwno recital on . 
Oct. 23 at 3:15 p.m. in Marwick-Boyd Auditorium. He 
performed "Praeludium and Fuga in B Flat Major" by 
J.S. Bach, "Sonata quasi una Fantasia Opus 27, No. 2" 
("Moonlight Sonata") by Ludwig van Beethoven, 
"Sonatine for the Piano" by Maurice Ravel and 
"Toccata" by Aram Khachaturian. 

Michael Dean performed his senior trombone recital 
on Oct. 23 at 7^30 p.m. in Hart Chapel. He performed 
"Sonata 11" by Johann Ernst Galliard, "Cavatine" by 
Camille Saint-Saens, "Bonebits" by Arthur 
Frackenpohl, "Concert Piece in Fugal Style" by Allen 
Ostrander and "Sonatina" by Robert W. Jones. Janice 
Grunenwald accompanied on piano. 

JEANNETTE GOOD 

Rocky VI coming soon 

The "Rocky" series will move on to six. Sylvester 

Stallone will be shooting a sixth "Rocky" film in Los 

Angeles and Philadelphia this December. "Rocky 

Balboa" was written and will be directed by Stallone. 

Sly has been persuing this project for years, but it has 

just now been accepted for distribution by Columbia 

Pictures. Rocky dwells in the City of Brotherly Love 

after his retirement. He comes out of retirement, 

intending not to go at it full-board. But after being ' 

challenged by reigning heavyweight champ, the media 

makes it hysteria. 

"Rocky I" grossed $117.3 milhon, "Rocky 11" grossed 

$85 million, "Rocky III" grossed $120.2 million, "Rocky 

IV" grossed $ 125.4 million and "Rocky V grossed a 

pitiful $40 million. A CNN poll showed that 85 percent 

of the 135,000 votes thought that "Rocky" should 

"Throw in the towel." It was only 15 percent that voted 

it "A knockout deal." , ^ „^^ ^. ,^ ,^_ 

JARED SHEATZ 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 

TAILGATE PARTY! 

When: Saturday, October 29^'' at 4:00 p.m. 
Where: Clarion llnlvcrsify Memorial Stadium 

(just inside the upper stadium gates) 
What: PSAC West game - Clarion vs. Indiana Universit>^ of PA 

(Game begins at 6:00 p.m.) 
Cost: $5.00 per person - covers food/beverage 
(includes hot dogs, chips, chili, sauerkraut and cookies) 

Come cheer the Golden Eagles on to victory! 

Contact A.'umni Relatwvs office with qucsTions al 814 393-25''2 
or ettuTil alumnt adanon. cdii. RSIT iiot required 



Need Help Using the UFRARY? 



Come to one of Carlson Library's open sessions. 

These sessions an open to all students and 

are offered on a first-come first-served basis. 

Reservations will not be accepted. 

These classes are tauqht in the Level 2 Instruction Lab in Carlson Librory - Room 201 , 



Friday, Oct. 28th: 

10:00-10:50 - Introduction to PILOT and 6enepol Periodical Datd)ases 

1:00-1:50 - Introduction to Research Resources in History 

Monday, Oct. 31st: 

4:00-4:50 - Introduction to PILOT and General Periodical Databases 

5:00-5:50 - Introckjction to Research Resources in Philosophy 

Tuesday, Nov. 1st: 

10:00-11:00 - Introduction to Research Resources in History 

3:00-4:00 - Introduction to PILOT and General Periodical Databases 



* ■ • p V 



Page 10 



nffi CLARION CALL 



October 27. 2005 



October 27. 2005 



THE CLARION CALL 



Page 11 



Clmitkis 



Ureek \k Travii l^jiplovnipiil, For Ml Personals, and lieneral \k 




Congrats Chairs of the 
Week Keren and Mandy! 
■Love, Your AZ Sisters 

Congrat.s Exec on Si.sters of 

the Week! 

•Love, Your AZ Sisters 



Happy 
Everyone! 
•Love. AZ 



Halloween 



Congratulations Erica on 
Sister of the Week... again! 
-AIT 

Happy birthday Haley, 
Sloan and Heather! 
■V. Your AIT Sisters 

Congrats to our Sister of the 
Week. Ashlee Noca! 
•AOE 

Happy Halloween Phi Sigs! 
Hope your weekend is filled 
with yummy treats! 
-<DII 

<MI, 

Keep up the great work this 

semester! Keep trucking 

along, Thanksgiving will be 

here soon! 

■L.I.T.P., Juhe 

4)11 hope everyone has a 
fun and safe Halloween!! 

QENERAL 



DO YOU THINK YOU 



MIGHT BE PREGNANT? 
CALL AAA LIFE SEK- 
VICES AT 226-7007. FREE 
& CONFIDENTIAL. 

Money for College. 

The Army is currently offer- 
ing sizable bonuses of up to 
$20,000. In addition to the 
cash bonu.ses, you may quah 
ify for up to $70,000 for col- 
lege through the 
Montgomery (II Bill and 
Army College Fund. Or you 
could pay back up to 
$65,000 of qualifying stu- 
dent loans through the 
Army's Loan Repayment 
Program. To find out more, 
call 814-227 2313. 

...^ 

mimmmmmMmmmmmmmit^mmmmmmm 

APARTMENTS accommo 
dating 1-4 people and 
Houses for 4-8 people 
AVAILABLE FOR the 
FALL 2006/ SPRING 2007 
semesters. B]xceptionally 
nice and well-maintained 
Off Campus Housing!!! 
Come and check us out and 
see for yourself! Call Patty 
or Andrea at 814-226-4430 
(Office) 814-229-5190 or 
814-7453121. 

APARTMENTS for 34 peo- 
ple and HOUSES for 47 
people available for the Fall 
2006/Spring 2007 semes 
ters. Get a great place for 
next year! Call Barb at 814- 
226-0757 or 814 379-9721 
for more info. 



ROLL OUT OF BED AND 

GO TO CLASS! Houses and 
apartments next to campus. 
See them at www.grayand- 
company.net or call FREE 
Gray and Co. 877-562- 1020. 

Houses for rent 2005 06. 

Close to campus. For 2 and 4 
females. Call 814-226-6867. 

Next to campus, a wide 
selection of houses and 
apartments for Fall 
2006/Spring 2007 and 
Summer 2006. Various 
accommodation for groups 
of 2 to 8 students. View 
them on-line at 

www.ace3nrental.com or call 
814-227-1238. 

Two person, 2 bedroom 
apartment for Spring 2(K)6. 

Includes utilities. Call 
Ferguson Rental at 814-379- 
3386 or 814764 6606 ext. 
125. 

Two, 3 and 4 person apart- 
ments for Fall 2006/Spring 
2007. Includes utilities. Call 
Ferguson Rental at 814-379- 
3385 or 814-764-5506 ext. 
125. 

3 Bedroom house on Wilson 
Ave. Half block from cam- 
pus for Fall 
2006/Spring2007 semesters. 
No pets. Call 814-772-9094 
or 814-594-0981. 

House for rent! Available 
Spring semester for one 
semester lease. 

Approximately two blocks 



from campus with offstreet 
parking. Semi-furnished, up 
to four students. 814-227- 
8029. 




Bahamas 



Cruise! f) 
Includes 
Celebrity 
Acapulco 



Spring Break 

days from $299! 
Meals, MTV 
Parties! Cancun, 
Jamaica From 
$499! Campus Reps Needed! 
PromoCode: 31 www.spring- 
breaktravel.com 1 ■800-678- 
6386 

Spring Break 2006. Travel 
with STS, America's #1 
Student Tour Operator to 
Jamaica. Cancun, Acapulco, 
Bahamas and Florida. Now 
hiring on-campus reps. Call 
for group discounts. 
Information/Reservations 
1-800-648-4849 or 

www.8t8travel.com. 




Congrats to Senator R. 
Schmitz and Senator Knebel 
on this week's Senators of 
the Week! 
-Student Senate 

Julie Preston, 



Thanks for being a good 
friend towards me. 
From, James Griest 

Meghan. 

I wish 1 was a real boy, too. 

■Love, Dusty 

Nate. 

Only losers leave for 
Halloween. 
Dusty 

Mel's mom. 

Thanks for the new toy. It is 
all I can think about, 
•liove, Dusty 

Kath, 

Quit worrying about Jeter 

and tell your son to blank 

the blank blank. 

Love. Dina's Sun 

Shasta and Kristen. 
Thanks for being great 
assistants! You rock! 
-Ash B. 

Todd (A.K.A. GiUigan) 
Thanks for helping me sur- 
vive Icebox. I^ve ya. YAME! 
-Ashley, (A.K.A. Mary Ann) 

Janine, 

Get well soon! I missed you 

this week! The kids in your 

class probablv miss you too! 

•Ash 




CLARION AREA 
CHAMBER OF BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 



Th« Clarion Araa Chambar of Business and industry 

announcas its musical antartainmant saarcli for 2006. 

In addition to tha 52-ytar old Autum Laaf Fastivai, tlia Clarion 

Chambar has an activa avants caiandar. Events induda: 

tha Annual Dinnar, Spring Fling, 

Fair Waathar Fridays, I Lova Clarion, 

Jab Fast ( J«BE, Arts A Bluas Fastivai,) Tasta of Clarion, 

and Clarlon% First Night. 

MirSICAL ENf TERTAINHIENT 
IS BEING SOUGHT! 

Singars and/or musicians plaasa submit your promotional 

pa<it«t {audio cd or tapa, raviaws, prass ralaasas, photoa, ate.) 

to tha addrass balow: 

Eniartaittmaftt Comenittc* 

ci»rH»n Araa Chambar of Businass & industry 

4 S ^<nutK Fifth Avanua 

K's^M-^wK- PA 1^214 

- ; .« ^«ta«Mit«« m ra««ivlflg promotSana! 
*n "«tr*s!l fiktff&XMiTi:' 

Js «f 8V«jnt$, submt5Si9n» 




Sara and Enuna, 
Happy Halloween to one of 
my dearest friends - our 
daughters rock! (Yes, I'm 
aware mine is a dog.) Emma 
makes an adorable "black 
cat" 
Ijove you guys. IP Ashley 

J -Money, 

If you ain't gonna party then 
you gotta go. Have a great 
Halloween! I wish I was 
there with you. 26 days. 

- V Sweet Chinchilla 

Boy, 

You make me so happy I 

don't know what I would be 

without you. 

-The Girl 

Mel. 

What should I get him for 
Christmas? I know it's only 
October but I need to start 
thinking of ideas. Please 
don't make fun of me. 

- Your fellow editor 

Tom, 

I hope that you like the 
gourd that I painted for you. 
I painted it orange so that it 
would look like a pumpkin. 
It still looks way better than 
your French pumpkin. I'm 
just joking around. I hope 
that you have a Happy 
Halloween. 

- Pepperjack Cheese Lover 

G-Star, 

Hope your Halloween is 

filled with yummy treats 

and specialness! 

-V Me 

Patterz, 

Just reminding you I miss 

you! 

- Mwah 

Cassiopeia, 

Thanks for the awesome tri- 

folds. Can't wait to see 

Friday's! 

-Beetlejuice 

Miss Good and Mr. Santa, 
Don't forget to whine about 
the ads next week too, or 
else I'll hit ray head with a 
pen! 
Tom Smash Quark! 

Teaberry, 

You're the most interesting 
person I know - Fosho' 
-The BK 



(TUTMirMiiGSMMGiTO^^^^^ 

m 



f 

■ Pre.^ent this coupon when 

■ you buy a Big Mac sand- 

■ wich and receive a second 

I one free, Lirvtit one food 
item per coupon, pet 

I customer, per visit Please 

■ present coupon when 
g ordering Not valid with any 



other offer 



^Expires 6/30/ 



6/30/07 



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Valid In ! 

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^^■■■■■■1^^ and Punxsutawneyj 




McDonalds 



PlZZ/t 



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V7SA 



MasterCard 



Sunday-Thursday Jlaiii-2aiii 
Friday-Saturday liaiii>3am 



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Welcome 
Back CU 
Students! 



r~2niiDiuM~orNV 

■ Topping Pizzas 



$1,39 for addirional toppinqs 



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ALL THE TITVIE!!! l2mch,8-cut,l-topping pizza Fvpircs 



Plus lax 



5/15 06 Additional Toppings 1.5«» 



I 
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CUat/ 


\thletic 


Events 


Cross Country 






Oct. 29 






@ PSAC Championships 


Nov. 11-12 


Nov 25-27 


(Shppery Rock) 


@ PSAC Championships 


lUP Tournament 


Nov. 5 






@NCAA Regionals 
(Lock Haven) 


Swiming and Diving 

Oct. 29 


Dec. 3 

@ Bloomsburg 




@ Carnegie Mellon 


Dec. 7 


FootbaU 


Oct. 30 


@ Pitt- Johnstown 


Oct. 29 
Indiana 


Clarion Diving Invitational 
Nov. 4 


Dec. 20 
Millersville 


Nov. 5 


@ Shippensburg 




Shppery Rock 








Nov. 12 


Wrestling 




@ Akron 


Nov 13 


Men's Basketball 




@ Penn State Duals 


Nov. 18-19 


Nov. 19 




@ Geneva Tournament 


Grand Valley State 


Nov. 19 




(swimming) 


@ Ashland Duals 


Nov. 30 






District of Columbia 


Nov. 20 


Nov 26 




Grand Valley State 


@ Mat Town Invitational 


Dec. 3 


(diving) 


(Lock Haven) 


@ Bloomsburg 




Dec. 4 


Dec. 7 


Women's Basketball 


@ Penn State Open 


@ Pitt- Johnstown 


Nov. 15 






Charleston 


Dec. 18 
Clarion Duals 


VolleybaU 


Nov. 19 




Nov 1 


Point Park 


Jan. 7 


@ Edinboro 




@ Lone Star Duals, 
Dallas, TX 


Nov. 5 


Nov. 23 




Lock Haven 


Ashland 






Photo courtesy of Daniel Caulfleld 
\AEN'S CROSS COUNTRY - The Clarion Men's Team recently placed second at the CMU Invite. 





anon 
coreboard 



Cross Country 

Oct. 15 

@ Waynesburg 

W- 1 of 13; M 1 of 11 

Football 

Oct. 22 
Shippensburg 
0-37, L 

Golf 

Oct. 15-16 

PSAC Championships 

lofS 



Soccer 

Oct. 23 
St. Vincent 
1-0, W 

Swimming/ Diving 

Oct. 26 
Allegheny 
W- 119-110, W 
M- 132-105, W 

Tennis 

Oct. 1 

@ Niagara 

1-7, L 



VoUeyball 

Oct. 22 

North Carolina Central 

3-2, W 

Oct. 22 
Pfieffer 
3-0, W 

Oct. 23 
Barton 
3-0, W 

Oct. 25 
Indiana 
0-3, L 




Designing Your Future 



■* Are you interested tn turtb«i£i«, y<H>r evhua- 
kicn, hut are act snve whd! io do? 

inMifutions, corporations, or non-profil 
group* using the latet tKhnolcgit'S sound 
iikoiuii'^ 

♦ Di) Vol! vvctnt to t-,irn .i tornpetitivt:' satarv 
doinf, exciting work? 

Blmmsbur^ UniversiUfs DefHirtimnt of 

histnuiwnailiH'hnolo^if Starter's 

Pro^nim muif h just jhruoni 



ril,A-l: K)iMf|4>iLv'"'* 


V(R'rijAf*()Pi??^HoiiSii ^ 


In? HsH^ H) Wii"^ 


1 ■ . VM. 


\ ISIT THE DITAHTWKNT WFRSfff f OR 


MORI KFORMAllON; 


HTI?://j}T.in.m)MU.l{DlA 


\lRTUM()PINHOi;SLCfM 


ORi,.\i! m.m.mb 


■ HiO\!U,.r.- ■■:--,,:r: 





M;^€^n/ 




i>iA4^ 



B« sure to stop by our OPEN HOUSE this 

Saturday, October 29 from lpm-4pinF 

Enter for your chance to win a WaMVIart GIFT CARD! 

IMteratj'Rlwl 



Enter to will, 
where yii'reliviiipexlpr! 



fiariwuipiiapitteiilixtn 




VILLAGKS 







Doug Knepp -Inti^miraJL Riecr»atiorv «&Club Spoil Duector 393-1667 



Ultimate Frisbee C^hamps 

Congratulations to the 

"GLASS BOX OF EMOTION" for 

defeating the Guacs on Wednesday 
October 1 9, by a score of 7-4 to win (he 
Ultimate Frisbee Championship! 

Team Members Include: Matt Steele. 
Rachel Bogdan, Travis, .larcd Gagnc, 
Ryan Peterson, Matt Ilubcr, Nick Guiliani 
Megan Muchicko, and Rose Bogdan 




Indoor Soccer Results 

10/24 Men 

Iniemationals Bust-a-movc 4-0 

10/24/05 <:o-Rcc 

6 Guys 2 Girls. . . Filk C. Crew 2-0 
John Rookies 4-1 

Hockey Results 

]0T9()5 
remiinalors Wannabees 4-1 

Drunk Bandits Temiinators 5-? 




Gridiron Challenge Week #1 Winners 

Andrew Biylhc, Mall Krcidcr, 

Diane Simpson, Anfcrticc Marshniaii, 

and Harold fields. 





Old Spice College Gridiron Challenge 

Pick the correct winners of the 3 college 
football games each week and you could win 
anything form a T-shirt to an X Box (iamc 
System or an l-pod lio/c Sound Dock!! 

WWW.ACIS-SPORTS.CQM 

Playing is FREE 
Friday, 1 0/28 - 1 ast day lo register for: 

3 on 3 Basketball 
Table Tennis 

Indoor Soccer 

Resisicr on-line or at the Rec Center"' 



Golf Scramble Winners 

Team: Long Ballz 
Members: Ryan Kren savage, Scott 
Winkler, Mark Staigerwald, and 
Lou Jesiolkcwic. Total Score 59. 

Flag Football Results 

10/19/05 

Annex of Puerto R Prime Time 40-12 

Nuphies The Heat F 

Dudes We Cant Stop Nuphies 50-20 

DaHuSlla/ Lady Canes 26-12 

Quick 6 StMu 46-20 

Dudes We Can't Stop No Ma'am F 

Steelers Ball/ Deep 36-15 

Flag Football Standings 

Top 10 as of 10/ 1 y, 05 (W-l.-F) 
15. Free Bailers (9-0-1) 

12. Prime Time (9-1) 

9. DaHuSllaz (8-1) 

21. Dudes We Can't Stop (7-1) 

6. HardMurims5 (6-0-1) 
5. The Beers (6-1) 
3. .lust Ball (6-1) 
19. Annexation of Puerto Rico (5-1) 

7. Schlil/'s (4-4) 
1. Quick 6 (4-5) 

♦Flag Football and Hockey Play offs start 
next week. Regular season rain-out games 
will not be rescheduled. 



Volleyball Results 

Women's 10/19/05 
Sexy Women Beth Mudrey 21 -4, 21 -1 7 

10/25/05" 
Girls Sexy Women 2 1 - 1 0, 2 1 - 1 1 

Co-Rec 10/19/05 
Lady Canes Team Mike Coynes F 
Delta Delta Tuna 1 aeos n/a 

M. Hartman The Incrcdibles V 

Could Use Imp. Wc Suek 21-19,21-10 

Roofers The Nifty Kcttei-s n/a 

10/25/05 
Lady Canes Incrediblcs 2 1 - 1 L 23-2 1 
Cheer CU Tuna Tacos 21-12, 23-21 
Outsiders N. Netters 21-10, 18-21,21-1* 
A. Challenged Rooters F 

Ligcrs ^ Could Use Imp. 21-9,21-8 

Table Tennis Results 

10/20/05 
Josh Mcehan Ryan Sapp F 

Phil .lohanscn Kyle Bacha 3-0 

10/24/05 
L. Dugovieh Angie Allgeier n-a 

Outdoor Recreation Note: 

Next week we begin preparation for winter 
rentals including CC Skis, sleds, and tubes. 

Intramural 's on the Web 
clarlon.edu/intraniurals 

or from the CV? home page click on 

Athlr^tlrt: ih^n Intrnmnrnk 






V •' » » V 



Page 10 



TU£ CLARION CALL 



October 27, 2005 



tlmilitis 



lirdtiKTni\ilhiipliiiiiinil.l'iii'lli'iil.lVi'\iiiiiilviiiiillii>iii<nillil^ 



GREEKS 



rongrat.s Chuim of the 
Week Koron and Mandyl 
•Ijove, Your AZ Sisters 

("niiui'.ii.'^ I'Aec on Si.sieis of 

the Week! 

•IjOVP, Your AZ Sisters 



Happy 
Everyone! 
•hove. \7. 



Congniiulatiniis Krica on 
Sister olthe Week... again! 
•AIT 

Happy birthday Haley. 
Sloan and Henlher! 
•IF. Your All Sisters 

('(iiiiirats t(» our ."^ister ol the 
Wj'ek. .Ashlee Noca! 

Happy Halloween Phi Sigsl 
Hope your weekend is till(>d 
with yununy treats! 

*mz 

cMI, 

Keep up the great work this 
semester! Keep ti'ucking 
along. Thanksgiving will be 
here soon' 
■L.I.T.i'.,.!ulie 

tl->il hope everNone has a 
i'un and sale Halloween!! 



MKJHT BE PKEONANT? 
CAM, AAA LIKE SKK- 
VICES .\T 226 7007, I 'NEE 
.<: COXMDKNTIAI, 

Money for College. 
The Army is currently offer- 
ing sizabh^ bonn.ses of up to 
$20,000. In addition to the 
cash bonuses, you nia\' ipiah 
ify for up to ,S70,()00 lor col- 
"~~~~~~' Ic'jfe through the 

Halloween Montgoinerv (11 E.ill and 
Army College Fuml. Or you 
could pay back up to 
$()."). 000 of (|ualii'ying .stu- 
dent loans thi'ough the 
Army's Loan Repavnunt 
Program. To find out more. 



call 814-227 2313. 



FOK RENT 



DO YOU THINK YOU 



APARTMENTS accoramo 
dating 14 people and 
Houses for 4 8 people 
AVAILABLE FOR the 
FALL 2006/ SPRING 2007 
semesters. Kxct'ptitmaii}- 
nice and well-maintained 
Off Cami)us dousing!!' 
Come and check u> oui and 
see for y(airselt'! Call Patty 
or Andrea at 814 226 4430 
(Office) 814-229 5190 or 
814 745-3121, 

AP.\RTMENTS for 3 4 peo 
pie and HOUSES for 4 7 
people avaOable for the Fall 
2006/Spring 2007 semes 
ters. <!et a great place for 
next year' Call r)ai'b al 814- 
226-0757 or 814 3799721 
for more mfo. 



ROU. OUT OF BED AND 
GO TO CLASS! House.n and 
apartments next to campus. 
See them at wvvw.grnyand- 
company.net or call FHEK 
Gray and Co. 877 662 1020 

Houses for rent 2005 06. 

Close to caniifus. For 2 and I 
females. Call 814 2266867. 

Next to campus, a wide 
selection of houses and 
apartments for Fall 
2006/Spring 2007 and 
Summer 2006. Various 
accommodation for groups 
of 2 to 8 students. View 
th<'m online at 

www.aceyrental.cora or call 
814-227 1238 

Two person, 2 bedroom 
apartment for Spring 2006. 

Iiuludes ulilUK'^, Call 
Ferguson Rental at 814379- 
3385 or 814-764 5506 ext. 
125 

Two. 3 and 4 person apart 
ments for Fall 2006/Spring 
2007. Includes utdities. Call 
Ferguson Rental at 814-379- 
3385 or 814 764 5506 ext. 
125. 

3 Bedroom house on Wilson 
Ave. Half block from cam- 
pus for Fall 
20()ti/Spring2007 semesters. 
No pets, (^ill 814-772-9094 
or 814 594 0981. 

House for rent! Available 
S|)rlng semester for one 
semester lease. 

Approximately two blocks 



from eampus with offsti'eoi 
parking. Semifurnished. up 
to four students. 814-227- 
8029 

TRAVfeL 

•ptaaaHMHnHaManMMMMnnanaHilJtaH 

Bahamas Spring Break 
Cruise! 5 davs from $20i)! 
Includes Meals. MTV 
Celebrity Parties! Caiicun, 
Acai)ulco. 'Jamaica From 
$199! Campus Reps Needed! 
PromoCode: :\\ www.spring- 
breaktravel.cora 1 800 678 
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Spring Break 2006. Travel 
with STS. .Xnierica's #1 
Student Tour Operator to 
•lamaica. Cancun. Acapulco. 
Bahamas and Florida. Now 
hiring on-campus reps. Call 
for group discounts. 
Information/Reservations 
1800-6484849 or 

www . ststra vel .com . 

ilWUUMBWaBWaWBBaBBBIBBWilillillllMIUWIMWW'W 

ERSONALS 



Congrats to Senator R. 
.Sf'hrnitz and Senator Knebel 
on this week's Senators of 
the Week! 
■Student Senate 

dulie Preston, 



Thanks for 
friend towards me. 
From. Jamt'H Griest 

Meghan, 

I w ish I was n real boy, tm), 
hove, Duitv 



Nate. 

Only losers 

Halloween. 

-Dustv 



leave for 



Mefs mom. 

Thanks for the new toy. It Ib 
all I can think about. 
•l^we. Dusty 

Kath, 

(^lit worrving about Jeter 

and tell \(an' son to blank 

the blank lilank. 

Lo\('. Dma's S«*n 

.Shasta and Kir^ten, 
Thanks for being great 
assistants! You rock! 
*A»h B. 

Todd I A. K, A. Cilhgan) 
Thanks for helping me sur- 
vive Icebox. Love ya. ^'.\ME' 
-Ashhn. I A.K.A, Mary Ann' 

-Janme. 

Get well soon! 1 missed you 

this week! The kids in yttur 

class jirobably nnss vou too! 

-Ash 



Y 


1 

J 


mIU 


U 


IP 




■1 


^wM. 


^M^.y^.y>^-^^^'^ 





^km 







CLARION AREA 
CHAMBER OF BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 



The Clarion Area Chamber of Business and Industry 

announces its musical entertainment search for 2006. 

In addition to the S2-year old Autum Leaf Festival, the Clarion 

Chamber has an active events calendar. Events include: 

the Annual Dinner, Spring Fling, 

Fair Weather Fridays, i Love Clarion, 

Jab Fest (Jazz, Arts & Blues Festival,) Taste of Clarion, 

and Clarion's First Night. 

MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT 
IS BEING SOUGHT! 

Singers and/or musicians please submit your promotional 

pacltet (audio cd or tape, reviews, press releases, photos, etc.) 

to the address beiow: 

Entertainment Committee 

Clarion Area Chamber of Business & industry 

41 South Fifth Avenue 

Clarion, PA 16at4 

The chamber is also intetested in receiving promotional 

packets from "street perf romers." 

Dtie to the continuous schedule of events, submissions 

WILL NOT be returned. 



wwur%c1arionpa.com 
»1 4-226-91 61 




Sara and Kinma, 

Happy Haliowfen to one of 

my dettreBt friiMids - onr 

daughters rock! (Yes. I'm 

awjnv mine is a dog.) Kinina 

makes an adorable "black 

cat" 

•Love you guys. ^ .Ashley 

J'.MolU'>. 

Il'yoiiaiiit gonna i)ariy then 
you gotta go, Hfue a great 
HallowtM^n! 1 wish 1 v\as 
there with you. 2(> days. 

■ 1> Sweet ( 'huK'lnll.'i 

Itey. 

You make me so ha|)|)y 1 
don"t know what I would be 

without you. 
-'riteCirl 

.Mel. 

What .should 1 get him for 
Christmas? 1 know it's only 
Oclober bin 1 need to start 
thinking of ideas. Please 
don't make fim of me. 

■ Your fellow editor 

Tom. 

1 hope that you like the 

gourd that 1 painted for you. 

I innnted it orange so that it 

would look like a piunpkin. 

It still looks way better than 

your French pumpkin, I'm 

just joking around. 1 hope 

that you have a Happy 

llnlloween. 

- I'epperjack Cheese Lover 

(rStar, 

Hope your Halloween is 

filled with yummy treats 

and specialness! 

■V Me 

I'atlerz. 

•lu-^t reminding you T miss 

you I 

■ Mwah 

Cassiopeia. 

Thanks for the awesome tri- 
f(dds. ('an't wait to see 
Friday's! 
Beetlejuice 

Miss (iood and Ali; Santa, 
Don't forget to whaie about 
the ads next week too. or 
else I'll bit my he;\d with a 
pelil 
Tom Smash Quark! 

Teal)e)'r\', 

You're the most interesting 
person I know Fosho' 
-The BK 



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October 27. 2005 



THE CLARION CALL 



Page 11 



CUat/ 


Vthletic 


Events 


Cross Country 






Oct. 29 






'' FHAC C'hampion.ships 


Nov 11-12 


Nov. 25-27 


(Slippery Hock) 


# PSAC Championships 


lUP Tournament 


Nov. 5 






I" NCiVA Regionals 
(Lock Haven) 


Swiming and Diving 

Oct. 2f) 


Dec. 3 

^ Bloomsburg 




@ Carnegie Mellon 


Dec. 7 


Football 


Oct. 30 


® Pitt-Johnstown 


Oct. 29 
Indiana 


Clarion DivniK Invitational 
Nov. 4 


Dec. 20 
Mill(>rsville 


Nov. 5 
Slippery Hock 


® Shippensburg 
Nov 12 


Wrestling 


Men's Basketball 


fe Akron 


Nov. 13 

® Penn State Duals 


Nov. 18-19 


Nov If) 




(it: Geneva Tournament 


Grand Vallev State 


Nov. 19 




(swimming) 


@ Ashland Duals 


Nov. 30 






District of Columbia 


Nov 20 


Nov. 26 




CJrand Valley State 


@ Mat Town Invitational 


Dec. 3 


(diving) 


(Lock Haven) 


(a Bloomsburg 




Dec. 4 


Dec. 7 


Women's Basketball 


@ Penn State Open 


fe Pitt-Johnstown 


Nov. 15 






Charleston 


Dec. 18 
Clarion Duals 


Volleyball 


Nov 19 




Nov 1 


Point Park 


Jan. 7 


(a, Edinboro 




@ Lone Star Duals, 
Dallas. TX 


Nov. 5 


Nov 23 




Lock Haven 


Ashland 






Photo courtesy of Daniel Caulfield 
WE/V'S CROSS COUNTRY - The Clarion Men's Team recently placed second at the CMU Invite. 



C\cxr\or\ 
Scoreboard 



Cross Country 


Soccer 


Oct. 15 


Oct. 23 


@ Wayneshurg 


St. Vincent 


W- 1 of 13;M 1 of 11 


1-0. W 


Football 


Swimming/ \ 


Oct. 22 


Oct. 26 


Shippensburg 


Allegheny 


0-37. L 


W- 119-110. W 




M- 132-105. W 


Golf 




Oct. 15-16 


Tennis 


PSAC Championships 


Oct. 1 


1 of 8 


(" Niagara 




1-7. L 



Volleyball 



Oct. 22 






North Carolina 


(\'ntral 


3-2, W 






Oct. 22 






Pfieffer 






3-0, W 






Oct. 23 






Barton 






3-0. W 






Oct. 25 






Indiana 






0-3. L 








1 


i 





III I liU'ion 




0, 




^ Be sure to stop by our OPEN HOUSE this 
Saturday, October 29 from lpm~4pm! 
Enter for your chance to win a Wal-Mart GIR CARD! 

Li'iKQIu llffli>' 

iiillliiiwiaiyHlvil 
i:i,}iiiiiil'^in21-l 

iiitiiiiuiipiwiii{iiiiiii>'iit.imii 



iDlertowJD, 

MM out 

where p'relvinipxt year! 




\ :ii \ui-s 



s XN F.^UJ.jd'-'Ul.^^tMt ■,-'n,-vl!:'> tt;< '.IJV-! 







D0U5 Ki'iepp -Irdrairtmai. R.ecie.5iliou. & 'I'bib Spoil Du**<'toi 393-166' 




10/2.Q/D5 



I Itimate FrJsbee ( hamps 

CongraUilations !o thc 
"GLASS BOX OF EMOTION" foil 
defeating llic Guaes on Wednesday. 
Oelohcr !'). h_\' a seorc 0!" '~-4 lo win ihej 
Ultimate Frisbee Championship!^ 
'loam Members Inelude: Malt Steele. | 
Rachel Boudan, TraNis, .hired (liiL-ne.' 
Rviiii Peterson. Mail lluber. Nick (initiani. 
Meuan Muehicko. and Rose lioL'dari, ' 



(w-jdiron Ch«Uk-iiae VNcck r.l Wiisncrs 

AiKlrew iilyihe. Mall Krcuiei, 

Diane Sunpsoi^. Aniernee Marsiiina;;. 

and Harold i lekis 





t%i««<i 



Indoor Soccer Results 

li);24 MC!1 

Inicnialionals Bii.si-a-mt)\c 4-0 

l(),24.(i.>( o-Ra■ 
6(.llys2(il!•is... hike, (lew 2-0 
.lohn Rookies 4- 1 

Hockey Results 

iemnnalors Wannabees 4-1 

Drunk Handils Terniinators 5-^ 



Old Spice College Gridiron Challenge 

Pick Ihe cor'ec! wmno's o* the 3 coHeye 
football games eacn week and you couks win 
anything form a T-stiirt to an .\ Box danie 
System oiaii kpod Bo/c Sound Dock!! 

WWW.AC IS-SPORTS.CQM 

Playing is FREE 

Friday. 10' 2K - I a>t ikiv to reuislcr ;br: 

3 on 3 Basketball 
I able Tennis 

Indoor Soccer 

Register on-line nr ai ihe Rcc (Vnler'" 



Golf Scramble Winners 

Team: Long Ballz 
Members: Ryan Kren savage, Seott 
Winkler, Mark Staigerwald, and 
l.oLi Jesiolkewie. Total Score 59. 

Fla<» Football Results 

Annex of Puerto R Prime Time 40- 1 2 

Nupiiics The Heat k 

DiKles We Cant Stop Nuphies 50-20 

DnlluStla/ Lady Cunes 26-12 

giiiek 6 StMu 46-20 

Diules We ("an'i Stop No Ma'am L 

Steelers Ball/ Deep ->6-L5 

ria<> Football StaiHlinjJs 

(W-i-i) 
(9-0-1) 

(9-1) 
(8-1) 
21. Dudes We Can't Slop (7-1) 

6. HardMuflinsS (6-0-1) 
5. the Beers (6-1) 
3. .lust Ball (6-1) 
19. .Annexation of Puerto Rico (.5-1 ) 

7. Sehlii/\s (4-4) 
1. Quick 6 (4-5) 

♦Flag loolball and Hockey Play offs start 
nes.1 week. Regular season rain-out games 
w ill not be rescheduled. 



lop lOasolK). 1'AU.^ 

15, Iree Bailers 
12. Prime Time 
9. Da HuSlla/ 



19. 







■» 1 T 



V ollc>ball Results 

\N omen's 10' 19 05 
Sexy Women Beth M udrey 21-4,21-17 

1 0/25^05 
Girls Sexy Women 21-10. 21-11 

(^o-Rec 10 l'>05 
Lady Canes Team Mike Coynes F 
Delta Delta Tuna Taeos n'a 

M.ilartman The Inercdibles !■ 

Could I isc Imp. We Suck 21 

Roofers The Nifty Net ters 

1()'25A)5 
ladvCanes Inercdibles 21-11.-.'--. 
Cheer CLi Tuna Tacos 2M2, 2.T21 
Outsiders N. Netlers 21-10, 18-21,21 
A. Challenged Rooters F 

Ligers Could Cse Imp. 2I-').2L8 

Table fennis Results 

M20'05 
.losh Mcehan Ryan Sapp 
Phil .lohansen Kyle Bacha 

11L24^^>^ 
1 . Dugovich .'\ngie Allgcicr 

Outdoor Recreation Note: 

Next week we begin preparation for wiuier 
rentals including CC Skis, sleds, and tubes. 

IntnimuYaVs on the Web 
ciarion.edu/intranuirals 

or from ihc Cl'P home page click on 

AitiltMirw ihtMi lti1r'ininrn'< 



F" 

3-0 



n-a 



I 



Page 12 



THE CLARION CALL 



October 27. 2005 



Todav: 



football km al Ship 



U M al Wll 



Sfirts 

Golden Eagle football finishes season 
winless on the road; loses to Ship 37-0 



Ryan Cornman 

Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_rclcornman®clarion.eclu 

SHIPPENSBURG, Oct. 22- 
Shippensburg running back 
Aaron Dykes rushed 25 
times for 139 yards and a 
touchdown, and Jamie 
Reder booted three field 
goals as the Red Raiders 
defeated Clarion 37-0 on 
Saturday afternoon at Seth 
Grove Stadium. 

Reder booted his first field 
goal, a 27-yarder. early in 
the first quarter getting 
Shippensburg off on the 
right foot and a 3-0 lead. 

The Red Raiders struck 
again quickly making the 
score 10-0 when Dykes 
scored on a 3-yard run. Ship 
led 10-0 at the end of the 
first quarter. 

Shippensburg then 

expanded their advantage 
to a 20-0 lead. Red Raider 
quarterback Tony Gomez 
found halfback Kyle Fogarty 
alone in the middle of the 
field for a 32-yard TD pass. 
Reder booted his second 
field goal from 33-yards out. 

Clarion, although behind, 
would not lay down and be 
rolled over on. Showing a 
sign of life late in the first 




Photo courtesy of John Thompson 

CLARION SUFFERS FIFTH LOSS - The Golden Eagles got off to a fast start earlier in the season 
beating Kutztown to go 2-1, but have since gone 1-4 including Saturday's 37-0 loss to Ship. 



half Clarion put together a 
nice drive down to the 
Shippensburg 20 yard Une. 

However, an Eric Yonish 
pass was picked off by Red 
Raider linebacker Frank, 
don't confuse me with 
Patrick, Duffy leaving the 
score at 20-0 at the half. 

The Golden Eagles 

defense, which has been 
very impressive over the 
last few weeks, struck again 
in the third quarter. Cedric 



Bowling forced a fumble and 
Rich McCune recovered for 
the Eagles at the Ship 43. 

The victory was short- 
lived, however, as on the 
next play running back Josh 
Province fumbled the ball 
right back to the Red 
Raiders ending the threat. 
The Eagles offense 

showed another sign of life 
in the third quarter Yonish 
hit Michael Byrd for 14 
yards to the Ship 30 to put 



the Eagles in business. 

However, Clarion failed to 
gain another yard on the 
drive and was forced to punt 
it back to the Red Raiders. 

Reder booted another field 
goal, his third of the day, 
later in the third to give 
Ship a 23-0 lead. 

Ship would also later add 
a 29-yard Mike Harris 29- 
yard TD catch from backup 
quarterback Rick Henshaw 
and a Jeremy Sickeri seven- 



yard touchdown run to close 
out the scoring on their end. 

Clarion still refusing to 
give up tried to score again, 
lead by a 34-yard pass from 
Yonish to Eagle's Tight End 
Michael Dominic. 

After Driving down to the 
26 however, Yonish was 
again intercepted this time 
by the Red Raiders' 
Jonathan Aldridge. The 
interception stopped yet 
another impressive Clarion 
drive to end in no points. 

Although giving up the 37 
points, the defense was 
again a highlight including 
three sacks, one each from 
Brock Luke, Matt Ritter, 
and Kevin Rigby. 

Clarion returns home to 
Memorial Stadium, where 
they are 3-1 on the season, 
to finish out the rest of the 
season. The next game is a 
PSAC West Rivalry game 
against lUP on Saturday 
night at 6 p.m. 

The Golden Eagles are 
also home the final week of 
the season when they clash 
with Slippery Rock. 

With the loss Clarion 
dropped to 3-5 overall and 1- 
3 in the conference. 
Shippensburg improved to 
its overall record to 4-5 and 
2-3 in the PSAC West. 



1 

•«MI| 



Game Not^: 



■ Ship controlled th« 
clock finishing th« 
afternoon with an 11 
minute advantage in 
time of possession. 

■ Clarion comitted Ave 
turnovers; the Red 
Raiders had Just one. 

■ Clarion has lost eigit 
straight road $&rms 
dating baci^ to last sea- 
son. 

<■ The Golden Eagtei 
were outscored by a 
combined total of 167- 
21 in four road gfktrm 
this season. 

■ Clarion must win its 
last two games to fin- 
ish the season with a 
.500 winning percent- 
age. 



Sports feature: 

Student motivates fellow students 
through step aerobics classes 



Josh Woods 
Sports Editor 

s Jlwoods l@clarion .edu 



The student has become 
the teacher. Erica Wurst 
began taking step aerobics 
at Clarion University's 
Recreation Center as a 
sophomore and is now 
teaching them as a senior. 

"I helped my instructor 
teach class one day and she 
said that 1 would be good at 
it, so I decided to give it a 
try," said Wurst. "I went 
down to the center and 
talked to Diane Gardner 
and she got me all set up 
with teaching it." 

Wurst, who became 
involved with the program 
after looking for an alterna- 
tive to running, based her 
decision to teach, however, 
on motivational factors, 
rather than solely staying in 
shape. 

"It's not about that, she 
said, it's just the fact that if 
you don't have someone to 
workout with you probably 
won't do it. Being in a group 
motivates you to stick with 
it and sometimes to work 
harder than you would by 
yourself." 

In addition to that advan- 
tage there is also the oppor- 
tunity to bond with mem- 
bers of the community. 



Because the recreation 
center is not strictly for 
those of us that are college 
"kids," both students and 
adults alike attend the step 
aerobics classes that are 
offered. 

Both groups have found 
that working together is fun 
and many of the individuals 
who participate check the 
center for posters announc- 
ing future classes. 

And if all of those reasons 



Being in a group moti- 
vates you to do sticli 
with it and sometimes 
work tiarder than you 
would by yourself. 



- Erica Wurst 



aren't convincing enough 
reasons to sell you on the 
idea of step aerobics, here's 
one more: stress relief. For 
Wurst it provides an oppor- 
tunity to take a break from 
school work, her security 
aide job and just plain gets 
her out of the house. 

"Being able to get good 
exercise always makes you 
fell better, especially if your 
having a crappy day," said 
Wurst. 



Want to write sports 
for the Clarion Call? 

Contact: 

Josh Woods Sports Editor 
x2380 or sJtwoods1@clarion.edu 



For those of you whose 
attention I now have, you 
may be saying 'all of that 
sounds great, but what 
exactly is step aerobics?' 

"Step aerobics uses differ- 
ent dance combos and a 
raised platform for our step 
aerobics class," said Wurst. 
"We start with some cardio 
and gradually add basic, 
easy to follow steps and add 
in an abdominal and/or an 
arms and legs workout." 

The program begins with 
a very basic routine which is 
gradually added onto 
throughout the course of the 
semester. 

Typically a basic routine 
will start out with approxi- 
mately a 16 count for each 
part of the exercise- a num- 
ber that increases for each 
set from class-to-class. 

"The biggest thing is I try 
to keep it basic ... as long as 
we keep moving, keep our 
heart rate up and it is easy 
for me to call out the steps 
everything will go smooth- 
ly," said Wurst. "Eventually 
we show everyone how to do 
additional steps on their 
own if they wish to become 
more advanced." 

That way those who wish 
to do more can do more, and 
those who wish to stick to 
the basics can stick to the 
basics. 

Perhaps the best feature 
of all, though, is the fact 
that not only is it easy, but it 
also free of charge to all 
Clarion University stu- 
dents. 

Class is offered every 
week throughout the semes- 
ter, except finals week, on 
Monday, Wednesday and 
Friday from 4*5 p.m. with 
Wurst and Monday- Friday 
from 12-1 p.m. with 
Gardner. 



Cross Country takes first 
at Waynesburg Invite 



Josh Woods 
Sports Editor 

sJlwoodsl@clarion.edu 



WAYNESBURG, Oct. 22 - 
The Clarion University 
Cross Country teams con- 
tinued their winning ways 
on Saturday afternoon with 
each team garnering a first 
place finish at the 
Waynesburg Invitational. 

The women's team stayed 
undefeated on the 2005 sea- 
son, winning easily by an 
11-point margin. 

Despite holding out the 
number one runner on the 
women's side, Erin Richard, 
the Clarion women's team 
was still strong enough to 
win the Waynesburg 
Invitational over a field of 
12 teams. 

Included in that group 
was Cal and Carnegie 
Mellon, both of which are 
tough opponents. 

Tasha Wheatley won her 
first collegiate cross country 



race with teammate Katie 
Jarzab in close pursuit. 

"Autumn Shaeffer also 
had a big day finishing in 
fifth place while adding to 
the Golden Eagles winning 
total of 22 points," said 
Head Coach Daniel 
Caulfield. 

On the men's side, the 
Golden Eagles bounced back 
from a second place finish at 
the Carnegie Mellon 
Invitational to capture their 
third invitational win of the 
season. 

In that race, the men lost 
to Carnegie Mellon by 49 
points in the team stadings. 
Saturday saw a complete 
reversal. 

It was the Golden Eagles 
defeating Carnegie Mellon 
this time in convining fash- 
ion, by a 47-point margin. 

Chris Clark won his first 
collegiate cross country 
race, and paced the men to 
their third victory in five 
meets. 

"Clark's performance has 



put him in the hunt for Afl- 
PSAC honors at Slippery 
Rock this weekend as did 
the fast run of teammate 
Sean Williams who finished 
second," said Caulfield. 

The All-PSAC team will be 
selected after the PSAC 
Championships hosted by 
Slippery Rock University at 
Coopers Lake on Saturday 
at 10 a.m. 

Interestingly, despite the 
successful season both 
teams have enjoyed, neither 
the women nor men are 
expected to compete for the 
top eight places. 

Or at least according to 
the current regional rank- 
ings found at www.d2coach- 
es.com. "Both teams are 
intent on changing that," 
said Caulfield. 

"Our excitement level is 
almost boiling over. The 
amount of mileage and work 
outside of practice that we 
have put in all year has 
been geared for these 
upcoming races." 




^ 



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( 



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I 




Auction extinguished 



One copy free 




Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 




Talent at Open Mic 

8«« EntcrtalnniMit page 7 





Volume 91 Issue 9 



November 3, 2005 




Los Angeles Times - 
Washington Post News Service 

Violence in Iraq IdUs four 
U.S. troops, more tib«a 30 
otheni 

BAGHDAD, Iraq - A sui- 
cide car bomb exploded out- 
side a Shiite mosque south 
of Baghdad Wednesday, 
killing at least 20 people, 
while viol